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0

You could change the ownership of the folder by: sudo chown -R username:groupname /mount/mac/Desktop Replace username with your user-name.


1

looks like your using LVM, so you have to expand your current drive after you have resized it. check the following link. [resize on the fly] http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/features/resize-your-disks-on-the-fly-with-lvm


0

Try the current development version of smartmontools. If your disk is still not supported, there is a procedure described somewhere on their site for collecting the SMART parameters of your drive and sending them to the developers. If you send them these parameters they might add support for your disk at some point. Beware that playing with these ...


2

The disk label type is the type of Master Boot Record. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record. The disk identifier is a randomly generated number stuck onto the MBR. In terms of tools for looking at disks, fdisk is on it way to being deprecated if it isn't already so. parted is the replacement for fdisk and gparted can be used to provide a ...


-3

Ok, I know I'm a Windows user, not a linux user, but I had a similar issue a while ago when trying to copy files to a 16Gig data stick, to transfer to and from an old laptop. As it turned out, most of the file system formats for removable devices (ext2, fat32 etc), don't support copying files if the file is greater than 3.2Gigs in size, because of some ...


2

The post is a bit old, but I ran through exactly the same problem (Debian as well) and running the following command as root solved it: apt-get clean it released 2G of rootfs in my case (god knows why). I got this hint from the following link, which seems very comprehensive: https://wiki.maemo.org/Free_up_rootfs_space


9

Your 8GB stick has approximately 7.5 GiB and even with some file system overhead should be able to store the 5.4GiB file. You use tune2fs to check the file sytem status and properties: tune2fs -l /dev/<device> By default 5% of the space is reserved for the root user. Your output lists 97894 blocks, which corresponds to approximately 385MiB and ...


0

You are looking for rescanning the scsi bus. If you search your distro + rescan scsi bus on the Internet you can find some guides on how to do that Redhat based systems https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/5/html/Online_Storage_Reconfiguration_Guide/rescan-scsi-bus.html ...


1

If you don't want to fiddle with dd, gdisk can do: $ sudo gdisk /dev/sdb GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.8 Partition table scan: MBR: protective BSD: not present APM: not present GPT: present Found valid GPT with protective MBR; using GPT. Command (? for help): ? b back up GPT data to a file <snip> w write table to disk and exit x extra ...


1

That depends on what kvm version and what flavour you run. See e.g. https://www.suse.com/documentation/sles11/book_kvm/data/sect1_1_chapter_book_kvm.html where it says: cache mode unspecified In qemu-kvm versions older than v1.2 (eg SLES11 SP2), not specifying a cache mode meant that writethrough would be used as the default. ...


2

The bit size of a processor has no connection with the maximum disk size that the machine can support. The reason you couldn't use your 3TB hard disk with your older PC is not because of a limitation in Windows XP, but because of a limitation with some of its hardware, probably with the disk controller. Each generation of disk controller has a maximum size ...


1

Having a 32-bit processor does not limit the size of the hard disk it can use, only of the amount of RAM it can (easily) address. There have been limits in older IDE standards & controllers that prevent the use of larger hard drives. It's possible you'll hit that on an old machine, if this is an IDE disk connected via an IDE port.



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