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18

Answer to my question, from Qualys: During our testing, we developed a proof-of-concept in which we send a specially created e-mail to a mail server and can get a remote shell to the Linux machine. This bypasses all existing protections (like ASLR, PIE and NX) on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems. My compiled research below for anyone else ...


17

If the lines in your sources.list say "wheezy", you will stay with Wheezy even when Jessie is released. If you change those lines to say "stable" instead, apt will upgrade you to Jessie when it's released, because "stable" will become an alias for "jessie" instead of "wheezy". (And if you change those lines to say "jessie", you'll upgrade to Jessie now, ...


11

Debian is probably one of the easiest to upgrade - even across major releases. From the Debian FAQ, Chapter 9, Keeping your Debian system up-to-date there is this statement, A Debian goal is to provide a consistent upgrade path and a secure upgrade process. We always do our best to make upgrading to new releases a smooth procedure. Opinion: I have ...


7

At the moment elementary isn't providing an upgrade path from update manager since results are mixed. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. You can try: Back up EVERYTHING. Make a Freya install disk. Boot from the install disk and select the "upgrade" option. However, as I said, results may vary. It's always recommended to perform a clean install. An ...


7

No, the upgrade won't be automatic, you have to manually replace every instance of wheezy by jessie in your /etc/apt/sources.list. Alternatively, you could replace them with stable and then, the upgrade will be automatic once Jessie is released. Note that I wouldn't recommend the latter if you use unattended-upgrades, because your system may end up being a ...


6

Ah, the famous conundrum "which Linux distro to install". The best thing would be to install the same distro the friends of your friend use, so he can get help when he needs. If he knows nobody using Linux around him, the simplest and user-friendlier distro is probably Ubuntu. It has a large user base and good support.


5

You can view if a file called /etc/debian_version exists. $ cat /etc/debian_version wheezy/sid If it exists, you also can see the version of debian. Also distributions like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and so on, which are based on Debian have that file. Actually most distributions have a release file you can also try and see what comes out: cat /etc/*release


5

Debian and derivatives (Ubuntu, Linux Mint, …) The configuration for the kernel /boot/vmlinuz-VERSION is stored in /boot/config-VERSION. The two files ship in the same package, linux-VERSION or kernel-VERSION. Arch Linux, Gentoo (if enabled) The configuration for the running kernel is stored in the kernel binary and can be retrieved with zcat ...


4

(I'll refer to original authors or original software as upstream authors and upstream software because that's what I'm used to calling them.) From the end-user's perspective, it's nice to have a single place to report bugs, rather than having to sign up for accounts in various upstream bugtrackers for all the software they use. From an upstream author's ...


3

I would recommend going with a rolling distribution. Meaning that there are no upgrades to higher version, you always have the newest version. Arch Linux is the one of the most popular rolling distros. Obviously Arch is not the way to go if you insist on it being easy to use, as it requires considerably more effort to setup up the system. However Antergos ...


2

The answer to your first question is no, and you can read proof for that from your own post: The kernel ...is ...for Ubuntu 3.2+ for 12.04. Mark the + after 3.2. On my server it is 3.11, not 3.2, so it is not fixed. The version number of the Linux kernel is the defining factor for the kernel. A Linux distribution is defined by many more different things. ...


2

All Linux distributions fundamentally run the same software. What distinguishes distributions is mainly the installer, the software installation mechanisms, and that some system components may be recommended or mandatory on a particular distribution (init system, network management, etc.) as well as the selection of packaged software. For the most part, ...


2

Well, all Gentoo releases are 2.2. Since Gentoo is not a distribution that has releases (i.e. in stepped increments), you won't find that around. Gentoo is a rolling release, which means all packages are continuously updated, there's no global system version like Ubuntu or Fedora. In short /etc/gentoo_release is irrelevant of the system «version». What you ...


1

I strongly suggest FreeBSD. Then you have no question about which "distro" to use and you can install whatever kind of desktop and tools you wish, all the same as most Linux distros carry, so you're not stuck with any one canned way of doing things and you can exchange/swap out whatever you wish while using an excellent, still Unix-like system. No distro ...


