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It's been a while since I've used NetApp, and so I can't answer with absolute authority, but I can provide an explanation for this type of behavior. This sounds like it's operating very similar to how Linux's LVM operates. Lets say you have a 1TB physical disk with 100% of it mapped to an LVM volume group. Now you create a 100GB logical volume on that ...


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This is not a term that I've heard with regard to filesystems. df -h should show the usage of all partitions. You can also use df -i to ascertain the number of inodes still available, which can contribute to a full filesystem. If this is the case you need to track down 0-byte files and remove them.


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One likely reason for running out of inodes is that a large number of files has accumulated in a particular directory for whatever reason. You could check the usual suspects, eg /tmp, /var/tmp, /var/log etc. If you don't find anything, here is a command that I have cobbled together to list the top 50 directories in the filesystem containing the most ...


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Looking at the comments others have helped you diagnose you're out of inodes. If you need to make a few available so you can get some basic access back to your system then you could delete the following files on a CentOS 5 install, assuming you can live without them. Example $ sudo rm -fr /var/log/*.[1-9]?(.gz) This will remove any of the previously ...


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Ok Massive thanks to neutrinus for pointing me in the right direction and for this post: http://allaboutfedora.blogspot.de/2007/01/how-to-resize-or-expand-lvm-partitions.html I did: init 3 sudo lvextend -L+19GB /dev/mapper/vg_chris-lv_root sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/vg_chris-lv_root where -L means "size" and +19GB adds 19GB, running resize2fs without ...


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The filesystem is 20G on a partition that has 40G. You need to resize the filesystem! growfs is the correct tool.



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