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1

/dev/shm - shared memory, is used for programs to share things on the RAM. /run - it contains small files, with information about programs in execution, is usefully for example, when a program cant be run twice, so the executing program can alert a second program preventing it to be executed, and other things. /sys/fs/cgroups - ...


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There is nothing abnormal about having tmpfs filesystems in your Linux box. tmpfs is a memory only filesystem, much like the "RAM disks" of other operating systems. As the name implies, the content lives in RAM, so it goes away after a reboot. It is also extremely fast. tmpfs is commonly used in situations where you don't care about the contents of a ...


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To find world writable directories, you can use find / -xdev -type d \( -perm -0002 -a ! -perm -1000 \) -print For files change type to f For symlinks type to l To set sticky bit: find / -xdev -type d \( -perm -0002 -a ! -perm -1000 \) -print0| xargs -0 chmod +t


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d is an abbreviation for default. The default and actual permissions are independent. Run the setfacl command a second time without the d:, then the permissions should work as desired. I assume you want the effect of both commands. The output of getfacl can suggest this conclusion to you, by showing default: expanded showing the original Access Control ...


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I dont know if that is a answer because ls is written in C, but you can write a shell script to do a "ls" using the for loop: for f in *;do echo $f; done It is also usefull in some static shells...


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ls is not a shell script, if you issue file command, you will know it's an ELF 64-bit LSB executable file: $ type -a ls ls is aliased to `ls --color=auto' ls is /usr/bin/ls #<---- now we know the file path of `ls` ls is /bin/ls $ $ file /usr/bin/ls /usr/bin/ls: ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter ...


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It doesn't duplicate the information: you can have more suffixes in a given directory than the plain ".1" or ".3", e.g., (depending on the platform) letters following the numbers. For example, Debian follows the ".3" with a an application suffix such as "pm" for Perl modules. Here is (part) of the listing from /usr/share/man/man1, to illustrate: ...


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At this point I'd say the main reason is backwards compatibility — the directory split was there right from the start, in V4 (that's the fourth release of UNIX, not SVR4). Back then there could have been any number of reasons: avoiding having to handle many files in a single directory, thinking of the manual pages as parts of a book...


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Creating a hardlink should probably be avoided, there's no need for one and a symlink is simpler and safer. Your other solutions are also fine though. You can create as script that calls the binary or you can add the directory to your PATH. The latter might be preferable if you expect to add other binaries in /opt as well. This is essentially a matter of ...



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