1

I recommend to take a look at Archlinux. Although many people say, it is not suited for Linux newcomers, I disagree. The only thing, which is a little bit irritating or perhaps intimidating for new users is, that it comes with no GUI-installer. You get a minimal installation image, that was it. To get up and running, it is useful to do the installation ...


1

Have you considered using Lubuntu? In my experience it's lighter than Xubuntu Other distros to consider are Bodhi Linux or try using Enlightenment on Ubuntu


1

The Arch ARM image is probably one of the leanest available: You can set it up and, when you are satisfied with it, copy it to transfer to your other SD cards using dd: dd if=/dev/sdb conv=sync,noerror bs=1M | gzip >/mnt/yourbackuplocation/rpi.img.gz Restore it with: gunzip -c /mnt/yourbackuplocation/rpi.img.gz | dd of=/dev/sdb conv=sync,noerror ...


1

It will be much quicker if you just download one of the existing images for Raspberry Pi (from the distribution of your choice). You start with a working image and you never have to worry about how to get a setup to a bootable image. You can uninstall and install until you have the system as you want it and then you can just make a backup copy of the SD, ...


1

As a Gentoo user, as my regular desktop, I have to say that both the answers here, are only half correct. [I] sys-libs/glibc Available versions: (2.2) 2.13-r4^s 2.14.1-r3^s 2.15-r3^s 2.16.0^s 2.17^s ~2.18-r1^s ~2.19^s 2.19-r1^s ~2.20^s ~2.20-r1^s 2.20-r2^s **2.21^s **9999^s {debug gd hardened multilib nscd profile selinux suid systemtap vanilla ...


1

Check for the existance of /etc/debian_version. Or you could use lsb_release -a.


1

Try to first look if a /etc/debian_version exists. It should be there if it's a Debian based distro. Usually, looking for apt files could give a clue. For instance, look at the conf in /etc/apt/ or if a /var/cache/apt/ exists. Unforunately, apt can be setup on another distro, or an admin could have set dummy files or directories for some compatibility ...


1

This does not concern the filesystem structure, but you could check whether the apt-get (Debian) or the yum (non-Debian) package management commands are installed.


1

You could easily run a compiled app on every distro which is the same architecture if you compile it statically. If you compile it dynamically then you would run into problems such as the one you mentioned (missing libs) or more frequently the version of the libs from other distros would be incompatible.


1

You should be able to do this in most cases, yes. The only issues I can forsee other than the library issue you mentioned would be distribution-specific file locations, and having that affect your application should be rare indeed.


1

As mentioned it will only be automatic if you have "stable" in the source.list file, if you specifically have "wheezy" it won't automatically happen when you run an apt-get upgrade. This is noted in the full release notes here. Or take a look at a cut down guide which covers this here. Essentially the sources.list must have either jessie or stable, then ...


1

Almost all PC-targeting distros are going to have a way to install GCC, as you can't compile the Linux kernel without it. But it won't always be installed by default, and even if it is, can be removed by the admin. Example: I don't think it's installed by default on Debian. (Though the installer gives you a wide selection of which packages to install, so ...


1

Short answer: package managers are highly integrated into their distribution. You may use a foreign package manager on your distribution, but this can lead to unstable, not up-to-date, redundant installation. Long answer A package manager keeps track of your system components and configuration: Librairies Softwares Configuration files Versions ...


1

You will generally find each distribution prefers one package manager system. Package managers have been ported to other distributions (e.g. APT is available for RH-type distros), but using a foreign package manager may not work well with the distro.


1

What about this? # yum shell > remove fedora-logos fedora-release fedora-release-notes > install generic-logos generic-release generic-release-notes > run --> Running transaction check ---> Package fedora-logos.x86_64 0:21.0.5-1.fc21 will be erased ---> Package fedora-release.noarch 0:21-2 will be erased --> Processing Dependency: ...


1

You can go with CentOS 7, which will be supported for ten years. You can install LXDE/LXQT on it. The other option is Debian 7, but for now it's not clear for how long it's going to be supported. Long support extends the period of software maintenance; it also alters the type and frequency of software updates (patches) to reduce the risk, expense, and ...



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