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1

You can use du -mad 1 for your purpose. Like @Miline suggested, -a flag will show both files and directory. Using -d 1 will limit the output into only one layer of subdirectory(depth<=1), i.e. files of current folder and subfolder(without detail in content).


1

That looks like file system corruption to me; to fix it, do sudo touch /forcefsck and reboot. This will force a fsck of your file systems.


5

Your best bet is probably iotop: iotop watches I/O usage information output by the Linux kernel (requires 2.6.20 or later) and displays a table of current I/O usage by processes or threads on the system. At least the CON‐ FIG_TASK_DELAY_ACCT, CONFIG_TASK_IO_ACCOUNTING, CONFIG_TASKSTATS and ...


2

As demonstrated here, this is actually fairly simple to do. First, enable btrfs quotas: # btrfs quota enable /btrfs_subvolume And then run: # btrfs qgroup show /btrfs_subvolume OR # btrfs qgroup show -f /btrfs_subvolume Which in Btrfs v3.18.2 shows you this: qgroupid rfer excl -------- ---- ---- 0/260 1.09GiB ...


5

I found the answer here The trick is to use the command timeout So the ideal way is timeout 2 df -kh , here 2 is the timeout in seconds.


2

Use: df -khl instead. Option -l tells df to report on local file systems only (from man df): -l, --local limit listing to local file systems (the man df command prints the complete manual page for df.)


5

du reports the disk usage, i.e. the size the files and all surrounding metadata is taking on the disk. The fact you have a very minor discrepancy (0.10%) between the source and destination directories is likely due to the fact the original directory had files that were removed but that still use some ghost space in the directory entries table themselves. ...


-1

if you just want one total; # du -ms


1

The calls above miss large hidden files. Here is the result with du -a du -ahd1 . | sort -rh | head 61G . 38G ./.xsession-errors 7.9G ./A 5.1G ./B ...


0

As I understand it, du calculates the whole subtree usage, and option -d1 only prints data up to the first hierarchie level. Your ls calculates only the first level.


0

Often it could be just a few huge files that are using up unexpected space. Finding these can be quick, not usually more than a minute or 2. Look for these with cd (mount point) find . -xdev -size +20000 -ls > /tmp/bigfiles The mount point could be say / for root file system or /home which ever you are interested in. eg cd /home The -xdev means do ...


1

There's no miracle: unless the system is already tracking that for you, the disk usage command has to traverse all the directory entries, read their size and compute the sum. If the filesystem is mounted remotely (NFS, Samba, …), run du on the server if possible, it'll be a lot faster than running it on a remote client. Since you want to know about all ...


0

df to check File System Disk Space Usage df -a to display Information of all File System Disk Space Usage df -h to show Disk Space Usage in Human Readable Format and Information of File System in GB df -hT /home to display Information of /home File System


-1

All you have to do is type df to get total available and used disk space. It is simple and extremely effective.



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