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1

Although you could resize a filesystem with command line tools, I recommend to use GParted. You should be able to install it with your package manager, or you download the CD image, mount it to the VM and reboot to start it.


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The disk space used by a file includes more than the size of the contents. Most filesystems use fixed-size blocks; if a file's size isn't a multiple of the block size, then the last block is only partially filled. du counts the total number of blocks, which is usually a little more than the sum of the file sizes since it also includes the part of the last ...


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There isn't really a notion of “what occupies the space” in an overlay filesystem. Each branch of the union has its own space occupation. Run du on both branches. If it's getting more full, the read-write branch is the culprit. Since the overlay mount shadows its branches (/root_ro and /root_rw are hidden by the mount on /), you need to gain access to the ...


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Unmount the overlay filesystem, and then mount it somewhere else and check it using du. If I understand them correctly, that should let you see what's in it.


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The answer above is correct in that the reserved space is being subtracted from that available, leaving you with a negative amount of space usable by non-root users. You ask how to remove the error. You can either— free disk space; expand the filesystem; or reduce the size of the reserved area. On an ext3/4 filesystem you use tune2fs to set this ...


3

From your output, the disk /var/dev/ada0p6 seems to be so full that you are now using "reserved space". Usually, 8-10% of disk space are "reserved" (i.e. only root processes can allocate space once disk usage exceeds 90%). Once this happens, free space is reported as a negative number.


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Those figures show a write-bound process, so the cache tuning suggested by OpenNMS won't help. However it could help if you sacrificed durability. If your OpenNMS dies, it doesn't really matter if the database shows it dying a few seconds earlier. (This is unlike e.g. an email server, where clients are relying on at-least-once semantics). You could lose ...


1

Try rrenice from Debian's pslist package, this command sets the priority of 'opennms' (and all its descendents) to the lowest possible setting: sudo rrenice 19 opennms Or that's not available, use plain renice: sudo renice -n 19 -p $(pidof opennms) For disk hog programs, use ionice: ionice -c3 -p $(pidof opennms) BTW: that opennms process seems to ...


2

If you stick to filesystem-independent tools, I can't think of a way to do this other than actually allocating the disk space, i.e. reserve would need to create a (non-sparse!) file of the requested size, and you'd need to delete this file before starting rsync. If the files are on an ext2/ext3/ext4 volume and using root access for some operations is ...


0

While this is a nice collection of tools, to which I'd add the KDE / QT Filelight, which is similar to other gui disk space usage tools, it's not the literal answer to the topic title. If you take the question of this thread literally, that is, what are the largest packages in your system, as a rule, they are: The libreoffice suite of packages, which isn't ...


2

To set the quota for a filesystem: zfs set quota=20TB poolname/backup-filesystem To query the current quota setting: zfs get quota poolname/backup-filesystem Note that quotas can only be set on ZFS filesystems (i.e. made with zfs create pool/fsname), not on subdirectories (made with mkdir). subdirectories of a ZFS filesystem are included within that ...


2

The automounter was designed exactly for this kind of problem. It automatically mounts drives (local or remote) only when they are needed, and unmounted them when they are no longer being used. Install autofs on your NFS client and comment out (or remove) the entries in /etc/fstab. Edit /etc/auto.master and ensure that there is a line like this uncommented ...


1

I have done a lot of research on this. You can do a test on the file with a word count but it will not give you the same number number as a du -sb adir. tar -tvOf afile.tar | wc -c du counts every directory as 4096 bytes, and tar counts directories as 0 bytes. You have to add 4096 to each directory: $(( $(tar -tvOf afile.tar 2>&1 | grep '^d' | wc ...


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Doing what you're asking is not easy, but I have two solutions that I hope might help you out. You have two disks. The first disk has /boot and / as primary partitions, and the third primary partition sda3 takes up all the remaining space and is let over to LVM. You have a second disk that is also let over to LVM in the same VG. Your problem is that to ...


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If you only need to know the size of the directory, you can speed it up a lot by simply avoiding writing the information to the screen. Since the grand total is the last line of the du command, you can simply pipe it to tail. du -hc | tail -n 1 A 2GB directory structure takes over a second for the full listing but less than a 5th of that with this form.



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