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14

No, you won't. You can expect 0 rate of system failure unless you do something silly like delete files that are essential to one of the other operating systems. You can have as many OSs installed as you like, they do not communicate and they won't affect each other. Why should they? By the way, there's no such thing as "viewing" a file without "opening" ...


5

As @terdon explained in his excellent answer, no, you shouldn't expect breakage. One thing that could definitely break, though, is your bootloader. Windows has its own bootloader as does Linux. If it's a BIOS bootloader, the BIOS lives in the first bytes of the boot hard disk. If you install Linux to use GRUB as the BIOS bootloader, then install Windows, ...


4

There's one way to break things in a multi-boot situation that none of the other answers has covered: if you hibernate the system when switching between OSs. The hibernated copy of the OS contains assumptions about the state of the hardware (most importantly, the hard disk) that may not be valid after an OS switch. Always shut down completely between OS ...


4

Works no problem, but one caveat: Make sure and disable "Fast Startup" for Windows 8. To do that: - go to power options - click "choose what the power button does" - click "change settings that are currently unavailable" (may have to scroll down to see this, don't remember for sure) - uncheck the "Fast Startup" option. If you do not disable fast startup ...


2

There is a very small chance of breakage if a future Windows update updates the MBR, in which case it'll overwrite the current bootloader you have (either GRUB or Syslinux) and your Linuxes will be temporarily unbootable until you boot on a Linux installation disc and reinstall GRUB.



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