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1

You do not "see" any audio in /dev/hidraw0 because that control messages are handled over a different endpoint than audio messages. Control messages need reliable transmission while audio can get lost and typically uses isochronous transfers. Your test program results in errors because it tried to write a report of length 2. Here is the decoded HID report ...


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Upgrading my kernel from 3.13 to 3.16 (http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.16-utopic/) and reinstalling the new driver from https://github.com/lwfinger/rtlwifi_new seems to have solved my problems. Don't forget to reboot. Note: Upgrading the kernel in itself did not help.


1

Being physically disabled, I understand how you feel. As such, I'm posting the info I find on your device: VendorID = 0b06 = Athena / Advantage x7500 / Dopod U1000 / T-Mobile AMEO ProductID = a513 = ?? a513 doesn't exist in any USB Database I could find, but I did find this post over at Reddit. I tend to agree that buying a newer supported product would ...


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It looks like hid_multitouch might be your driver. Before blacklisting, try the following: modprobe -r hid_multitouch If this works then add it to the blacklist


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I just 'fixed' it myself, actually. All I did was follow the install guide for the Nouveau drivers and it fixed itself. Here is where I found this.


3

I was using a driver for <3.4 kernel and I have the 3.13. I had downloaded a new driver. I saw "3.1.3"...


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Install the pciutils package. Use the command lspci. Post the output of lspci in your question using the Edit Link, and I'll help you install the driver after we know what it is. Read this Beginner's Guide to Debian Read the Official Debian Manual on Aptitude, the Debian Package Manager. You might want to do this one first, even though you asked it last. ...


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I eventually just wrote a script that could be used to install and uninstall the driver, as well as set up the xorg.conf as my system required it: #!/bin/bash if [[ ! $(whoami) = "root" ]]; then echo -e "\033[1;31mPlease run this as root\033[0m" exit 1 fi if [ "$1" = "enable" ]; then echo -e "\033[22;34mInstalling fglrx... ...


1

I don't think this revision of the chipset is supported by the stock re driver in version 8.2-RELEASE or earlier. You can grab a back-ported version of the driver and rebuild your kernel to include it. A quick search of the FreeBSD mailing list archive turns up this thread, which has links to the updated driver files. If you need pointers on rebuilding your ...


1

this keyboard don't work properly on Linux the entire keyboard freeze if you press any macro key.


0

You haven't said where you got the source you are using, but evidently there's an invalid .config in it. This is used to set various options, such as the processor type. There are literally hundreds of these options with intricate dependencies upon one another (e.g., what processor you choose will affect what other choices you have). The vanilla source ...


4

It's pretty straight forward, although we should distinguish between "driver" and "module". A driver may or may not be a module. If it is not, then it is built into the kernel loaded by the bootloader. If it is a module, then it is in a filesystem hierarchy rooted at /lib/modules/[kernel-release].1 Note that it is possible to boot a kernel together with ...


3

In Linux, most drivers can be either built statically into the kernel, or built as modules. This is a choice you can make when the kernel is being configured for compilation. They will only appear in /lib/modules/$(uname -r) if they are built as loadable modules. Typically, for general purpose systems, especially for pre-compiled kernels made available as ...


1

Use the modprobe command. Assuming the drivers are called radeon and fglrx you can: modprobe -r radeon modprobe -r fglrx In order to check if those are really the right modules do a lsmod Assuming those procedures do what you need you can edit your modules


1

You don't need to modify the kernel, and you can automate it. Add the following single line to /etc/udev/rules.d/99-ftdi.rules ACTION=="add", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0403", ATTRS{idProduct}=="6001", RUN+="/sbin/modprobe ftdi_sio" RUN+="/bin/sh -c 'echo 0403 6001 > /sys/bus/usb-serial/drivers/ftdi_sio/new_id'" Either reboot or run 'sudo udevadm control ...


3

I suspect that the issue is with your driver rather than any process using it. You'll need to make sure that nothing is using it and then remove it with modprobe -r. Try bringing down the network interface first. For example: # ip link set wlan0 down # modprobe -r <module> You can find out the module name using lsusb.


0

I had the same issue and this site worked for me http://www.kalilinux.net/community/threads/how-to-make-broadcom-bcm43142-wireless-card-work-in-kali.814/


0

As the error states, you are still running an X server. This error occurs when you try to install the Nvidia .run files while logged in. Make sure you are logged out. Hit CTRL+ALT+F1 and login using your credentials. kill your current X server session by typing sudo service lightdm stop or sudo stop lightdm Enter runlevel 3 (or 5) by typing sudo init 3 ...


0

To install Ethernet driver on Fedora 19: Step 1: Install the follwing rpm packages on your computer: cpp-4.8.1-1.fc19.x86_64.rpm gcc-4.8.1-1.fc19.x86_64.rpm gcc-c++-4.8.1-1.fc19.x86_64.rpm glibc-2.17-14.fc19.x86_64.rpm glibc-common-2.17-14.fc19.x86_64.rpm glibc-devel-2.17-14.fc19.x86_64.rpm glibc-headers-2.17-14.fc19.x86_64.rpm ...


1

You can use a programming language to open a socket and roll-your-own library, using the modbus spec. Otherwise you can use an existing library, I have no experience with any of them, but this looked promising: http://libmodbus.org/documentation/



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