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4

There's one way to break things in a multi-boot situation that none of the other answers has covered: if you hibernate the system when switching between OSs. The hibernated copy of the OS contains assumptions about the state of the hardware (most importantly, the hard disk) that may not be valid after an OS switch. Always shut down completely between OS ...


4

Works no problem, but one caveat: Make sure and disable "Fast Startup" for Windows 8. To do that: - go to power options - click "choose what the power button does" - click "change settings that are currently unavailable" (may have to scroll down to see this, don't remember for sure) - uncheck the "Fast Startup" option. If you do not disable fast startup ...


5

As @terdon explained in his excellent answer, no, you shouldn't expect breakage. One thing that could definitely break, though, is your bootloader. Windows has its own bootloader as does Linux. If it's a BIOS bootloader, the BIOS lives in the first bytes of the boot hard disk. If you install Linux to use GRUB as the BIOS bootloader, then install Windows, ...


2

There is a very small chance of breakage if a future Windows update updates the MBR, in which case it'll overwrite the current bootloader you have (either GRUB or Syslinux) and your Linuxes will be temporarily unbootable until you boot on a Linux installation disc and reinstall GRUB.


14

No, you won't. You can expect 0 rate of system failure unless you do something silly like delete files that are essential to one of the other operating systems. You can have as many OSs installed as you like, they do not communicate and they won't affect each other. Why should they? By the way, there's no such thing as "viewing" a file without "opening" ...


0

I've had similar problems with new installations when there were driver configuration problems. First check your xorg log file to see what if anything happened: less /var/log/Xorg.0.log should tell you what failed. Easiest solution probably to reinstall from scratch.


0

Ok, per request, I'm answering my own question: I tried every single available and provided command. In the original post are both links I found while trying to solve this and links provided with possible solutions. The answer of Firelord, even though wasn't useful, is the more insightful for this kind of problems. It seemed that the problem was with ...


0

You don't even need a separate, unencrypted /boot partition with grub2. See http://www.pavelkogan.com/2014/05/23/luks-full-disk-encryption/ . Rather than having a separate /boot partition (anyhow, it's not a good idea to share your boot partition among distros), I recommend having a separate grub partition (/boot/grub) that's shared among your distros. That ...


0

use liveCD, find partition where ubuntu is installed (use Gparted -similar partitioning program. mount the partition (Ext4-usually): "sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt" (where partition name is sda1 else sdb1, sda2 etc...). Now bind "sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev && sudo mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/dev/pts && sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc ...


0

You need to be certain whether the Windows loader is intact and readable by Linux or not in order to try Linux specific recovery. If you're certain that Linux Mint installation went fine and is working good, open the Terminal, and type sudo os-prober, alternatively, you can press TAB key two times after writing os to see what is the actual command for ...


0

insert windows disk then choose repaire startup then you well be able to boot only to windows after that install easybcd on windows and add an emtry to linux


0

updated info based on comments: In grub menu, press c to open a command-line then type vbeinfo. Make a note of an available resolution e.g. 1366x768, then type reboot. Back in grub menu for 2nd time, type e and add GRUB_GFXMODE=1366x768 right after load_video (or edit it if GRUB_GFXMODE= is already present) - use a resolution that you confirmed was ...


0

There is a possibility that there was an error setting up the OS (especially if you did not use an ISO file provided by the official Linux Mint website). You could try using the startx command if you installed a minimalistic version of the Linux Mint kernel environment. Your best bet is to run which startx to see if there is a startx command, and if there ...


-1

Ok after whole day sitting on the computer (way before I opened this question), I found a solution, this guide here is just great! way more updated then the official one and more reliable. Hope it will help others with this issue!



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