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2

You say it runs dnsmasq. Apart from DHCP, that software already does DNS! Just edit your /etc/hosts on that machine, and it should work. There is certainly a benefit to using DNS for this; after all, that's what it was made for. No, it will not work outside your network, unless you have an NS record at a higher zone. That's fine. As long as every host on ...


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The most common reason why you get a bogus IP address for a nonexistent domain is that your ISP converts negative answers into the address of their ad servers, to serve you more ads when you make a typo in the address of a website. This is definitely a shady practice, but unfortunately some ISPs do it. You can commonly counter that by using different ...


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No IP, in the event the other possible means of looking up an IP address from a hostname fail. Other possible means may be listed in /etc/nsswitch.conf on some flavors of unix, and include plain old DNS, zero-configuration multicast DNS lookup services (e.g. via avahi), cached entries from some previous lookup (positive or negative), and so forth.


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Sshd doesn't care where the connection is coming from, if it's configured to do a reverse DNS lookup, it does.


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Use bind9 and configure it to not answer recursive queries. This can be done as a split brain configuration responding one way to the Internet, and allowing recursive responses from your network. Running dnsmasq and bind9 on the same server takes a bit of doing. You likely don't want bind9 listening on an interface that dnsmasq is serving. This is a ...


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The OP has told me the domain, it is a .org (gov / NGO ) and it is not yet working (e.g. not yet configured but already registered). The domain will have to be configured in a DNS server. No, I wont recommend registering it in the same VPS as your WEB server, it is not good practice. The WHOIS also seems to state no name servers can be moved, so it must ...


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You can set the option UseDNS no in the file /etc/ssh/sshd_config on your server to tell sshd(8) not to do DNS lookups.



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