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nslookup, dig, and host are tools for querying DNS name servers. If your configuration is not provided by a name server (like the information given in /etc/hosts) those tools will not show them, because they directly ask the name server. If you want to check that the "usual" resolution is working (i.e. the way specified in /etc/nsswitch.conf) you can use ...


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Youtube and Google are served via a CDN, and having the DNS names they use map to many different IP addresses is normal and expected. If you want to make sure that queries are actually going through DNSCrypt, temporarily stop it: # pkill -STOP dnscrypt-proxy And see if you still get responses to new DNS queries. It shouldn't be the case any more. Then, ...


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Look at the contents of /etc/nsswitch.conf. You probably have not configured the system to use DNS to resolve host names. nslookup and dig don't bother looking to see if the system is configured to use DNS to resolve hostnames. They use DNS regardless. (Though if you don't specify a server, they will use /etc/resolv.conf to find a DNS server to use.) You ...


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If you're just trying to specify the nameservers that the system uses (which I'm guessing you are, based on this question you asked before), you simply need to edit /etc/resolv.conf. At a minimum, it should look something like: lookup file bind nameserver 8.8.8.8 nameserver 8.8.4.4 I've specified Google's public DNS servers there, but amend the ...


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If I'm reading the code correctly, the maximum number is now 5. ASR_MAXNS defined in asr_private.h ASR_MAXNS used in asr.c So you could change it in asr_private.h and re-compile (make obj?). But why are you doing this? If it's anything like Linux/glibc, each query is done in series, with a 5-second timeout, so even going beyond 3 implies the query will ...



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