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Mount the windows Partition. (If you can't mount install ntfsprogs-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm and ntfs-3g-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm) Run as root grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg


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Add the shared volume to your /etc/fstab file so it mounts automatically at boot. Then run the following commands: mount -a ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Music /home/My_Music ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Videos /home/My_Videos ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Documents /home/My_Documents Navigating should be pretty ...


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First, there are two rather different versions of Grub. The older version can be referred to as "Grub" or "Grub legacy". The newer version is Grub2. In the places where a user typically wants to make changes they work very differently (Grub legacy is simpler, Grub2 offers finer control). When booting, execution jumps from BIOS to the first boot device. On a ...


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It sounds like you're either booting Windows 8.1 in legacy/BIOS/MBR mode (as opposed to EFI/GPT mode), or YaST is buggy and thinks that you have EFI booting enabled even though you don't. Another possibility is that your laptop's BIOS boots optical drives in EFI mode by default, causing YaST to load in EFI/GPT-only mode. Therefore, if there's a BIOS option ...


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There isn't any big difference on selecting YES or NO for installing the GRUB in the MBR. But if you are new to linux or dual booting there is a greater chance that you'll break your linux installation. If you went with installing the GRUB in the MBR and you break your linux installation you won't be able to boot into windows too so you'll stuck here. And ...


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The official documentation describes how to set up a Kali/Windows dual boot system. The steps are more or less what you describe; for steps 1–2, the documentation shows how to use Kali as a live system (some distributions have it integrated into their installer, but Kali is less targeted at beginners). If you want guided partitioning, then select guided ...


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RE step 6. There is nothing wrong with letting the installer take care of the partitioning for you. But remember not all distro's will set-up partitions in the same way. Some may create a separate root, /home and swap. Others may only create root and swap, bundling your root and home on the same partition. It is generally considered best practice to have ...


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Order of installation should not matter. You should boot to a live USB or CD/DVD some Linux OS, install GParted, and shrink the CentOS partition from there. Then you can install Ubuntu in the free space you just created. Source: I personally have Windows 7, Ubuntu, and Fedora on my desktop. Live media partitioning always works best for me.



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