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The actual kernel code depends on the arch of your system. For x86 systems, they are located in arch/x86/kernel/reboot.c Halt will stop the machine, and leave it in power-on state. So it just stops the kernel, but usually does not power it off. static void native_machine_halt(void) { /* Stop other cpus and apics */ machine_shutdown(); ...


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Debian 3.2.60-1+deb7u3 x86_64 GNU/Linux 867Mbps 802.11ac Intel 7260 card, Dual band 5GHz + 2.4GHz Wireless 2x2 AC + Bluetooth4.0 Your kernel is too old. http://wireless.kernel.org/en/users/Drivers/iwlwifi says "IntelĀ® Wireless 7260 (3.10)", so you'll need at least Linux 3.10. Set up Debian backports, and install a newer kernel: aptitude -t ...


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You can use a programming language to open a socket and roll-your-own library, using the modbus spec. Otherwise you can use an existing library, I have no experience with any of them, but this looked promising: http://libmodbus.org/documentation/


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According to this kernel.org page on wireless drivers; yes you have the right driver! Whether or not a newer version (than what your distro supplies) would be better or not will depend... I have had newer versions of drivers work better but I have also had newer version work worse... So the best answer to that question IMO is another question: "Does it work ...


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According to your link the filename of the driver should be mt7601Usta.ko (.ko is the extension for kernel modules). Kernel modules are usually installed in /lib/modules/$(uname -r), so use find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -name mt7601Usta.ko then sudo rm to delete it if you're sure it is the right module (or mv to move it out from the modules tree so it won't ...


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Most programs and scripts I've seen parse the usual files in /etc, AFAIK there's no other way: On Redhat, look for /etc/redhat-release On Debian, look for /etc/debian_version Mandriva has /etc/version and Slackware has /etc/slackware-version You could also use uname to get the ARCH or, probably the most sane way, use lsb_release.


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NOTE: I'm on Fedora 20 but the issue would be the same here, only the pathing and Linux kernel version numbers are different. When I downloaded and attempted to run the install script, bash ./install.sh I noticed this error message as well. make: *** /lib/modules/3.16.3-200.fc20.x86_64/build: No such file or directory. Stop. The script isn't equipped ...


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A lot of peripherals are removable (USB, Firewire, PCMCIA, hotpluggable PCI, etc.). Furthermore a system installation might be moved to new hardware if the old hardware failed or had to be upgraded. Linux distributions tend to provide all the drivers that you might possibly need, preferring to waste a few megabytes of disk space rather than tell you ...



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