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1

In the modern kernel, devices are described via the device tree. The device tree will contain a description of various hardware elements and names of their respective drivers. When a device matches a device tree entry, the device driver associated with it is alerted. The device driver then probes the device to test capabilities. mac80211 is a framework ...


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All firmware which isn't distributable under the GPL-2 isn't provided within the kernel, but is available separately in the linux-firmware project. You'll find OLAND_pfp.bin there; you can clone the repository and run make install as root, which will install all the firmware in appropriate sub-directories of /lib/firmware.


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mac here doesn't have any relation to Macs: MAC stands for Media Access Control. The module described in details here and it just provides a framework for Wi-Fi drivers to build upon. Also, cfg80211 provides the configuration layer. As I understand it, iwldvm just provides lower-level functionality for iwlwifi (thus the dependency) and other Intel WLAN ...


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There is no such thing as "Official Support of Linux Kernel". Linux Kernel accepts patches from many vendors, including Red Hat, Intel and even Microsoft (lol!). Eventually, drivers/scsi directory became full of that drivers. You may try to cross-reference supported PCI IDs with names from database. Get supported ids with modinfo: find /lib/modules/$(uname ...


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It is technically possible if one of the device supports USB OTG, in which a port may act as master or as slave. You may set up the OTG device as slave, and let it act as an USB hard disk drive (so you don't even need special driver on the master). This is what a lot of phones and some cameras do. If you connect them to a printer they become master; if ...


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Yes this is possible, but it is not possible by cutting two USB cables with USB-A connectors (what is normally going into the USB on your motherboard) and cross connecting the data cables. If you connect the USB power lines on such a self made cable, you are likely to end up frying your on-board USB handling chip. Don't try this at home! On most computer ...


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Try this download from broadcom https://www.broadcom.com/docs/linux_sta/hybrid-v35_64-nodebug-pcoem-6_30_223_248.tar.gz as it has the patches to work with the newer kernels


2

you could use a USB bridge device which is available in a cable form-factor like this ... http://www.usbgear.com/link/ (auto-play video warning)


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Execute the command modinfo <kernel_module_name> and look for vermagic shw@shw:/tmp # modinfo btrfs filename: /lib/modules/3.13.0-36-generic/kernel/fs/btrfs/btrfs.ko license: GPL alias: devname:btrfs-control alias: char-major-10-234 alias: fs-btrfs srcversion: EA2C07F0B841AE2A6D8F91F ...


0

Maybe you could do your research on the ns-3 platform? ns-3 A network simulator for Internet systems It abstracts away all the low level issues, and let you concentrate on the concrete research goal providing a high level API for simulation to you. Good luck.


1

So, the core problem there is that it's looking for the kernel header files needed to compile new kernel modules. You can install those with sudo yum install kernel-devel But the further trick is that the compile process is looking for kernel devel files which match your running kernel. You can run uname -r to find the currently-running kernel, and rpm -q ...


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The basic problem was you do not have kernel headers installed. If you do sudo yum install kernel-devel kernel-headers and boot into the new installed kernel. Then your driver make will be able to find your kernel headers in /lib/modules/{uname -r}/build


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Your kernel pre-dates the release of Cedarview processors, so it's not surprising that you're having problems. Patching the kernel is likely to be rather complex though, given that you're new at it; you'd probably also need to patch X.org and/or MESA to get things working properly. Since you plan to upgrade at some point, I'd suggest doing that first: it ...


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Debian's X Strike Force has a comprehensive guide to building MESA from source and running it without installing it (which effectively allows using it without installing it to a system path).


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It's in kernel space. This article from Linux Device Drivers is a bit dated but still should generally apply: https://lwn.net/images/pdf/LDD3/ch18.pdf However, there is some effort recently towards replacing the kernel driver with a userspace console called "KMSCON" -- see that project's site for more: http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~dvdhrm/kmscon/tree/README


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The Data Server Driver package for DB2 9.5 does not include the install script - that was introduced in 9.7. Installation in 9.5 is manual. The installDSDriver script does a couple of things - it unzips the driver files to several sub-directories, and it creates a db2profile file for bash users. You have several options: Download the 9.7 DSDriver package ...


0

You could try # apt-get install firmware-iwlwifi # modprobe -r iwlwifi; modprobe iwlwifi


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aticonfig --initial --adapter=all -f bash: aticonfig: command not found[/code] This leads me to believe that you have not installed the fglrx package. This is the first thing you need to do. Even if you have already done so perform these commands... sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.BAK sudo apt-get remove --purge fglrx* sudo reboot ...


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The first one is EINVAL (a standard POSIX C error) inverted. If you are curious it's from line 4218 in [src]/drivers/usb/core/hub.c (v. 3.19): 4217 if (udev->state != USB_STATE_DEFAULT) 4218 return -EINVAL; The other one is from the hub_port_init() function in the same file. These kinds of error messages aren't really intended to provide ...


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I probably should have tried this first: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade I also followed the instructions linked above, but it may have worked without that. At least it works now!



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