Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Okay, I actually feel confident after doing some reading that using dd will do what you want. According to this website you can use dd to create an image of your drive, which is what you want to do. Backing up your system: So begin by booting from your live disk. Switch to root mode if you are not root already. su root, or sudo su root Check that no ...


4

It sound slike one of your systems is configured to treat the hardware clock as localtime, while the other one treats it as UTC. Ubuntu docs leave me to believe Ubuntu is UTC by default, so probably your Arch isn't. You can check and set this by checking if timedatectl status | grep local returns anything, and set Arch to use UTC by saying timedatectl ...


3

If the order of your boot menu is important (and not just that Windows boots by default), and you don't have anything bootable besides Linux Mint and Windows (like OSX, BSD) you can do: cd /etc/grub.d mv 30_os-prober 09_os-prober as the alphabetical order of the files in /etc/grub.d, determines in what order they are processed. Then you run sudo ...


2

The /home partition is useful if, for example, at one point you want to reinstall Arch or install another distribution, because thus you will save your personal settings, browser history, etc.


2

Parted Magic is very useful, also can do this with a bootable USB or DVD using PartImage on the System Rescue CD (it even comes with the USB boot setup - instructions on the site there). Personally though, can't go wrong with the good ol' Ghost 8 (found on older versions of Hiren's Boot CD but looks like they use a new G4L - Ghost 4 Linux now but try it out ...


1

After I shrunk the volume in Windows by a disappointing amount, the option to shrink the volume in the Fedora 20 installer became available allowing me to shrink it down by much more. Shrink the volume in Windows 1. Boot into Windows 2. Go to "Disk Management"     a. Right click "Computer" from the desktop or Start Menu ...


1

It sounds like you're either booting Windows 8.1 in legacy/BIOS/MBR mode (as opposed to EFI/GPT mode), or YaST is buggy and thinks that you have EFI booting enabled even though you don't. Another possibility is that your laptop's BIOS boots optical drives in EFI mode by default, causing YaST to load in EFI/GPT-only mode. Therefore, if there's a BIOS option ...


1

Mount the windows Partition. (If you can't mount install ntfsprogs-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm and ntfs-3g-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm) Run as root grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg


1

Reinstall the CentOS bootloader (whether it is LILO or GRUB). The bootloader installer should recognize OSes in your machine and automatically show you OS choices in booting time. CMIIW.


1

Hard drives usually don't have labels, it's filesystems that do. Here are the main places where a filesystem label is likely to come up: In /etc/fstab. In your bootloader configuration (e.g. /boot/grub/grub.cfg). If your Grub configuration is automatically generated, run update-grub after changing your labels and verify that the result is what you wanted. ...


1

As far as I know, labels aren't that much used in the unix world, so there isn't any danger in changing them. Keep using the UUIDs and you should be fine.


1

If you encrypt your Linux partitions, this has no impact on Windows. You'll need a small boot partition for the bootloader anyway, regardless of whether you run only Linux or Linux plus Windows. Select manual partitioning during the Ubuntu installation, create an encrypted container, and make three logical volumes (/, /home and swap) on it. Make a small ...


1

Confirm that you've created a full restore disk. It could be simply a repair/boot disk. I recently created restore disks from my laptop (and I know they works as I've used them) and they came to 3 DVDs. With a Windows full restore disk set you'll completely overwrite the HDD (wiping your Arch install), reinstating your Windows and OEM partitions. That ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible