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17

It's possible. In fact, you can share the swap space between completely different operating systems, as long as you initialize the swap space when you boot. It used to be relatively common to share swap space between Linux and Windows, back when it represented a significant portion of your hard disk. Two restrictions come to mind: The OSes cannot be ...


10

You got me curious how this would be done. The Pendrivelinux site had a tutorial I did this from my Mint 9 install instead of a live cd as the site suggests. I started with finding the location of my USB drive in a terminal I ran df it returned the location of the device as /dev/sdg1 /media/LINUXUSB after that I ran sudo su and then to install grub ...


9

Pros If a computer needs to have Linux installed temporarily, Wubi is easier to remove without leaving obvious traces. Without Wubi, you need to re-enlarge the Windows partition and restore the Windows bootloader. With Wubi, you just use the supplied uninstaller. You can even temporarily hide the Ubuntu entry from the Windows bootloader. For someone who ...


8

In my experience always install Windows as first OS. Otherwise it will overwrite the boot loader of the previously installed OS. There are ways around it, but these just make it more complicated. After installing Windows, install your first Linux distribution. It normally will find your Windows installation and add it to its boot loader automatically so you ...


8

In order for the grub-reboot command to work, several required configuration changes must be in place: The default entry for grub must be set to saved. One possible location for this is the GRUB_DEFAULT= line in /etc/default/grub Use grub-set-default to set your default entry to the one you normally use. Update your grub config (e.g. update-grub). This ...


7

NTFS does have file permissions. Either you squashed them through mount options or you used consistent user mappings or you made your files world-accessible. If you use a filesystem whose driver doesn't support user mappings, you have several options: Arrange to give corresponding users the same user IDs on all operating systems. Make files ...


7

After a day of research, I can now answer my own Question: yes it is possible, and you can even use that partition as /boot and store your kernels/initramfs/etc. there. Requirements: Grub >= 2.00 (1.98 and 1.99 do not work) Grub must be installed from a Linux kernel, that has support for EFI variables (CONFIG_EFI_VARS compiled in or as module efivars) For ...


6

When Windows installs itself, it puts a bootloader (NTLDR in NT through XP; winboot after that) in the master boot record that reads boot.ini to show you the boot list. Once you pick something from that list, the bootloader's job is done, and the appropriate kernel is started from an actual partition on your drive. Grub does the same thing; the bootloader ...


6

When you installed Windows it replaced GRUB with the Windows bootloader, which doesn't recognize Linux. You need to boot off the Ubuntu live CD again and reinstall GRUB. The gist of the command is: # grub-install /dev/sda where sda is the drive you're booting off of. There's a good guide on help.ubuntu.com that explains exactly what grub-install you ...


6

Yes it is. There is no requirement for separate partitions in a Linux install, it's just a very good idea. Having certain partitions separate protects you from losing everything if a single partition fails. It is also good to have your $HOME on a separate partition as that facilitates reinstalling or changing distributions. However, you are free to set up ...


5

GRUB2 Bootloader Full tutorial is a good place to start on multi boot configurations with GRUB2. If you are familiar with GRUB, jump straight to the 5th or 6th section. There is also a Superuser question on Setting up a multiboot system with GRUB. There is also a Ubuntu MultiOSBoot community page which suggests you should stick to the Legacy GRUB. The ...


5

First, don't freak out: windows is safe, you really just need to boot into it. I don't know if something changed with Windows 7, at least before booting windows involved running the windows bootloader from grub. So, GRUB (if that's what you're using, check) is (usually) installed in the MBR and has some configuration files in another partition (frequently ...


5

The ultimate goal is to restore the Master Boot Record (MBR) to the hard drive, removing Grub, so you can boot to your Windows partition in the future without stopping at the Grub command line. The easiest way to achieve this is to boot from your Windows 7 installation media. Use the Repair computer link and choose Command Line. At the command line, enter ...


5

If the whole disk is encrypted, and some pre-boot tool asks the user for a key to decrypt it, doesn't that mean this tool has to run beneath the OS that's going to boot? Yes, pretty much. Hardware-based full disk encryption does this: the encryption is handled entirely by the device (hard disk/flash) or possibly in a controller along the chain leading ...


5

I would recommend not to share the /home partition. The issue is many applications store their configuration and data in hidden files and directories in each user home directory. The risk is very high you do not use the very same version of these applications under both of the environments (say gnome, kde, gtk, firefox, thunderbird, VirtualBox, wine and the ...


