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If you just want to view changes, not edit them, you can convert the files to hex with one program and then diff the output with any graphical diff program you want. It is probably only practical if there are only changed (not inserted) bytes between the files. As a one-liner: meld <(hexdump -C file1.bin) <(hexdump -C file2.bin) And here's a ...


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Generally speaking, when you run a recursive diff between two directories, for each file diff includes a diff command showing you what it is doing for each file. For example: $ diff -ru a b diff -ru a/file b/file --- a/file 2015-07-17 01:06:14.078875805 -0700 +++ b/file 2015-07-17 01:06:21.969077076 -0700 @@ -1 +1 @@ -hello +goodbye Git wants to ...


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Always do diff -rupP file1.txt file2.txt > result.patch When you will see vi result.patch, you know what is exactly difference. Only diff is make very difficult to understand. r: recursively u: shows line number p(small): shows difference in C function P(capital): if multiple files then showing complete path


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In your first diff output (so called "normall diff") the meaning is as follows < - denotes lines in file1.txt > - denotes lines in file2.txt 3d2 and 5a5 denote line numbers affected and which actions were performed. d stands for deletion, a stands for adding (and c stands for changing). the number on the left of the character is the line number in ...


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Use process substitution on bash: diff -ywB --suppress-common-lines <(git branch --merged prod-server) <(git branch --merged test-server)



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