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Google is often the quickest way. However, if you want to search man pages, you can use the following to list (-w) all man pages of user commands (section 1) containing the text .bashrc anywhere: man -w -s 1 -K .bashrc For a file like .bashrc, this will turn up a few false positives in the form of man pages that suggest adding an alias or other setting to ...


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I recommend @akrafs answer, but if that is not detailed enough; you can set up auditd to log which file accessed the configuration file. More details in : http://www.la-samhna.de/library/audit.html


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If you have a package manager, you can query, which package owns a given file. On Arch Linux, you can use pacman -Qo FILENAME On Ubuntu, Debian and other distributions with apt, you can use apt-file FILENAME To search man files, you can use zgrep cd /usr/share/man find -name *.gz | \ # List all *.gz files while read line; do # For each ...


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The ^ in ^r in ASCII text files normally stands for pressing Ctrl plus the following key. In that combination it is more customary to use the lowercase keys, and not the uppercase versions as they appear on (most) keyboards. Thus: ^r → Ctrl+R ^l → Ctrl+L


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perl -h is useful -e program: one line of program (several -e's allowed, omit programfile) -p: assume loop like -n but print line also, like sed


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I don't think it'd be common to interpret tool -f BAR | --foo BAR as «pipe the output of tool -f BAR into the command --foo BAR». So I'd use simply tool -f BAR | --foo BAR There's other possibilities in the wild using additional markup, specially if the invocation is more complex, to make it more obvious. Unlike with optional arguments and [] though, none ...



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