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1

Well, yes, this question gets asked a lot and people will recommend this or that distribution and they all have reasons to suggest a certain choice. What I'd say, though, is that you should probably consider it from another point of view. Ask yourself (or your friend) what exactly you are looking for. If that thing is maximum ease of use then you have a very ...


1

Linux Mint is another good choice. It's rank No.1 on http://distrowatch.com/. Personally, it's friendly with Windows users more than Ubuntu.


6

Ah, the famous conundrum "which Linux distro to install". The best thing would be to install the same distro the friends of your friend use, so he can get help when he needs. If he knows nobody using Linux around him, the simplest and user-friendlier distro is probably Ubuntu. It has a large user base and good support.


1

I strongly suggest FreeBSD. Then you have no question about which "distro" to use and you can install whatever kind of desktop and tools you wish, all the same as most Linux distros carry, so you're not stuck with any one canned way of doing things and you can exchange/swap out whatever you wish while using an excellent, still Unix-like system. No distro ...


1

I recommend to take a look at Archlinux. Although many people say, it is not suited for Linux newcomers, I disagree. The only thing, which is a little bit irritating or perhaps intimidating for new users is, that it comes with no GUI-installer. You get a minimal installation image, that was it. To get up and running, it is useful to do the installation ...


1

Have you considered using Lubuntu? In my experience it's lighter than Xubuntu Other distros to consider are Bodhi Linux or try using Enlightenment on Ubuntu


1

The Arch ARM image is probably one of the leanest available: You can set it up and, when you are satisfied with it, copy it to transfer to your other SD cards using dd: dd if=/dev/sdb conv=sync,noerror bs=1M | gzip >/mnt/yourbackuplocation/rpi.img.gz Restore it with: gunzip -c /mnt/yourbackuplocation/rpi.img.gz | dd of=/dev/sdb conv=sync,noerror ...


1

It will be much quicker if you just download one of the existing images for Raspberry Pi (from the distribution of your choice). You start with a working image and you never have to worry about how to get a setup to a bootable image. You can uninstall and install until you have the system as you want it and then you can just make a backup copy of the SD, ...


1

As a Gentoo user, as my regular desktop, I have to say that both the answers here, are only half correct. [I] sys-libs/glibc Available versions: (2.2) 2.13-r4^s 2.14.1-r3^s 2.15-r3^s 2.16.0^s 2.17^s ~2.18-r1^s ~2.19^s 2.19-r1^s ~2.20^s ~2.20-r1^s 2.20-r2^s **2.21^s **9999^s {debug gd hardened multilib nscd profile selinux suid systemtap vanilla ...


0

I use OpenSuse and upgraded from version 11.3 (from 2009?) to version 13.1 (2014) with no problem at all. Burn CD, run CD, done in a couple of hours. Well... almost... there might have been the need to upgrade some applications, I do not remember now, but that is not really the OS' fault. Yet, there are probably quite a few of them, as others say. A couple ...


3

I would recommend going with a rolling distribution. Meaning that there are no upgrades to higher version, you always have the newest version. Arch Linux is the one of the most popular rolling distros. Obviously Arch is not the way to go if you insist on it being easy to use, as it requires considerably more effort to setup up the system. However Antergos ...


0

Most current distros have had easy upgrade capability for several years now. You might not be out of luck if you want to try upgrading your current distro. Have a look at this document: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Upgrading_from_EOL_Fedora_using_yum#Fedora_16_-.3E_Fedora_17


10

Debian is probably one of the easiest to upgrade - even across major releases. From the Debian FAQ, Chapter 9, Keeping your Debian system up-to-date there is this statement, A Debian goal is to provide a consistent upgrade path and a secure upgrade process. We always do our best to make upgrading to new releases a smooth procedure. Opinion: I have ...


0

Unlike other linux distros, you don't just get a Gentoo iso, hit setup and sit back, having a coffee, while setup does everything. Instead, you grab a stage and start building and compiling you OS. Luckily, for those who only need to get a feeling of Gentoo, there's a live release from time to time (already compiled and put together). In your case, you ...


2

Well, all Gentoo releases are 2.2. Since Gentoo is not a distribution that has releases (i.e. in stepped increments), you won't find that around. Gentoo is a rolling release, which means all packages are continuously updated, there's no global system version like Ubuntu or Fedora. In short /etc/gentoo_release is irrelevant of the system Ā«versionĀ». What you ...



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