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Why this has happened I am no expert but from what I understand I think this issue is caused by a mistakenly placed bootflag. Whenever you are installing a linux OS for dual booting you want to make sure the bootloader is installed on dev/sda (i installed it on dev/sda5 which is probably why i got the grub rescue error) To fix this (it worked, at least ...


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Most likely, you should update the existing GRUB boot loader. The existing GRUB boot loader may have been installed to /dev/sda6 or, likely /dev/sda3 biosgrub 9 MB? Anyway, I am guessing that your first Linux distribution was Ubuntu. Therefore, do the following steps. Step 1: Boot and login to Ubuntu 14.04 (or your first Linux distro) Step 2: Open ...


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Please check the boot options first. If boot option is set to UEFI then you will not be able to make your system dual boot, and you will need to go with the UEFI install options. Hope This will help you. Thanks.


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Please try keep pressing up/down keys when your system boots, if there is no effect try this: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair And then click on recommended repair then follow the steps according to the instruction. And then if you don't get ...


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Can you try to hold shift key when booting up? If there is no Windows, boot elOS, open terminal and execute sudo update-grub and reboot Then you should see it And read this


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Although this question was answered in a comment, I wanted to clarify what is going on so you can understand this issue in the future. vmlinuz is the name of the Linux kernel executable. If this file is corrupted, there is no way you will be able to boot the Linux kernel, making an operating system impossible to use. (Programs are useless without a kernel, ...


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Solution: - load up gparted and change the boot flag to the one which says OS (sda2 in my case) - use the Boot Repair tool - reboot :D


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There is a lot of tutorials in internet, it doesn't matter WIN10 or WIN8(8.1). First install windows, then linux.


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e.g. os-prober on linux does access a wide variety of information about the available storage controllers bootable disks partitions/volumes on them layers of abstraction used to access them And finally, the partition and file-system labels, types and IDs. Some are well know to be able to contain "foreign" operating systems, and are then further checked ...


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On this page about os-prober I could find the following sentence: The program Josh Kwan and I developed for d-i to do this is quite flexible, new OSes and linux distros can be added by just dropping in a test file to check for them. It's fairly good at probing all the info needed to boot some installation of linux (the root, and /boot partitions, a kernel, ...


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This is not a kind of 'automatic' detection - it is configured in the configuration of boot loader. A Bootloader is for example GRUB https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_GRUB


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Well, you could use win32 Disk Imager utility to burn the iso which i am sure will work for you but if it doesn't work, you could use rufus and try to use different partition schemes till you get the right one since you can't determine


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Since you have two HDDs, why not take advantage of the boot-priority provided by BIOS : is simple and non-intrusive.


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The easier way might be to "restore" windows and then install fedora. (Regarding shared ESP and the fact that some distros are easy at formatting the already existing one, that's why I didn't go for the "shared" one and ALT Linux makes a separate EFI System Partition just in case...) If you want to have extended fun anyways, read ...


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Well, there are some links 1, 2 given on how to dual boot two Linux distros. Personally, I've not tried but this may help. Just remember one thing that don't choose to override the boot loader (grub) if it's already installed.


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First of all, you must not have several ESPs. The one and only ESP in your system can contain any number of bootloaders in form of EFI applications. Now you need to stick with one EFI System Partition, copy there all files from the other one and then delete the other one. After that, re-install systemd-boot (or any other EFI boot manager of your choice) on ...


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sudo mkdir /boot/efi will create the necessary directory. Perhaps the installer only creates it during the GRUB install, at the point where it decides whether you need the EFI version or not.


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First of all, using /dev identifiers for these purposes is generally a BadIdeaâ„¢ since the disk letter can change (if you have more than one disk). See the Arch wiki entry on persistent block device naming. Second, Gummiboot is a dead project and while it is still an option to use it, you should consider moving to systemd-bootd (which is actually just ...



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