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-1

Your question have been asked here. I've modified Mr. paxdiablo's script to suit your problem: #!/bin/bash while true; do mkdir nu for i in dir1/* dir2/* dir3/*; do ln -s $i nu/$(basename $i) done mv smartdir ole mv nu smartdir rm -rf ole done So dir1, dir2, dir3 are directories you want to symlink to, and smartdir is the ...


2

It's not available as part of standard Unix or a graphical Linux interface. Linux system administrators can use overlayfs. Actually one of the most important uses is to allow modifications to a running LiveCD system, e.g. installing extra packages. There are also equivalents in FUSE, which can be used on Linux without root privileges. There will be ...


3

Make sure you are typing in /usr/bin, not usr/bin. The latter means "look for usr/bin starting in the current directory." For example, if your current directory is your home directory (~), then it will look for ~/usr/bin. The former means "look for /usr/bin starting from the root directory." This makes sure that the search for usr/bin starts from the root ...


0

I know of only one GNU/Linux distribution which dispenses with the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard and installs each application into its own directory structure: GoboLinux. While it doesn’t use /opt as the location for installing applications (it uses /Programs), it may be the distribution that you’re thinking of.


2

While developed by the Linux Foundation, the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard is intended to be applicable to Unix-like operating systems in general. According to that standard, "optional application software packages" should be stored in /opt. However, you will also find that many programs distributed in source form will install themselves to the directory ...


5

Each filesystem has its strengths. For example, ext4 is simple and functional, btrfs is specialized for data storage (at least when it is end user ready), f2fs is optimized for flash memory storage and reiserfs is good at handling millions of small files. Hence, a user may want to format its system partition to ext4, bulk data partition to btrfs, flash drive ...


3

Usually the intention is to optimize performance by chosing a filesystem which better suits the purpose and type of files stored beneath that path. For example, some filesystems handle many small files better than others. Take a look at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_file_systems to get an idea.


4

You should choose /var/lib. /usr/com does not exist in FHS 2.3 or FHS 3. FHS 2.3 FHS 3.0 sharedstatedir is a concept in GNU autotools and GNU coding standards GNU and freestandards.org do not always align. The issue you mention came up in a 2006 mailing list post. In the case of Red Hat, the conclusion was to use /var/lib Technically, if you're ...



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