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4

You can use the +trace option to dig to see the entire sequence of queries, from your system to root servers, all the way down to the authoritative servers.


3

That's 4 uses of host and one of whois. The only way you could speed that up would be to run the commands as background jobs and arrange to check for their completion. That would be a rewrite, which the question declines. To make a background job of each, you'd do something like this, redirecting output to temporary files: ( host -t mx $inp ...


3

That is expected behaviour; if you do not allow recursion, BIND wont iterate through the possibilities/servers to eventually got your answer, and thus wont be able to answer. The important part is creating ACLs limiting the networks who can do recursive requests, and avoid an open DNS server that can be and will be abused remotely. I would also advise to ...


3

If your network blocks direct HTTP access (so that you need to use a proxy), it probably blocks direct DNS access as well. You've configured your system to access Google's DNS servers. That can't work if your network blocks them. Remove the setting where you hard-code your preference of DNS servers, and leave the system default. Typically you get an IP ...


2

I solve the problem by using Amrish instructions at Ask Ubuntu Stack Exchange, i.e. by using the following code: sudo rm /etc/resolv.conf sudo ln -s ../run/resolvconf/resolv.conf /etc/resolv.conf sudo resolvconf -u


2

It is not working because you have commented out the allow-query and goodlients directives. You should uncomment them and populate goodclients with the IPs/networks BIND is supposed to answer queries. acl goodclients { localhost; x.x.x.0/24; }; options { ... allow-query { goodclients; }; } From ...


2

As it is speed what you are looking for: We can do one host call with -t ANY instead of the four used now hoping to get all the four resolutions in one. That will need parsing of the answer. If the whois call could be started and while waiting for an answer from the whois servers we can make the host calls to the DNS servers, we can get the fastest ...


1

Generally no. However, there are special cases where you could make a program that uses LD_PRELOAD to pretend to the C runtime library that you have permission (and your own configuration). This is mentioned in Testing your software stack without root privileges using cwrap: The newest addition to the cwrap.org family so far is resolv_wrapper. This ...


1

I'm not trying to outdo the accepted answer - there is a good answer already, but this was too long for a comment and I thought it might be useful. A significant speedup would result from reducing the 4 calls to host into one call to dig (or host, but the output is easier to handle from dig). Backgrounding the 4 calls will speed things up as the 4 calls ...


1

As you are mentioning different domains abc.com & def.com, you use web server redirection of xx.abc.com to xx.def.com. For example the below sample syntax is used to do redirection in Apache server: <VirtualHost x.x.x.x:80> ServerName xx.abc.com Redirect Permanent / xx.def.com </VirtualHost> This will redirect all request ...


1

Yes, use a CNAME record. Exact syntax and details will depend on your software, but basically in place of writing something like this: xx.abc.com. A 192.0.2.1 …you'll write something like this: xx.abc.com. CNAME xx.def.com.


1

To answer your specific question 'But how does it know whats the IP address of the DHCP server to lease from ? Can someone please help me with that ?', the answer is whichever DHCP server gets a packet to your machine first. If you're running in vmware, it would also be running a DHCP server – you'll need to work out how configure it to not provide an ...


1

Go register a domain name for your site which will be visible to the world. Register for DNS (Domain Naming Service). The registrar will bind your IP address to the site name; this service will be paid.



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