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I had a very similar issue with Kali and Windows 8.1. What did the trick for me was downloading bootrepair, setting it up as a bootable USB drive, booting into it and following the prompts. It reconfigured some things and now my system boots in GRUB letting me choose from Kali and Windows. Here is the bootrepair I used: ...


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Use Windows to kill the partition of Linux, delete the volume in the administration center, the you can install Linux Mint without any problems.


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You just follow the exact same steps you used to install 13. You simply need to make sure you point it to the right partitions. Boot into your installed Linux system and run lsblk. That will print a list of your partitions and where they are mounted (if they are). For example, on my system, I get: $ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda ...


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From everything I've read, it seems to come down to having initramfs "embedded into the kernel and loaded at an early stage of the boot process."1 For Mint you will have to configure /etc/crypttab, then make use of update-initramfs.2 From what I understand, this should serve as a guide to creating the initramfs image after installing Mint, which you ...


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It doesn't really answer your question "how", but should give you a bit of insight - and it's too long for a comment. First of all, you can't boot of an encrypted partition. Simply because a the boot chain does understand encryption only fairly late in the process: hardware loads firmware - typically BIOS of UEFI (on x86 platform). The hardware as such is ...


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You can insert your Windows Installation Medium and boot from it. Then you launch a command prompt and enter this: bootrec /fixmbr This should rewrite your Windows Boot Manager, but maybe you won't be able to boot f


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because will have to get rid of Debian eventually and I cannot risk to lose access to Windows. Is there a way to do just that? The least action way (and my recommended path) is to just stay with grub for now and once you're done with Debian boot into recovery console from the Windows CD and run BOOTREC /FIXMBR which will make the Windows boot loader the ...


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Call your PC manufacturers support Support. I too inadvertently wiped out Win 8.1 installing Linux Mint 17.1. My screw up as I didn't pay close enough attention when the option for dual boot came up. Mine is a Dell and the Dell Rep walked me through the process of getting Win 8.1 back up through Command Prompt. Make sure he/she knows if you changed any of ...


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Hi Thanks for your messages, In the end what allowed me to get access to all my old partitions was this command: sudo dmraid -E -r /dev/sda It was the RAID that was interfering with all the recovery attempts. After running this command all the boot disks started to run the recovery properly. First, I recovered windows and then linux using boot-repair ...


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A couple ways to accomplish this: Make a .desktop file in ~/.config/autostart/. This will run when you log in. Us something like sudo cp input.txt output.txt as the command. A more robust solution would be to create an Upstart job, which will run when your system boots.


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I'm not an expert for boot-problems, but i'm afraid you are right and messed up the installation of the bootloader (GRUB) with the efi-partition! I never had a problem with the installation on devices with efi. Just read the Release Notes and turn off secureBoot! I would advise you to install GRUB with SuperGrubDisk in the MBR of the harddisk (in your case ...


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I'm not an expert for this kind of problems, but it seams you don't have a usable bootloader (like GRUB) installed! I also guess that you finally killed your bootloader with the "recovery disk for windows"! --> for the future: If you don't use only Windows forget the tools from Microsoft! They ignore every other system than Windows and so for the most time ...


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Log files were filling up the disk space in /var/log. I just deleted the /log folder and created a new one with 'mkdir log'.


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Do you get to the grub menu, I assume you do not. I also assume that you do not get to a Windows 7 boot menu because you mention "no operating system" message. I would boot into a Linux live CD, run sudo fdisk /dev/sda and toggle boot bit on the sda2 partition. You have two partitions that are bootable when you should only have one, reboot. You should now ...


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The same thing happened to me, I ran: sudo fsck.hfsplus -f /dev/sda2 and then tried again and it worked perfectly. Note: You should replace /dev/sda2 to whatever corresponds to your Macintosh partition.



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