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The solution: installed grub on the second disk and changed the order of boot device.


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Same exact thing happen to me as the original poster when I installed ubuntu. This helped me. Shut your computer down and boot to bios or uefi boot menu. You might see 4 options: ubuntu Ubuntu EFI Network 0 for IPv4 EFI Network 0 for IPv6 Select the Ubuntu with the capital U, thats what it was for me. One ubuntu is the actual ubuntu and the other is ...


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GRUB doesn't work with Windows for me either (I get some error message I can't remember), on my Acer laptop. I use the F12 key to bring up an EFI boot menu (this was disabled by default; I had to enable it in the firmware a.k.a. 'system setup' in GRUB). I've seen another report as well. Many EFI systems will have some equivalent (although some do not, or ...


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Reinstall the CentOS bootloader (whether it is LILO or GRUB). The bootloader installer should recognize OSes in your machine and automatically show you OS choices in booting time. CMIIW.


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The System Setup is just a second name of BIOS setup. When you are in BIOS you see words in the title in there 'BIOS Setup UtilityorCMOS setup utilty` so it is all the same - BIOS, and it doesn't mean an installation of any OS. If you don't like names in GRUB menu you can change them, you would need to operate via /etc/grub.d/40_custom and update-grub which ...


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Hard drives usually don't have labels, it's filesystems that do. Here are the main places where a filesystem label is likely to come up: In /etc/fstab. In your bootloader configuration (e.g. /boot/grub/grub.cfg). If your Grub configuration is automatically generated, run update-grub after changing your labels and verify that the result is what you wanted. ...


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As far as I'm aware, from my own experiences, yes it is normal for Grub to chain link to the Windows Boot Manager. Basically, it is the boot-loader that starts Windows, like Grub is the boot-loader that starts Ubuntu. The reason it is listed like that is because rather than starting Windows by itself, it chains itself to the Windows boot-loader so it'll do ...


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As far as I know, labels aren't that much used in the unix world, so there isn't any danger in changing them. Keep using the UUIDs and you should be fine.


4

It sound slike one of your systems is configured to treat the hardware clock as localtime, while the other one treats it as UTC. Ubuntu docs leave me to believe Ubuntu is UTC by default, so probably your Arch isn't. You can check and set this by checking if timedatectl status | grep local returns anything, and set Arch to use UTC by saying timedatectl ...


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It is pretty simple , first you have to locate the grub.cfg file, in Ubuntu it will be under /boot/grub/grub.cfg, make sure you take a back up of this file before editing. Open the file with any text editor of your choice in sudo mode, eg sudo vi path/grug.cfg In this file there will be menu entries , which represents each item in the boot menu. Find the ...


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If the order of your boot menu is important (and not just that Windows boots by default), and you don't have anything bootable besides Linux Mint and Windows (like OSX, BSD) you can do: cd /etc/grub.d mv 30_os-prober 09_os-prober as the alphabetical order of the files in /etc/grub.d, determines in what order they are processed. Then you run sudo ...


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You can follow the steps given in Linux Mint itself. Linux Mint tutorials.


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This is a long stretch. I have neither done this or tested this. This is only a theory & I can be wrong Theory spotlight > startup disk You will notice that you can select which disk to start from. Based on this, I have concluded that if you go into osx boot configuration, and partition the HD into 2 portions. Portion A - osx os Portion B - empty ...


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If you encrypt your Linux partitions, this has no impact on Windows. You'll need a small boot partition for the bootloader anyway, regardless of whether you run only Linux or Linux plus Windows. Select manual partitioning during the Ubuntu installation, create an encrypted container, and make three logical volumes (/, /home and swap) on it. Make a small ...


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The fix for this is surprisingly easy. If you were unfortunate enough to wipe your own EFI partition, all that is needed to fix it is a bootable USB or DVD with Windows installed on it. It's as simple as using the automatic repair and it should reboot you into rEFInd with Windows and all of your other stuff intact. Super easy fix!


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Confirm that you've created a full restore disk. It could be simply a repair/boot disk. I recently created restore disks from my laptop (and I know they works as I've used them) and they came to 3 DVDs. With a Windows full restore disk set you'll completely overwrite the HDD (wiping your Arch install), reinstating your Windows and OEM partitions. That ...


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The /home partition is useful if, for example, at one point you want to reinstall Arch or install another distribution, because thus you will save your personal settings, browser history, etc.


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Okay, I actually feel confident after doing some reading that using dd will do what you want. According to this website you can use dd to create an image of your drive, which is what you want to do. Backing up your system: So begin by booting from your live disk. Switch to root mode if you are not root already. su root, or sudo su root Check that no ...


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Parted Magic is very useful, also can do this with a bootable USB or DVD using PartImage on the System Rescue CD (it even comes with the USB boot setup - instructions on the site there). Personally though, can't go wrong with the good ol' Ghost 8 (found on older versions of Hiren's Boot CD but looks like they use a new G4L - Ghost 4 Linux now but try it out ...


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After I shrunk the volume in Windows by a disappointing amount, the option to shrink the volume in the Fedora 20 installer became available allowing me to shrink it down by much more. Shrink the volume in Windows 1. Boot into Windows 2. Go to "Disk Management"     a. Right click "Computer" from the desktop or Start Menu ...


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I don't remember if EFI GRUB2 uses LoadImage() (most likely it does by now as the RestrictedBoot story has basically boiled down to "your last-mile bootloader has to or shim will blow it up") -- it will take EFI drivers (like those available with refind) if that's the case; GRUB-specific filesystem drivers are not available to EFI firmware. Your ...


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Adding fake entries or some hidden keystrokes are NOT secure. If you don't want someone to boot Windows on your computer, then adding protection only for newbies is not sufficient. I can't imagine a case where you don't want to protect from experienced people, but only from newbies. As a solution, I would password protect the bootloader (you use GRUB2, ...



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