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Not sure what you mean by "what filesystem". If it means what instance of a filesystem, then using df $(pwd) may be your best bet, except when you know that the file you are inspecting actually is a mountpoint on its own, than using mountpoint $(pwd) may be a better idea. If it means what type of filesystem, then use the common Linux utility stat, it only ...


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I think df . is your best bet. The filesystem usage check is not that expensive (it doesn't have to count any blocks on disk, that information is readily available and stored in memory once the filesystem is mounted). Alternatives like comparing the current path against mount points by using a script would be more expensive.


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This line # mount -o ro,loop ./R2014a_UNIX.iso /mnt/matlab mounts the filesystem contained in the CD / DVD image R2014a_UNIX.iso at '/mnt/matlab', using the loop device. It doesn't actually copy the data from the .iso image file into the '/mnt/matlab' directory. When a process attempts to access the files that appear to be inside the '/mnt/matlab' ...


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The best place to install additional software packages in linux is /opt/. So create a directory for MatLab there and install it. # mkdir /opt/matlab # mount -o ro,loop ./R2014a_UNIX.iso /media/cdrom # /media/cdrom/install # umount /media/cdrom As your installer is in the form of an ISO image, mount it in /media/cdrom. I hope the installer ...


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Since Finder is built in objective-c it uses nib localizations. Here is an example. /System/Library/CoreServices/Finder.app/Contents/Resources/sv.lproj/ServicesMenu.strings sv.lproj stands for Svenska.localized project Here is the contents of ServicesMenu.strings bplist00”[Finder/Open]Finder/Reveal_Finder/Show InfolFinder/÷ppna_Finder/Visa i ...


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This answer might Help /usr/local The original idea behind '/usr/local' was to have a separate ('local') '/usr' directory on every machine besides '/usr', which might be just mounted read-only from somewhere else. It copies the structure of '/usr'. These days, '/usr/local' is widely regarded as a good place in which to keep self-compiled or third-party ...


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/run/user/$uid is created by pam_systemd and used for storing files used by running processes for that user. These might be things such as your keyring daemon, pulseaudio, etc. Prior to systemd, these applications typically stored their files in /tmp. They couldn't use a location in /home/$user as home directories are often mounted over network filesystems, ...


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According to the latest draft of FSH, /run: This directory contains system information data describing the system since it was booted. Files under this directory must be cleared (removed or truncated as appropriate) at the beginning of the boot process. The purposes of this directory were once served by /var/run. In general, programs may continue to ...


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Files located in /var are very much system-critical. For example, /var/mail or /var/spool/mail contains the users' email; you would no more delete that than you would light a fire in your neighbor's mailbox. It's only files in certain subdirectories of /var that contain files that are more or less transitory: log files in /var/log, caches that can usually be ...


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Well I suppose you could recreate the file empty and then do apt-get install long-list, assuming you know what you installed the first time. I have an ancient script that does basically this from the smallest set of packages that can run apt-get. When using it I ended up reporting dozens of non-declared dependencies. If you don't know everything you ...


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If you look at the purpose of /var as given in the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, it says: /var contains variable data files. This includes spool directories and files, administrative and logging data, and transient and temporary files. Note that "transient and temporary" files are just one of the things it contains. It also contains "spool directories ...


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You can't "recreate" /var/lib/dpkg/status in the sense of just running a command and the file magically appears. No. You need to use a backup of the file, and learn never going around deleting things of the /var/lib directory: sudo cp /var/lib/dpkg/status-old /var/lib/dpkg/status This would give you the package status of the day before. Start praying it ...


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Usage of /var/www is confusing only at first sight. According to the FHS, web server data should go to /srv. That is the main rule. However, it also says that deciding about the structure of /srv is the sole responsibility of the local administrator! Therefore packages must not put anything into /srv, and the default document root must not be /srv, ...



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