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Temporary files whose lifetime doesn't exceed that of the program that creates them, and in particular aren't supposed to survive a reboot, go into /tmp. Or rather, the convention is to use the directory indicated by the environment variable TMPDIR, and fall back to /tmp if it isn't set. You can execute files in /tmp. While a system administrator could ...


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Shells keep track of symbolic links as a convenience for users. This has the nice effect that cd foo && cd .. always goes back to the original directory, even when foo is a symbolic link to a directory. It has two kinds of downsides: the main one is that other programs don't behave this way; additionally, symbolic directory tracking introduces ...


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It is because cp isn't playing the same link game your shell is. Your shell is tracking the links to the current working directory as an indirection to the current working directory, but the kernel doesn't want any of that nonsense when the shell goes to call up cp - rather the kernel will make the cp's current working directory a fully qualified absolute ...


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I use to create a subdirectory under opt with the name of my app and under this I put temporary and auxiliary files that my application use.


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I have a GUI application (using wxPython) that imports data from elsewhere before processing two to seven data files to produce a CSV file, a PDF report and, if selected, a number of other report formats. I store the source data files (until archived) and reports in directory structures in $HOME/Documents. This works well but you have to stress to Users that ...


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There are typically two sensible locations to put the "data" for services. The distribution default location: Usually, the distribution chose a default location for a service data (redhat/centos use /var/svn, debian tend to use /var/lib/svn). It is much easier and faster to use that location : configuration is already or almost ready, integration with ...



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