5

If you have grub installed, run os-prober as root. It does exactly what you want. Update os-prober will only list operating systems other than the one it's on: it's used by GRUB during installation to generate grub.cfg so it's natural that GRUB doesn't need info about the OS it's being installed on. To get the partition mounted as the current /, you can do ...


4

You can run programs from another distribution. However, not all programs will run straight out of the box. A number of programs need files in a specific place or on the search path, that your main distribution might not provide or might provide in a version that isn't suitable. For example, if a program needs a particular library that's only in ...


4

The installation of grub has 2 parts: the resource files, and the boot loader. Each OS installation has its own resource files, but the boot loader is always installed on the master boot record. Effectively, the boot loader that is installed later will overwrite the former. In that sense, you can have only one full functional grub at a time. I guess the ...


4

There are several rolling distros available. See Wikipedia. If you have to ask then you're not ready for Arch Linux or Gentoo (although you might find them a fun way to learn more). Plus, there are several there I'm not familiar with, so I've ignored them. I'd suggest Mint Debian Edition. I've not used it much myself, but Linux Mint has a good reputation, ...


4

You will still have a /home and a /usr and so on, whether you choose to make them separate partitions or not. The reason to make them separate partitions is usually to make sure that if you e.g. start uploading all your movies to your /home/yourname directory, and it fills up completely, you won't have affected any other parts of the system. If they're all ...


4

You should only share data partitions. Do not share any program partitions. /home is fine but avoid bin, dev, etc, usr, var, opt, and pretty much anything other than home. As for the filesystem, it will have to be something both kernels have drivers for. I'm not sure how good BSD's ext support is, but Linux's UFS support is good enough, which means that ...


4

You can use any flavor of linux from a liveUSB, none will require the presence of a linux install on your machine. That's one of the main purposes of a liveCD/liveUSB, to be able to try/use a distro from an external medium, regardless of the OS that is actually installed on that machine. As long as you don't start any install setup, it will not touch your ...


4

There are 2 main reasons for installing Windows first: 1 - The boot loader Configuring the Windows boot loader to load Linux is a royal pain in the butt. It completely overwrites any boot loader that is already there, so if you have Linux installed already you can no longer boot Linux without playing around for hours or reinstalling Grub from a boot CD. ...


4

I use ArchLinux on all my machines. Unfortunately, the ArchLinux installer is no longer as beginner friendly as it once was but installing Arch or Gentoo is a good learning experience. Linux doesn't name partitions in terms of C:\, D:\, E:\ instead it will be /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, /dev/sdb1. Note that *nix differentiates between partitions on the same ...


4

If I understand the Microsoft docs correctly (I should downvote you just for making me read that ;) ), XP cannot load from GPT disks: Q. Can Windows XP x64 read, write, and boot from GPT disks? A. Windows XP x64 Edition can use GPT disks for data only. Q. Can the 32-bit version of Windows XP read, write, and boot from GPT disks? ...


4

No problem. This is the easiest to do if home is a separate partition, but in any case, it can be done. Just put the mount in your fstab (regular mount if it is a partition, mount --bind if it is a subdirectory on another mounted hard drive). The only catch is, all the users need to have the same uid's, otherwise the ownership will be wrong.


4

I'm going use the term BIOS below when referring to concepts that are the same for both newer UEFI systems and traditional BIOS systems, since while this is a UEFI oriented question, talking about the "BIOS" jibes better with, e.g., GRUB documentation, and "BIOS/UEFI" is too clunky. GRUB (actually, GRUB 2 -- this is often used ambiguously) is the bootloader ...


3

The generic procedure to restore Grub is Boot into something Linux (either live CD or on disk, but must have Grub commands available) -- I don't know about other *nix Mount the partition that holds the OS with Grub to be fixed, be sure to mount the separated boot partition if you have it Issue the following command, remember to replace /mnt/suse and ...


3

It's due to the bootloader setup on the potentially-multi-boot USB drive. The Grub configuration for the drive is set up to boot the various OSes directly: it contains entries like menuentry "Ubuntu 10.10 Desktop ISO" { loopback loop /ubuntu.iso linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper iso-scan/filename=/ubuntu.iso noeject noprompt splash -- initrd ...


3

Grub can boot FreeBSD and that's the way I'd do it because I'm more familiar with Grub. I gave up on FreeBSD because of driver problems but I was able to dual boot it with Ubuntu and you should be able to do so as well. Here is a post found by googling. Regarding partitions, you can make any setup you want because both Linux and BSD can boot from logical ...



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