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Alpine Linux uses a kernel with grsec by default so once installed updates require no added effort.


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LXLE, Bodhi Linux, Elementary OS...all very light and, in my experience, fast on an ASUS seasheall netbook.


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I run Archlinux and I have VirtualBox. It has the advantage to be a rolling release so you don't have the problem to upgrade to a new version every 6 to 12 months, and you always get the latest software a few days after they are released by the upstream. Also, if you are relatively new using Linux, you can try ArchBang, an out of the box and easy to use ...


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Try Linux Mint. To install VirtualBox sudo apt-get install virtualbox I assume that you are going to do .Net development on the virtual machine, if that is the case, I recommend to have a dual-boot setup, so you can use all your machine performance.


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You could use i386 (because your processor supports the IA-32 instructions) or amd64 (because of the x86-64 instruction set). If you want 64bit, you should use amd64. There is a description of the different port on https://www.debian.org/ports/index.en.html: amd64 - 64-bit PC (amd64) First officially released with Debian 4.0. Port to the 64-bit AMD64 ...


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I am currently using a Open Suse 12.3 with Xdm & gnome. It permit at least a full HD display and 1920 X 1200.


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I just went through a similar decision making process. Distros are huge in number & variety. The packages vary like no tomorrow. The more you read, the more confused you will get. So, I figured I will start with a test install of Ubuntu as a stepping stone and then figure out which direction to go from there. I installed Ubuntu lts 12 and 14 but its ...


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Microsoft Linux is a similar effort.  The Overview on the home page states, Microsoft Linux provides all the power of the Linux Operating System with the ease of use you’ve come to expect from Microsoft Products. This is augmented with a list of features, pricing information, quotes from industry and government leaders, useful links, and news bites ...


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Don't fear trying other distributions. If your PC can handle it, maybe you can try them on a virtual machine (or just download a live CD to see how a distro feels like before installing!). Ubuntu is based on Debian, so you may find that distribution familiar. Most of the things you use/do in Ubuntu will work just as well on Debian. Arch lets you choose a ...


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As an Arch user I'd highly reccomend it. it's not extremely beginner friendly but you'd catch on pretty fast, the Arch Wiki is really helpful. If you're worried about installing software, don't be. It's extremely easy on Arch, and if it's not in the Offical Repos you'll find it in the AUR. For installation I'd use the install script ...


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If your mother needs just these two applications and you know how to to go about installing a bare-bones linux distribution, to achieve maximum speed do the following: Install Gentoo GNU/Linux. Your laptop is supported. Then you can install Fluxbox, the window manager. It's extremely lightweight. Along with fluxbox, install FbDesk to make click-able icons. ...


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When I encountered for the same requirement times ago I went for a distribution relying on XFCE as desktop manager. At that time (a dozen of years ago) I chose Xubuntu (it is Ubuntu with Gnome replaced by XFCE), but it is possible that it grew fat since then I don't know. You may give it a try, or opt to Mint which is also an Ubuntu derivative proposing ...


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Almost any distribution will do the trick for both Chrome and Skype. That said, I do know that lubuntu and xubuntu, based on LXDE and xfce4 respectively, are very good choices and installing those apps is a very simple task. I run xubuntu on my desktop machines, however lubuntu has been useful for a few high-end ARM devices I own and while it isn't the ...



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