Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

The user calls library functions that wrap around the system calls (raw syscall is quite rare for a normal programmer). The module code runs in kernel mode anyway, so at some point, there must be a context switch from user space to kernel space. Ideally, most modules will use standardized interfaces (device nodes, netlink sockets, even inet sockets), so that ...


3

Kernel modules exist in kernel space and therefore by definition require system calls in order to be accessed from userspace, so yes with regard to them. However, it is possible to create userspace drivers that are built on top of some kernel one, although in the end they must make system calls to operate. This is possible with, e.g., I2C devices; the ...


3

For Redhat derivatives, drivers are found in /lib/modules/$Kernel_version/kernel/drivers/ You can see the status of the drivers in the kernel by using lsmod. You can find info on a module by using modinfo which will show you the location. For example modinfo cryptd filename: /lib/modules/2.6.32-504.8.1.el6.x86_64/kernel/crypto/cryptd.ko ...


1

First of all: There are no drivers under Linux. There is something called "modules" which serves the same purpose and as some large company in Redmond, WA calls those "drivers", some people call it that too under Linux... ;-) Typing nvidia-settings --version will tell you what version of the NVidia module is currently installed (even when it's not ...


1

Assuming the snd_hda driver was being loaded (it was), the lack of working sound indicates either a driver conflict or a bad default configuration. To bottom this out I added the following line to /boot/loader.conf to turn on verbose messages in dmesg: boot_verbose="YES" Doing this makes dmesg output much more useful, with all kinds of additional ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible