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use mount's -L option or specify the mount device with LABEL=name. e.g. mount LABEL=MasiWeek /media/masi/MasiWeek or mount -L MasiWeek /media/masi/MasiWeek mount also has a -U option and understands UUID=uuid if you prefer to use the block device's UUID. The easiest way to get a list of all block devices, along with the LABEL and/or UUID details (if ...


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Read-only is just that - reading from the disk. It will pick up sector read errors but (obviously) not sector write errors. Categorically, it is safe to run on a device that is being used a mounted filesystem. With respect to possible false positives, block IO is not "managed", i.e. there are no reader/writer locks. So there is no interaction between ...


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I am not familiar with sfdisk, but you could accomplish the same thing, partition table AND MBR back up using dd. This was in my notes and I am not the author... Backing up the MBR The MBR is stored in the the first 512 bytes of the disk. It consist of 3 parts: The first 446 bytes contain the boot loader. The next 64 bytes contain the partition table (4 ...


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If you only know the partition label and want to find the corresponding kernel name: lsblk -rno label,name | awk '$1=="LABEL"{print $2}' outputs something like sdb3. You can then mount the partition the same way your file manager does, via udisksctl: udisksctl mount -b /dev/$(lsblk -rno label,name | awk '$1=="LABEL"{print $2}')


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Handling it with different user accounts may well be the only possible way since processes do not own any files and can therefore not have a disk quota. To make it even clearer, at the very best you could manage a quota for the files currently used, should you develop such a kernel patch, but it would still lose its sense to track the files that were ...



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