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1

It's been a while since I've used NetApp, and so I can't answer with absolute authority, but I can provide an explanation for this type of behavior. This sounds like it's operating very similar to how Linux's LVM operates. Lets say you have a 1TB physical disk with 100% of it mapped to an LVM volume group. Now you create a 100GB logical volume on that ...


2

du tells you how much data there is in the directory where you ran it. df tells you how much data is in total on the volume where your home directory is located. Your home directory is mounted remotely (over NFS); it is likely that it is on the same volume as other home directories, so df reports the data used by all the home directories on the same volume. ...


15

tar -c data_dir | wc -c without compression or tar -cz data_dir | wc -c with gzip compression or tar -cj data_dir | wc -c with bzip2 compression will print the size of the archive that would be created in bytes, without writing to disk. You can then compare that to the amount of free space on your target device. You can check the size of the data ...


1

-cvf does not include any compression, so doing that on a ~1 GB folder will result in a ~1 GB tar file (Flub's answer has more details about the additional size in the tar file, but note even if there are 10,000 files this is only 5 MB). Since you have 4+ GB free, no you will not fill the partition. an easily downloadable copy Most people would ...


2

tar itself can report on the size of its archives with the --test option: tar -cf - ./* | tar --totals -tvf - The above command writes nothing to disk and has the added benefit of listing the individual filesizes of each file contained in the tarball. Adding the various z/j/xz operands to either side of the |pipe will handle compression as you will. ...


5

The size of your tar file will be 937MB plus the size of the metadata needed for each file or directory (512 bytes per object), and padding added to align files to a 512-byte boundary. A very rough calculation tells us that another copy of your data will leave you with 3.4GB free. In 3.4GB we have room for about 7 million metadata records, assuming no ...


1

This is not a term that I've heard with regard to filesystems. df -h should show the usage of all partitions. You can also use df -i to ascertain the number of inodes still available, which can contribute to a full filesystem. If this is the case you need to track down 0-byte files and remove them.


3

They measure the sizes differently by default. Under Linux, you can specify the --si parameter (which uses powers of 1000 not 1024) with df and du to get numbers that match up with how Windows calculates the sizes. Compare $ df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 119G 29G 89G 25% / versus $ df --si Filesystem ...


-1

Free space in filesystems is always just a guess. Different numbers may mean different representations or different results of guessing. I wouldn't be afraid of that.


3

It always annoys how CentOS/RHEL, by default, on a large hard disk, create a fairly small / partition and a really huge /home partition. This is why, when install CentOS, I always manually partition, and never use LVM (which, I have heard, also reduces performance). LVM makes sense when you want to stream a partition across multiple hard disks, but not as ...


1

Ok Massive thanks to neutrinus for pointing me in the right direction and for this post: http://allaboutfedora.blogspot.de/2007/01/how-to-resize-or-expand-lvm-partitions.html I did: init 3 sudo lvextend -L+19GB /dev/mapper/vg_chris-lv_root sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/vg_chris-lv_root where -L means "size" and +19GB adds 19GB, running resize2fs without ...


3

The filesystem is 20G on a partition that has 40G. You need to resize the filesystem! growfs is the correct tool.


1

If you need to see the files based on their size, you can try the below command. du -ah /home | grep -v "/$" | sort -h | tail -6 The above command will give the top 6 files which occupy the space. Then probably, you can decide whether those files are needed or to be deleted. I had a similar issue where I was in need to find the files that occupy more ...



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