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If this is your setup, all you need to do is boot into Linux and let it know you have a new OS installed. So, keep grub where it is, on /dev/sda, boot into your Linux system and run: sudo update-grub That will generate output similar to this: Generating grub configuration file ... Found background image: /usr/share/images/desktop-base/desktop-grub.png ...


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Linux itself and most Linux bootloaders don't care about the type of partition that Linux is installed it, and don't care whether the partition is marked active. Marking a partition as active is mostly necessary for bootloaders that are installed in the MBR and chainload a bootloader from a partition. Windows's bootloader requires an active partition (or at ...


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If I'm not mistaken, you don't have to set the partition to bootable. I run only dual-boot machines, and have never done this. Do you have a particular reason for doing so?


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You might be interested in Rod's EFI bootloaders introduction and my ALT Linux Rescue might come handy as it contains both Refind boot manager and all the tools needed to mess with partitions and filesystems (e.g., to create another ESP if debian installer didn't do that for you). Note that ESP -- a FAT32 partition with a special GPT UUID -- is both ...


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Following up on the answer by @terdon - when you do the test-step, and grub2-mkconfig does not find the Windows partition. Next, make sure you have the "ntfs-3g" package installed, so that your Linux system can read the Windows partition(s). sudo yum install ntfs-3g After installing that, when you run sudo grub2-mkconfig > /dev/null ... you ...


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I was able to fix the dual-boot. Actually I installed linux's grub in /dev/sda1, and chainloader was able to pick up fedora's boot; I slightly modified my /rpool/boot/grub/custom.cfg: menuitem "Fedora 12" { insmod part_gpt insmod chain set root=(hd0,gpt1) chainloader +1 boot } It also helped carefully re-read the following article at ...


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I resolved, the problem as described here, I followed all the steps to resolve.


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The solution was to download VirtualBox and to use it to install and run CentOS 7 from within Windows 8.1. This is infinitely more convenient than the dual boot setup. I did have to go into the BIOS settings of the PC and enable "Virtualization Features" before the machine allowed CentOS 7 to install. There were problems involved in the dual boot ...


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Can someone please explain how to trigger a command line only boot of CentOS 7 from a USB boot stick? How about single user mode? Press TAB at the CentOS 7 boot menu. Append init=/sysroot/bin/sh to the kernel arguments. vmlinuz initrd=initrd.img inst.stage2=hd:LABEL=CentOS\x207\x20x86_64 rd.live.check quiet init=/sysroot/bin/sh And then... chroot ...


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Try booting to single user mode:click. After that you could use the command: init 3 to boot to runlevel 3. I haven't tried this on centos 7. but this is how i did it in previous versions.


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Why would you need 3 partitions? You only need one. Either sda2 or sda3 are big enough for a normal installation. The new installation normally will overwrite your boot sector, if you don't want that make sure to deselect that option. In that case you will have to boot in the old 14.04 and run update-grub for it to find the new 14.04 and add it to the grub ...


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Part 1 Download Refind, and see the question I asked recently dealing with some of the issues you'll face. Assuming you're using Windows 8.1, you'll want to use the Refind CD-R Image. Be sure to extract the ISO from the zip file, and mount it in Windows 8.1. Note: You need not burn the image as Windows 8.1 supports mounting ISO files now like Linux has ...


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I think all is up side down!!!! It is; but not in the way that you think. Your system is operating perfectly fine, where the definition of "perfectly fine" is "the same way that Windows is doing things on your machine". For some people, that's good and desirable. For others it is, indeed, all upside down; and not the way that Unices and Linux were ...


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If you look farther down in the post you cite, you'll see that commenting out that line was not a fix, and the situation cited there seems to be yours as well. The system time is stored in UTC and your time zone is COT or COT5 and that accounts for the 5 hour discrepency.


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I made a detailed tutorial regarding creation of a GRUB2 multiboot/multiISO LiveUSB. Feel free to fork and make pull request(s)!


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The issue here is that GRUB cannot detect windows installed on your system. However, the GRUB on your flash drive can. In order to fix this, download any recent Ubuntu live medium, then mount the flash drive and hard drive. Now, take a look at the GRUB config file on your flash drive and copy it to your hard drive's GRUB. Make sure you change the values to ...



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