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1

There is no need to re-install the OS. You just need to replace the bin files that were in /bin. In theory you might even be able to recover from this without shutting down the computer since most of your core programs are still loaded in memory, but it might be easier to use a LiveCD. Probably the easiest way to recover is to get the installation media ...


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Per FHS, /opt/bin, /opt/lib, /opt/info, /opt/include, /opt/doc, and /opt/man are there for the administrator's convenience. For instance, you might have /opt/jdk and /opt/LibreOffice holding your jdk and office suite, but rather than add a new element to $PATH, ld.so.conf, etc. every time you add another package, you can just symlink the binaries to ...


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You should place locally-installed software in /usr/local. I have no idea what ESS is but I downloaded the file you mentioned and it looks like you could change its install location by editing Makeconf in its root directory and changing PREFIX=$(DESTDIR) to PREFIX=/usr/local.


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Installing different packages on different partitions is technically doable but difficult. You could use a union mount to direct newly installed packages and package versions to a different filesystem while keeping everything visible at the normal location, but it's overkill. Instead of installing new packages in a different location, pick a large directory ...


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You could first check if there is any big log file or similar taking too much space (su du and find to find it). If you are not able to reclaim space by any method (say apt-get clean, find if there is any big file with du -sh /* and then du -sh /bigger_directory/*, etc), then you could move /usr to a new partition on the same or in other disk. This is the ...


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You don't want to do that. The first thing is to try to reclaim space under root. This is probably doable. To start with, cd to /var/cache/apt/archives and type du -hs. This will give the amount of space used by deb packages cached by apt. You can remove these manually or by using apt-get clean. There are also tools for removing large unused packages. For ...


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apt-get(8) does not have a direct option to change the install directory. dpkg(1) does, but it is intended for a chroot environment. You could install normally and then move the application files, setting up symbolic links from the original locations to the new locations. This may not work for all applications. Also upon uninstall it may be an issue if you ...


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Hope these links will help you: Installing packages into local directory How to choose install location using “apt-get install” How to change the apt-get install directory


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There isn't anywhere special the source code needs to be. Normally it'd be wherever your repository is. If you want to leave it somewhere for the next admin to find, the most obvious place would be a company VCS server. /usr/src would also be a reasonable place to look, as well as $HOME. Eventually, if you decide to submit the module for inclusion in the ...


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You could use rsync instead of cp: rsync -R "${CURRENTDIRECTORY}"/"${NEWESTFILE}" "${DEST}" To limit the output path to be relative to MYDIR (for example test1/zip12.zip) you will have to enter the directory before find loop: cd $MYDIR and later find .. If you keep old files in backup directory you could even replace the whole script using rsync ...


6

When you "emptied the recycle bin" what you actually did was delete most of the binary programs from his computer. You have basically bricked him laptop... How you did that without it asking for a password and you not wondering "hmmmm, should I be deleting files I don't know if my friend may need again" is beyond me. But I regress. Go ahead and turn it ...


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You removed the programs from his computer. /bin does not mean "trashbin" /bin means "binaries" as in the executable version of programs. Do not restart the computer. Most likely it wont boot since the default shells are in /bin. If you do turn the computer off you'll need to pull out the HDD to pull any files off of it. http://www.linfo.org/bin.html



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