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1

http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/12927/list-the-size-in-human-readable-form-of-all-sub-folders-from-the-current-location says: du -ks $(ls -d */) | sort -nr | cut -f2 | xargs -d '\n' du -sh 2> /dev/null


1

You could pipe du output e.g.: du -sh * 32M bin 108K bookmarks3.html 112K cool pic.jpg 17G downloads.zip 12K esata 4.0K emoticons 84K pacman2.jpg 132K rez_g.pdf 128K rez_r.pdf 12G s_archive.xz 6.2T testfile to sed and prepend each line with an index+tab depending on the multiplicative suffix on each line (1 => K, 2 => ...


1

Installing different packages on different partitions is technically doable but difficult. You could use a union mount to direct newly installed packages and package versions to a different filesystem while keeping everything visible at the normal location, but it's overkill. Instead of installing new packages in a different location, pick a large directory ...


0

You can do it: root@debian:/# find /archives/ISO/ -type d -o -type f -size +1024M -exec du -sh {} + |sort -n 1.1G /archives/ISO/Parsix/parsix_4.0r0-i386.iso 1.7G /archives/ISO/CentOS/CentOS-6.3-i386-LiveDVD.iso 1.9G /archives/ISO/gns3_learning.iso 2.2G /archives/ISO/FreeBSD/FreeBSD-10.0-RELEASE-i386-dvd1.iso 2.4G ...


0

You could first check if there is any big log file or similar taking too much space (su du and find to find it). If you are not able to reclaim space by any method (say apt-get clean, find if there is any big file with du -sh /* and then du -sh /bigger_directory/*, etc), then you could move /usr to a new partition on the same or in other disk. This is the ...


1

You don't want to do that. The first thing is to try to reclaim space under root. This is probably doable. To start with, cd to /var/cache/apt/archives and type du -hs. This will give the amount of space used by deb packages cached by apt. You can remove these manually or by using apt-get clean. There are also tools for removing large unused packages. For ...


1

apt-get(8) does not have a direct option to change the install directory. dpkg(1) does, but it is intended for a chroot environment. You could install normally and then move the application files, setting up symbolic links from the original locations to the new locations. This may not work for all applications. Also upon uninstall it may be an issue if you ...


-1

Hope these links will help you: Installing packages into local directory How to choose install location using “apt-get install” How to change the apt-get install directory


12

Gentoo is a Linux distribution that compiles packages from sources. Compiling packages requires much more space that installing pre-compiled binaries (that is, binaries that are compiled on the machines of the distribution maintainers). When you install something from the sources, you also need the sources for all the compilation dependencies. Almost all ...


0

I would have used rsync -avrz storage3 storage4 and then deleted the files afterwards, but I got another question why do you have those shares using NTFS filesystem if you are using Linux (Ubuntu) then I would have gone for ext4 or ReiserFS, ButterFS. IF those shares are located on a Windows box, please try and move those files from Windows to Windows using ...


0

You could try a tar to copy all the data, then remove it afterward: cd /media/storage3/; tar cfp - ./dir | ( cd /media/storage4; tar xfp - ) This will preserve all ownership, permissions and links


1

You could also try: sudo pvscan This will show you if any of the disks are in use by the logical volume manager. You can also use fdisk to determine which device corresponds to each physical drive: sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdb sudo fdisk -l /dev/sbc sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdd


1

lsblk will show you the mountpoint of your disks.


0

A bind mount is equivalent to the original. There isn't one that's marked as the original and one that's marked as a copy. Bind mounts are like hard links in this respect, not like symbolic links. Since GNU coreutils 8.21 (if I read the changelog correctly), df strives to report each filesystem only once. Older versions included one entry per non-ignored ...


2

You don't need to open the log files in an editor to see what's flooding them. Just look at the last few lines: tail -n 999 /var/log/syslog | less Log files from a process always contain the process ID: Apr 10 00:00:01 harfang /USR/SBIN/CRON[345]: (root) CMD ( /usr/local/bin/midnight-stuff ) Apr 10 00:00:01 darkstar wibbled[1234]: I'm bored Apr 10 ...


3

There is actually a strong hint in the syslog snippet you posted. The end of the line Apr 10 00:53:37 MyMachine kernel: [11608.690733] [<ffffffffa08e4005>] ? ath9k_reg_rmw+0x35/0x70 [ath9k_htc] shows the stack trace is due to an unexpected error in a device driver named ath9k_htc. Hopefully, the kernel didn't panicked but the continuous repetition ...


-2

du is used more than df in day to day project as it shows the disk usage as per directory level. df is disk free space and shows at file system level. Another command is dfspace which would also be used.


7

You have a file with a funny name, probably starting with a -. Remember that globs (like *) are expanded by your shell, not the command being run. As an example, say you have: $ ls -1 foo -q Simple enough directory, with two files in it. (The -1 option to coreutils ls makes its output single-column.) When you run du -sh *, the shell notices that the ...


1

You can use du -mad 1 for your purpose. Like @Miline suggested, -a flag will show both files and directory. Using -d 1 will limit the output into only one layer of subdirectory(depth<=1), i.e. files of current folder and subfolder(without detail in content).


1

That looks like file system corruption to me; to fix it, do sudo touch /forcefsck and reboot. This will force a fsck of your file systems.


5

Your best bet is probably iotop: iotop watches I/O usage information output by the Linux kernel (requires 2.6.20 or later) and displays a table of current I/O usage by processes or threads on the system. At least the CON‐ FIG_TASK_DELAY_ACCT, CONFIG_TASK_IO_ACCOUNTING, CONFIG_TASKSTATS and ...



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