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You could use CharybdeFS that was made exactly for this kind of purpose. It's a passthrough fuse filesystem like PetardFS but much more configurable. See the CharybdeFS cookbook here: http://www.scylladb.com/2016/05/02/fault-injection-filesystem-cookbook/ It's advanced enough to test a database.


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This script would do the trick, at least for most typical scenarios. It requires on blkid, lsscsi and sed: #!/bin/bash mkdir -p /dev/disk/by-{path,uuid} for dev in `blkid -o device | grep -v block`; do ln -s "$dev" "/dev/disk/by-uuid/$(blkid -o value -s UUID "$dev")" done lsscsi -v | sed 'N;s/\n//' |\ sed ...


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ifconfig = Solaris ipconfig = Windows ip = Linux That I know, but am certainly open to additions and corrections.


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If you store only backups of MySQL on your / partition then it's easy to move the data. Assume you're storing your data in /opt/backup/ you can: Stop the backup from writing to that directory ( if you're using some backup program ) Move backup folder in / to /home/ ( or any folder in /home as you want) # mv /opt/backup/ /home/ Create a symbolic link to ...


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You first need to get your root partition ("/") down from being full or many bad things will happen in your system. It needs /tmp to be writeable for many system and user tasks. Your root partition is only 50GB so you're never going to get the space you need there with current partition structure. Your options would be to repartition to get a separate /var ...


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The root filesystem is passed to the kernel upon boot using the root argument. So you should be able to: cat /proc/cmdline and then look for root=/some/path, or perhaps root=UUID=longstring. For instance, I get: BOOT_IMAGE=/boot/kernel-genkernel-x86_64-4.4.0-sabayon root=UUID=18f3b5a1-3994-43ef-ad6d-cb4c86ff5f95 ro quiet splash If it's a path, it ...


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The automounter was designed exactly for this kind of problem. It automatically mounts drives (local or remote) only when they are needed, and unmounted them when they are no longer being used. Install autofs on your NFS client and comment out (or remove) the entries in /etc/fstab. Edit /etc/auto.master and ensure that there is a line like this uncommented ...


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Have you tried dstat ? in case of my enp025 Ethernet interface for example : dstat -i -N enp0s25 ----interrupts--- 33 34 35 5 0 0 6 0 0 8 0 26 9 0 0 7 0 0 10 0 0 for doing more stuff , read the man page: DSTAT(1) ...



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