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4

nslookup, dig, and host are tools for querying DNS name servers. If your configuration is not provided by a name server (like the information given in /etc/hosts) those tools will not show them, because they directly ask the name server. If you want to check that the "usual" resolution is working (i.e. the way specified in /etc/nsswitch.conf) you can use ...


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It looks to me like your code is adding a semicolon to the end of the nameserver line; don't do that.


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The "proper" way to do this would be to add a CNAME record on your local DNS server (that's what handles the conversion from hostnames like "mycompany" to IP addresses like 192.168.5.25). That way, you could point all DNS queries for "mycompany" to "xxx.yyy.local" (assuming "xxx.yyy.local" actually has a valid DNS A record pointing to 192.168.5.25 -- if it ...


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You need to have forwarding enabled on your internal DNS server. You say it has no access to the Internet; I would move it to somewhere else on your network so that it does have access. Failing that, add the external names to your internal DNS.


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Thanks to @ott-- Solution was changing: f6option6 code 6 = string; to: option f6option6 code 6 = array of ip-address;


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One solution might be to temporarily change the order of the nameservers in /etc/resolv.conf Another approach is to iterate through the nameservers and use them seperately: while read IP do echo "Testing nameserver ${IP}" nslookup google.com ${IP} done < <(grep nameserver /etc/resolv.conf| awk '(FNR != 2) {print $2;}')



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