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0

With zsh: print -rl -- **/*.(rar|zip)(DoL) Replace with ls -lUd -- if you want to see ls -l information about them (-U being a GNU extension). Note that it sorts by size, not disk usage.


1

The possible duplicate Link answered the question partly. To provide multiple name patterns to 'find' use this find $directory -type f \( -name "*.zip" -o -name "*.rar" \) The complete answer to the question is: find $directory -type f \( -name "*.zip" -o -name "*.rar" \) -print0 | xargs -0 -n1 du -b | sort -n -r with $directory being comp_tuts/ dir


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What does df -i / show? You may be running out of inodes, especially if you have a large number of small files around somewhere. From another question about inode usage, you can use find to determine how your inodes are being consumed without consuming space.


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This is because files use up space in whole-block increments. So if your block size is 512 bytes and you have a small 100 byte file, the size it actually uses up will be rounded up to the nearest block - in this case 512. When tarring, because the result is a single file, that inefficiency is reduced since there is only one resultant file - the .tar file. ...


2

What did you delete? If you remove a file that is still in use by a running process (e.g., a daemon), that disk space is only released when the process is shut down/restarted. For example, if you removed current Apache log files, the space will still be in use until you restart Apache. Similarly for system logs (those in /var/log). You can either: ...


2

Most probably you have hidden files in the folder. The point is that glob * selects only files and folders that do not start with .. So, if they do they are not passed to du command. On the other hand from top directory you get size of the directory as a whole, including dot files. To match all files in given folder, including hidden ones try (with bash) ...


0

Run the following: lsof -s | sort -nrk 7 | head You'll see output like so: firefox 2997 j 52rr REG 252,0 10485760 5505182 /some/path firefox 2997 j 50rr REG 252,0 10485760 5505182 /some/path firefox 2997 j 3rr REG 252,0 ...


-1

I read the rules and it does seem to indicate open ended questions like this are not encouraged. Here is a quick link to them: http://unix.stackexchange.com/help However in case it is allowed, I would suggest reading Linux CompTIA or any of the very popular certification courseware. You will need more than just the understanding of disks to become ...


1

cp -al usr link creates a bunch of hard links, but it also creates some directories. Directories can't be hard linkedĀ¹, so they're copied. Each hard link occupies the space of a directory entry, which needs to store at least the file's name and the inode number. Each directory occupies the space of a directory entry, plus an inode for its meta data. Most ...


2

Don't (directly) delete the snapshots (moreover clones) the other replies are suggesting you to do. Your server has multiple boot environments. You can list them with this command: beadm list If you do not need to rollback to a previously created boot environment, you can remove it with this command: beadm destroy boot-environment-name


1

zfs list report it rpool/ROOT 31.9G 11.3G 31K legacy rpool/ROOT/solaris-7 95.3M 11.3G 8.57G / rpool/ROOT/solaris-7/var 27.1M 11.3G 20.5G /var rpool/ROOT/solaris-8 31.8G 11.3G 5.95G / rpool/ROOT/solaris-8/var 21.0G 11.3G 285M /var as told by @andrew this is old snapshot, if you ...


1

You missed snapshots and/or clones. Examine the output from zfs list -t all.


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I'm not sure if this is the one-and-done solution, but it worked for me. I had to create my "LVM" with striping options. lvcreate -L 217T -i2 -I64 -n lv_share VolGroup See 4.4.2. Creating Striped Volumes. Then I had to mount it with the -o inode64 option, as Mark mentioned. See 8.2. Mounting an XFS File System.



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