Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I'm not sure if this is the one-and-done solution, but it worked for me. I had to create my "LVM" with striping options. lvcreate -L 217T -i2 -I64 -n lv_share VolGroup https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Logical_Volume_Manager_Administration/LV_stripecreate.html Then I had to mount it with the "-o inode64" ...


1

you can create a /home/html and tell apache/nginx/httpd whoever to use it. I cant elaborate, this depend on you web server. you can make a symbolic link from /var/www to /home/www cd /var mv www www.old mkdir /home/www ln -s /home/www /var/www If you have no use for /home, umount it, and mount vg_datastore-lv_home on /var/www (you may try to umount ...


0

Identify the problematic filesystem and then use -xdev to only traverse that filesystem. e.g. find / -xdev -size +500000 -ls


0

The showstoppers: You're running the command df -x /proc /dev/floppy /dev/cdrom. This tells df to skip filesystems of type /proc, which don't exist (the filesystem type would be proc), and to list only /dev/floppy and /dev/cdrom. There's no option to omit specific devices, you can filter them out instead. To print the 5th field in awk, use awk '{print ...


1

LVM is designed to allow easy resizing and redistributing space in exactly the situation you describe. However, Lambert's answer is incomplete as it fails to mention several things. The outline process you need to follow is: Use resize2fs to reduce the size of the /home filesystem Use lvresize to reduce the size of the /dev/mapper/nice--rack--vg-home ...


0

Have a look at lvresize. Use man lvresize to read about the options. The following commands should first reduce the size of the home logical volume by 3GB and then extend the root logical volume by 3GB: lvresize -r -L -3G /dev/nice-rack-vg/home lvresize -r -L +3G /dev/nice-rack-vg/root It is necessary that the home logical volume is unmounted to be able ...


1

The main issues you have here are fsExclude is an array, to get all its elements, you need ${array[@]}. In any case, the -x option needs file system types, not devices. A syntax error in your awk command, you wanted awk '{print $5}' Without the print, awk will take the expression $5 which evaluates to true if a 5th field exists and will ...


3

LVM is built on the device mapper code in Linux. This means that all the LVM commands are actually creating and manipulating device mapper devices. So, the symlink to ../dm-1 is normal. If you are curious about the device mapper, you can inspect its state using dmsetup, e.g. dmsetup info /dev/dm-1. As for why you cannot see the swap device in df, that is ...


1

What you might be looking for is such a trivial shell script, it's no surprise "pre-built" programs are scarce. How this script works depends on how you organize your backups. If you are sure you can rely on the backup tar-ball's file-creation time-stamp, you can simply use find: find /backup-dir -type f -ctime +366 -exec echo rm -f {} + Will find all ...


0

Since du / reports 51GB, 51GB is what you're using. It's possible that there's some used space that you aren't seeing, such as deleted files or files hidden by a mount point (see the end of Why are there so many different ways to measure disk usage? — in fact the whole answer is probably of interest). But in your case that's unlikely. If the PostgresQL ...


0

/dev/disk/by-label/DOROOT and rootfs are both shown as mounted on / and have the same sizes. This should be a hint that it is in fact the same filesystem that is displayed twice. rootfs is a special name for the root filesystem; it's shown instead of the path to a device due to the peculiar way in which the root filesystem is mounted (not a peculiarity of ...


1

By running fdisk -l you can see the disk's partition layout, and if then either one or two things could happen: 1# If it was a partitioning error, and there is nothing important on the other partition(s), then you could reset the partition table... But if there was something important in the other partition(s) than you could always back it up before ...


1

rsnapshot is a perl script that uses rsync to create backup's of files, it can be configured to retain a count (number) of backups, eg 12 monthly backups, deletes older backups automatically. Periods can be set in hours, days, weeks, months and as you have already guessed, it would be invoked automatically by cron. I've used it to create daily snapshots of ...


2

Chances are that the excess space are allocated to open but already deleted files. du will only show those files which are accessible through the file system (ie: have a filename). When a file is deleted, its file name is removed from the directory, but the disk blocks (and the inode) get freed only when all processes close the open file handles to that ...


1

As previously suggested you can use du -sh command to identify total space usage of any folder. You will want to run this command with sudo to be sure that it captures size information for everything in the folder. The -s option causes du to recursively check disk usage. The -h option is to make the output human readable. When you get the hang of it, you ...


2

For interactively exploring the usage of your filesystem you can use tools like xdiskfree,kdiskfree or baobab. You get basically the same information as in du but you don't have to us it for each subdirectory, but simply click on a directory to see details.


1

du -sh <directory> gives details about the disk usage of the directory. du -h <directory> will give disk usage of each element in the directory. You can use the above to find out which are the directories that are taking disk space.


1

You can use DiskReport.net to generate an online web report of all your disks. With many runs it will show you history graph for all your folders, easy to find what has grow


2

The stat command allows to get the specific data, restrict the output to the file attributes you want, and with user defined formatting. For example to get the time in full resolution: $ stat -c $'%n:\n%x\n%y\n%z' file1 file2 file1: 2015-04-27 08:25:37.199806691 +0200 2015-04-27 08:25:37.199938422 +0200 2015-04-27 08:25:37.199938422 +0200 file2: 2015-04-27 ...


1

Try using stat: $ stat file File: ‘file’ Size: 0 Blocks: 0 IO Block: 4096 regular empty file Device: 802h/2050d Inode: 10359339 Links: 1 Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--) Uid: ( 1001/ terdon) Gid: ( 1001/ terdon) Access: 2015-06-04 13:01:38.783306531 +0300 Modify: 2015-06-04 13:01:38.783306531 +0300 Change: 2015-06-04 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included