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8

It depends on which boot-loader was installed. If its a standard Debian install it should be GRUB2. Boot the computer with all disks containing bootable installations attached and powered. you need to open Root Terminal application to open a terminal as root. then enter this commands. apt-get update apt-get install os-prober if os-prober package is ...


5

It will use the swap partition, (especially) if it has an fstab entry for it. However your problem is not only with the swap partition, but also with all other filesystem partitions. You're not allowed to mount any of them as long as they're still mounted by the hibernated system. Only one OS is allowed to mount a filesystem at a time, and with Hibernation,...


4

You could: start the computer with both disks attached, boot into (your currently only choice) Debian run update-grub It should detect Windows on the first Disk, and add an entry to the boot-loader choices. And you could then optionally install grub also to the other disk boot sector by running grub-install /dev/sdb sdb is what I assume to be the ...


4

There is no need to uninstall anything. You simply need to install Ubuntu and once you chose the partition to install on (your current ArchLinux partition), the installer will give you the option to format it.


2

Boot repair is your tool unless you installed Ubuntu to the same partition and overwrote CentOS.


2

As per the Manjaro Wiki entry on bootloader configuration: To deal with windows partitions, you will need to install the mtools and os-prober utilities: pacman -S mtools os-prober Then run the grub auto-update utility, which will now be able to access your windows partition update-grub Note: The config file /boot/grub/menu.lst is used by the old grub, ...


1

You need to recreate the grub.cfg using the following command: grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg Or grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg


1

I followed these instructions from It's F.O.S.S. to use bcdedit in an admin-priveledged command prompt, but with a slightly different path since it was Fedora instead of Ubuntu: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\fedora\grubx64.efi When I next rebooted I got to GRUB, which allowed me to boot into either Fedora or Windows.


1

If you hibernate a dual-boot machine, unmount all shared partitions. Make sure that the hibernation fails if any of the shared partitions can't be unmounted. You can relax this a little and set one of the OSes as the “owner” of a shared partition, under the following conditions: Only the owner ever mounts the partition read-write. Other OSes only mount it ...


1

Configure your grub file. grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg .It will find your windows boot manager and add boot menu entry for EFI configuration. Reboot the system.


1

There's a tool that easily recovers/install GRUB to the MBR. http://www.supergrubdisk.org/category/download/rescatuxdownloads/rescatux-stable/ . Just burn the CD image to either a CD/DVD and boot from that disk. In the application window there's a GRUB category, click on "Restore Grub", then follow the instructions. There's also a youTube video in that ...


1

First if you aren't sure of what you are doing, make a backup of your important data. Then you have to follow 3 steps : Open GParted and resize your linux partition(s) in order to have at least 20Gb of free space. Boot on the Windows installation DVD/USB and select "Unallocated space" to not override your linux partition(s). Finally you have to boot on a ...


1

All the files you indicate you want to more are executables. You cannot just run these under Linux. You can try to run these under wine, but you'll have more success converting your W10 setup to a VM (VirtualBox or VMware) and run the programs under Ubuntu in such a virtual machine. On the other hand why bother with W10 stuff if you already have, or ...



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