Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

The information that df produces comes from the statvfs() system call. If your embedded system does not have the df command installed, perhaps it has one of the common scripting languages, using which you can write a one-liner to access the same system call? python -c 'import os; print os.statvfs("/")' If it doesn't have anything like that installed ...


2

It should be mkfs .vfat -I /dev/sdb. sdb1 indicates you probably have more than one partition, and you're just formatting the first one, which happens to be 64MiB.


2

You can safely delete all files ending in .gz or .<number>. You might want to adjust your logrotate configuration. Please paste the contents of /etc/logrotate.conf and/or /etc/logrotate.d/*.conf (star means any file) so we can help further.


2

Looks like a bunch of log files are out of control; kern.log, message, ufw.log, and syslog. Take a look inside them to see what is filling them up with so much information. Since ufw.log is so big, it's likely a firewall related problem. Note the the .1 files are rotated logs; they are the old log files that were moved out of the way for new ones. Once ...


1

You could turn to ncdu which is a good tool to monitor the disk. http://www.heitorlessa.com/ncdu-different-way-to-obtain-disk-usage-in-linux/


0

1.Make or reuse some script for monitoring disk usage, you can easily write based on df command : df -h <disk> grep -v Filesystem |awk '{print $5}' this is just starting point. 2.Make some tresholds in script e.g if used is 80 % make output WARNING, if used is 90 % make output CRITICAL, so as you can see this is perfect place to use Nagios or some ...


0

Check out the quickstart: Lsof Quickstart I'm surprised no one mentioned the lsof quickstart file (included with lsof). Section "3.a" shows how to find open, unlinked files: lsof -a +L1 mountpoint E.g.: [root@enterprise ~]# lsof -a +L1 /tmp COMMAND PID USER FD TYPE DEVICE SIZE NLINK NODE NAME httpd 2357 apache 29u REG 253,17 3926560 ...


1

You deleted the logs, but Apache keeps the files open. The space will be reclaimed as soon as you restart (not reload) it. Next time, you can truncate the logs instead of deleting them, using > logfile or cat /dev/null > logfile


1

This is most likely because you did not actually remove the files. What I think that happened is the following: Logfiles were created and a program (read: Apache) wrote to them using a file-handle. The file also shows up in your directory listing. You tried to delete the files using rm of a similar way while Apache still has them open. The files are now ...


3

You split your disk into (at least) two partitions - one for your home directories (/home) and another for everything else (/). It looks like you only allocated about 10GB for /, which is now full. The partition mounted as your /home directory is ~621GB, with plenty of free space, but that's not where most system files go. That's the danger of allocating ...


2

376 / 395 =~ 0.95. So you are missing approximately 5% of your disk. That sounds like the default value of disk space reserved by the system for system logs etc. You can find out by running tunefs -l which will show you what your reserved blocks percentage is. You can then retune your file system using tunefs -m See the man page for tunefs for more ...


3

By default, a linux filesystem reserves 5% of the space for root (the user) usage and maintenance. If the device was 100% full, you couldn't even create the temporary files necessary to allow a user to log in... like perhaps.... root! Total space: 395.00G (from your example) minus 5%: 19.75G (reserved space) ============ ======= User space: ...


0

In addition to @Gnouc answer , you can also add ls -la to get more details. You should have sudo privileges to do that . $ find / -xdev -type f -size +100M -exec ls -la {} \; | sort -nk 5


1

Try: find / -xdev -type f -size +100M It lists all files that has size bigger than 100M. If you want to know about directory, you can try ncdu. If you aren't running Linux, you may need to use -size +204800 or -size +104857600c, as the M suffix to mean megabytes isn't in POSIX. find / -xdev -type f -size +102400000c



Top 50 recent answers are included