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4

You don't need to fix that - it's not broken. Those are references to kernel file objects that are not available to du - it's a common race condition involving file descriptors. Those consume no space anyway (and neither does /proc, for that matter) as they are not on disk - they are only temporary references to in-kernel file-descriptors. They are either ...


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On OS X, you can install the needed coreutils via Homebrew: brew install coreutils With this you'll have gsort, which includes the -h command line parameter.


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If you looked at the about screen on windirstat it showed you that it's based on kdirstat. http://kdirstat.sourceforge.net/


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There is already a good answer in a comment by Volker Siegel related to tmpfs: It means there are three tmpfs file systems mounted into three directories. That has nothing to do with which swap files exist. I can add a reference explaining the rootfs issue. ramfs, rootfs and initramfs October 17, 2005 Rob Landley ============================= ... ...


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df reports the percentage of used blocks relative to the blocks not reserved for root use (by default I think it's 5% of the drive in ext3). It can be changed by using the -m option of tune2fs e.g. to set it to 2% tune2fs -m 2 /dev/sdXY The reserved blocks allow system daemons to keep going even when the disk is full, while non-root processes will not be ...


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Short answer: Yes, the files are safe to delete - they are basically just backups of previous cluster states. But... Long answer: The Policy Engine (the part of a Pacemaker cluster which decides what to do when something happens within the cluster) safes backups of the cluster state (configuration and state of resources) to /var/lib/pengine. These files are ...


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In Ubuntu dfc shows a coloured output of your mounted devices and is available via apt: sudo apt-get install dfc output like this: Unfortunately this is not available for CentOS as an rpm.


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rev and egrep and uniq are all eating your zeros and seeing a single line. If you have GNU find and uniq you can simplify this a lot: find ...tests... -printf '%h\0' | uniq -z | xargs -0 du -sh GNU find's -printf option takes a format describing the output for each file. %h is the format for the path up to but not including the filename, and then \0 makes ...


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The main complication in your example commands is getting the directory name. You can get this much easier, directly, with the -printf option of find. It has a format for writing out the directory only: %h. Using that should allow to simplify your command a lot. To write out the directories only, use: find ... -type f ... -printf '%h\n' You can use that ...


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You can use ncdu itself! This shows the uncompressed sizes of the files. In the case you say you care about, namely many uncompressible files, it should reflect what you need pretty well: Too make the file sizes accessible to ncdu, they need to be in a file system. So we need to mount the archive as a file system. We use a fuse user-space filesystem ...



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