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Usb devices are far more complex than simply pipes you read and write. You'll have to write code to manipulate them. You don't need to write a kernel driver. See http://libusb.org and http://libusb.sourceforge.net/api-1.0. This is possibly Linux-specific. Under Mac OS X there are user-level functions in I/O Kit that will let you access USB. Here's a little ...


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On Debian, the recommended approach if you want to install the proprietary NVIDIA drivers is to enable the contrib and non-free repositories and install the packaged driver. Adapting the instructions for Debian 8 (do everything as root or via sudo): add contrib non-free to the appropriate line in /etc/apt/sources.list, so you end up with something like ...


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Linux drivers are kernel modules. This means they can be part of the big binary file that is the kernel (and therefore built-in), or loaded later after the kernel starts. The only drivers you really have to have built into the kernel are those to access the root filesystem. Even then, it's possible to have a useable system without such drivers if you ...


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I figured out that it was indeed the rtl8187 driver that was modifying the duration field. The driver was calculating the duration and replacing my custom duration with the calculated one. I had to edit the driver code and recompile it in order to transmit the raw 802.11 frame like I wanted. Once the driver code was modified, any of the utilities mentioned ...


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The bcm4312 is supported by the b43 driver. Install the firmware-b43-lpphy-installer package . Unload driver: modprobe -r b43-pci-bridge modprobe -r ssb Load the b43 driver : modprobe b43


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You need to build a new kernel. The Brodcom BCM43142 is working under the 3.2.81 kernel version. To get some idea about the problem we can refer to the Bug report posted by @stephen-kitt 1) Remove the bcmwl driver 2) Compile the 3.2.81 Kernel 3) Re-install the broadcom-sta-dkms


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Besides what derobert wrote, I find myself using lsusb -t Which will print a tree with various info about connected devices including an helpful « Driver » part. and dmesg | grep driver which will list you the drivers of the latest plugged-in devices. The pros is that these two commands come installed with all distributions.


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The kernel doesn't log module operations in a centralised manner, each module can log whatever it wants (using printk()). The USB module logs "Initializing USB Mass Storage Driver..." etc.; but the FCoE drivers only log messages when errors occur — if everything loads correctly they're silent. Many modules work this way; the tendency is to minimize the ...


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From: http://developer.toradex.com/device-tree-customization Nodes can be referenced using the ampersand (&) character and the label. Overwriting properties To overwrite a property, the node needs to be referenced using the ampersand character and the label. Later device tree entries overwrite earlier entries (the sequence order of entries is what ...


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Finding: N2600 with 3.16 kernel :(Both with / without Quirk 0x80) Bandwidth per camera was 328 Mb. In my case overall allocated bandwidth was 656 (For 2 cameras) and max bandwidth for USB controller was 800. So there was no space available for my third camera. N2600 with 2.6.32 kernel Same my third camera did not work and memory allocation ...


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Files in /dev are mostly created by the udev process which receives events from the kernel by listening to the netlink socket for NETLINK_KOBJECT_UEVENT (see man 7 netlink). The events are sent when a new kernel object (kobject) is created. These objects are also seen in the /sys sysfs filesystem. In particular, files named dev in the /sys/devices subtree ...


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Here's an attempt to automatize the analysis of the log: #!/bin/bash if [ -z "$1" ]; then logfile=/var/log/Xorg.0.log else logfile="$1" fi sed -n 's@.* Loading .*/\(.*\)_drv.so@\1@p' "$logfile" | while read driver; do if ! grep -q "Unloading $driver" "$logfile"; then echo $driver break fi done Any ...


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Unlike certain other operating systems such as Windows, which builds a list of the hardware with its corresponding drivers that it will follow every boot, many Linux distributions will include kernel modules to support most hardware configurations to provide the ease of use that you seem to like. Doing that obviously makes the boot process longer as the ...


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the linux driver was corrupted some how and need to be re-installed


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In EL4 the lspci command is /sbin/lspci . Commands in /sbin/, /usr/sbin/ can be run as root only. The same for lsmod, IIRR. 'lshw' is always an extra package : /sbin/lshw 'update-pciids' is available from a third party package. Note : The old RHEL 4 (kernel 2.6.9) Was released 2005, and supported until 2011.


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I found the solution. It turns out that my version of Fedora 22 came without dbux-x11, which is necessary for a message that a USB stick got connected to travel among processes. If anyone has a similar issue, refer to the following document: http://www.techtimejourney.net/solving-the-automount-issue/


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Skylake support isn't currently all that good in Linux in general. Furthermore, the default kernel in Debian 8.4 (and the associated firmware) is too old... You should try the updates available in the backports: echo deb http://http.debian.net/debian jessie-backports main contrib non-free > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jessie-backports.list (as root), then ...


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The iwl3945 driver is for Intel wifi devices. The Netgear WG111v3 doesn't use that driver. The Thinkpad x60s are shipped with Intel Wifi, so maybe it's a boot time hardware conflict, or the drivers need tweaking. The x60s is supposed to have a switch to turn off wifi. Before booting turn off that switch, then try booting. If that fails, (with the ...



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