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4

It's pretty straight forward, although we should distinguish between "driver" and "module". A driver may or may not be a module. If it is not, then it is built into the kernel loaded by the bootloader. If it is a module, then it is in a filesystem hierarchy rooted at /lib/modules/[kernel-release].1 Note that it is possible to boot a kernel together with ...


3

I suspect that the issue is with your driver rather than any process using it. You'll need to make sure that nothing is using it and then remove it with modprobe -r. Try bringing down the network interface first. For example: # ip link set wlan0 down # modprobe -r <module> You can find out the module name using lsusb.


3

In Linux, most drivers can be either built statically into the kernel, or built as modules. This is a choice you can make when the kernel is being configured for compilation. They will only appear in /lib/modules/$(uname -r) if they are built as loadable modules. Typically, for general purpose systems, especially for pre-compiled kernels made available as ...


2

I was using a driver for <3.4 kernel and I have the 3.13. I had downloaded a new driver. I saw "3.1.3"...


1

Install the pciutils package. Use the command lspci. Post the output of lspci in your question using the Edit Link, and I'll help you install the driver after we know what it is. Read this Beginner's Guide to Debian Read the Official Debian Manual on Aptitude, the Debian Package Manager. You might want to do this one first, even though you asked it last. ...


1

I don't think this revision of the chipset is supported by the stock re driver in version 8.2-RELEASE or earlier. You can grab a back-ported version of the driver and rebuild your kernel to include it. A quick search of the FreeBSD mailing list archive turns up this thread, which has links to the updated driver files. If you need pointers on rebuilding your ...


1

Use the modprobe command. Assuming the drivers are called radeon and fglrx you can: modprobe -r radeon modprobe -r fglrx In order to check if those are really the right modules do a lsmod Assuming those procedures do what you need you can edit your modules


1

You can use a programming language to open a socket and roll-your-own library, using the modbus spec. Otherwise you can use an existing library, I have no experience with any of them, but this looked promising: http://libmodbus.org/documentation/


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Being physically disabled, I understand how you feel. As such, I'm posting the info I find on your device: VendorID = 0b06 = Athena / Advantage x7500 / Dopod U1000 / T-Mobile AMEO ProductID = a513 = ?? a513 doesn't exist in any USB Database I could find, but I did find this post over at Reddit. I tend to agree that buying a newer supported product would ...


1

You don't need to modify the kernel, and you can automate it. Add the following single line to /etc/udev/rules.d/99-ftdi.rules ACTION=="add", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0403", ATTRS{idProduct}=="6001", RUN+="/sbin/modprobe ftdi_sio" RUN+="/bin/sh -c 'echo 0403 6001 > /sys/bus/usb-serial/drivers/ftdi_sio/new_id'" Either reboot or run 'sudo udevadm control ...



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