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3

Have a look at the Filesystem Hierachy Standard which is also the base for Debian's file system layout. .csv and shell scripts likely go into /usr/share/<yourprogramname> if they come out of the package or /var/lib/<yourprogramname> if they're data which changes over time. Python files are a rather special case, see Debian's Python Policy for ...


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I study electronics and I have a course about the RaspberryPi. Our notes say that /etc stands for "Editable Text Configuration". I always assumed that "the et cetera directory" was nothing more than a nickname. It kind off makes more sense than the other way around, but who am I...


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The Filesystem Hierarchy Standard says, per /usr/local : Local hierarchy, that The /usr/local hierarchy is for use by the system administrator when installing software locally. It needs to be safe from being overwritten when the system software is updated. It may be used for programs and data that are shareable amongst a group of hosts, but not ...


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If it is only used by a local user then I think that there is no point in keeping it in /usr/bin. This also makes it safer to access. Link posted by you also says that it is as per FHS (Filesystem Hierarchy Standard).


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The core dump is written in the current directory of the process at the time of the crash. Of course core dumps need to be enabled, by default those are usually disabled. Check the output of ulimit -c, if that's 0 then no core file will be written. Run ulimit -c unlimited to enable core dumps; this is a per-process setting which is inherited by processes ...


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Ubuntu (and most likely many flavors of Debian) stores the information at /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections. Each of the connections has it's own file entry. The files are secured with file mode 600 and owned by root. The files in this area are not only relative to wireless settings, but information concerning your wired connections.


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There is no standard place: this depends on the wifi connection software. For instance, wicd stores them in /etc/wicd/wireless-settings.conf (which is a bad idea since the whole configuration file needs to be protected). So, I would advise you not to store the passwords with other settings that can be readable by everyone without having to become root.



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