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1

Use iotop. It should be available in your repo for a Redhat/Centos/Fedora machine (if it is not already installed). It outputs a similar info as top, but instead of the CPU/memory stats, you will get the IO stats (Disk reads, writes and swapin). The options -p , -u and --only might be of interest to you. For example, to see the IO activity of the ...


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I had a similar issue, but the answers on this page weren't enough. I found the following command to be the most useful for the listing: du -a / | sort -n -r | head -n 20 Which would show me the 20 biggest offenders. However even though I ran this, it did not show me the real issue, because I had already deleted the file. The catch was that there was a ...


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The traditional way is to copy all files elsewhere and see which one triggers a read error. Of course, this does not answer the question at all if the error is hidden by the redundancy of the RAID layer. Apart from that I only know the manual approach. Which is way too bothersome to actually go through with, and if there is a tool that does this magic for ...


0

Well, it would be worth a try, so I thought I'd post it here: # find /root/.local/share -name '*.trashinfo' These are nasty critters. Personally, I encountered them when I started okteta (hex editor) in console mode and kio_trash flooded my terminal with lots of useless "info" about cannot stat: ... messages, i. e. not being able to find files (which I ...


2

I understand this is over a year old, but for the benefit of anyone reading the thread in future, I expect the software you require(d) doesn't yet exist outside of HP Labs: "Understanding the Robustness of SSDs under Power Fault" https://www.usenix.org/system/files/conference/fast13/fast13-final80.pdf Replacing the power fault injection with an event of ...


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Try sudo with the ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid or blkid /dev/sdb1 I have a partitioned+formatted sdb1 also, for some reason it doesn't show up in the list unless I use sudo.


1

Mi casa, su casa On my Ubuntu 14.04 system I have the exact same situation. $ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 465.8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 462G 0 part / ├─sda2 8:2 0 1K 0 part └─sda5 8:5 0 3.8G 0 part [SWAP] sr0 11:0 1 1024M 0 rom Assuming the drive was partitioned using MBR, you ...



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