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Aside from home directories, there are three directory hierarchies with writable data: /etc, /tmp and /var. /etc contains system configuration files, most of which are typically not sensitive. But there can be sensitive data there, e.g. wifi passwords. /tmp can potentially contain sensitive data; just about any program might put temporary files there. This ...


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Your question is a little vague, but it looks like you want something like # cd /backup/data # cp -a cm /tmp If you don't want to copy all of the cm directory, do # cd /backup/data # cp -a cm/au cm/ds /tmp The -a option tells cp to preserve as much meta-data as possible.  For it to preserve ownership (rather than make the copies owned by you), you must ...


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It's fine. Remember, it's your home directory; you can do anything you want in there. GNOME/KDE/whatever might complain if you go around deleting .config, but anything you do in your home directory will, by definition, only affect you. Adding some directories in .local is harmless. Putting something in a dot directory will be mildly inconvenient, ...


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The common convention (used e.g. with some install-home targets, like for mercurial, known as hg) is to put them directly under $HOME, i.e., in $HOME/bin, $HOME/etc, $HOME/lib, and so on. This is the result of the GNUish configuration dance starting with ./configure --prefix=$HOME.


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The obvious reasons why not: user's home-directories are often limited in size (quotas on shared systems) predefined profiles often have already added ~/bin to your PATH (making it more convenient to install in that directory) if you have control of the machine, installing into a shareable location works out nicely, e.g., /usr/local/bin. Your ...


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For *.so search: export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:your_lib_dir For executable search: export PATH=$PATH:your_executable_dir I think this two environment variable is enough.


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On Linux Mint 17 I encountered a similar sounding issue. I was zeleous in delteing files and found myself where the "Administration -> Upgrade Manager" just didn't look happy....... The solution that worked for me was to create a directory called "dpkg" as per the error message, and in it create an empty file called "status". I then ran Update Manager. ...


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Certainly you have tighter control of the environment on an embedded system than you do on a desktop or server, and you can probably get away with putting your files anywhere you like (subject to constraints like avoiding read-only filesystems, which embedded systems often have). That being said, I would definitely avoid /root. That's root's home directory ...


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Martin Monperrus wrote a wonderfully quick guide to auto-mounting on Linux using the udev package. Here's a copy of the ussefull bits but be sure to check the comments there too sudo nano /etc/udev/rules.d # automounting usb flash drives # umask is used to allow every user to write on the stick # we use --sync in order to enable physical removing of ...



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