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15

Yes this is possible, but it is not possible by cutting two USB cables with USB-A connectors (what is normally going into the USB on your motherboard) and cross connecting the data cables. If you connect the USB power lines on such a self made cable, you are likely to end up frying your on-board USB handling chip. Don't try this at home! On most computer ...


10

Execute the command modinfo <kernel_module_name> and look for vermagic shw@shw:/tmp # modinfo btrfs filename: /lib/modules/3.13.0-36-generic/kernel/fs/btrfs/btrfs.ko license: GPL alias: devname:btrfs-control alias: char-major-10-234 alias: fs-btrfs srcversion: EA2C07F0B841AE2A6D8F91F ...


3

you could use a USB bridge device which is available in a cable form-factor like this ... http://www.usbgear.com/link/ (auto-play video warning)


1

In the modern kernel, devices are described via the device tree. The device tree will contain a description of various hardware elements and names of their respective drivers. When a device matches a device tree entry, the device driver associated with it is alerted. The device driver then probes the device to test capabilities. mac80211 is a framework ...


1

All firmware which isn't distributable under the GPL-2 isn't provided within the kernel, but is available separately in the linux-firmware project. You'll find OLAND_pfp.bin there; you can clone the repository and run make install as root, which will install all the firmware in appropriate sub-directories of /lib/firmware.


1

mac here doesn't have any relation to Macs: MAC stands for Media Access Control. The module described in details here and it just provides a framework for Wi-Fi drivers to build upon. Also, cfg80211 provides the configuration layer. As I understand it, iwldvm just provides lower-level functionality for iwlwifi (thus the dependency) and other Intel WLAN ...


1

There is no such thing as "Official Support of Linux Kernel". Linux Kernel accepts patches from many vendors, including Red Hat, Intel and even Microsoft (lol!). Eventually, drivers/scsi directory became full of that drivers. You may try to cross-reference supported PCI IDs with names from database. Get supported ids with modinfo: find /lib/modules/$(uname ...


1

Try this download from broadcom https://www.broadcom.com/docs/linux_sta/hybrid-v35_64-nodebug-pcoem-6_30_223_248.tar.gz as it has the patches to work with the newer kernels


1

So, the core problem there is that it's looking for the kernel header files needed to compile new kernel modules. You can install those with sudo yum install kernel-devel But the further trick is that the compile process is looking for kernel devel files which match your running kernel. You can run uname -r to find the currently-running kernel, and rpm -q ...


1

The basic problem was you do not have kernel headers installed. If you do sudo yum install kernel-devel kernel-headers and boot into the new installed kernel. Then your driver make will be able to find your kernel headers in /lib/modules/{uname -r}/build


1

Your kernel pre-dates the release of Cedarview processors, so it's not surprising that you're having problems. Patching the kernel is likely to be rather complex though, given that you're new at it; you'd probably also need to patch X.org and/or MESA to get things working properly. Since you plan to upgrade at some point, I'd suggest doing that first: it ...


1

It's in kernel space. This article from Linux Device Drivers is a bit dated but still should generally apply: https://lwn.net/images/pdf/LDD3/ch18.pdf However, there is some effort recently towards replacing the kernel driver with a userspace console called "KMSCON" -- see that project's site for more: http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~dvdhrm/kmscon/tree/README



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