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You haven't said where you got the source you are using, but evidently there's an invalid .config in it. This is used to set various options, such as the processor type. There are literally hundreds of these options with intricate dependencies upon one another (e.g., what processor you choose will affect what other choices you have). The vanilla source ...


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I found the sg command, which seems to be exactly what I needed: sg - execute command as different group ID So I just write a minimal wrapper as follows: #!/bin/bash sg uucp /usr/bin/repetierHost.sh This works perfectly.


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On Debian typically the selected syslogd package takes care of creating the /dev/xconsole pipe. You probably have rsyslog installed; look at the /etc/init.d/rsyslog script and search for create_xconsole which is the shell function that creates /dev/xconsole; it's trivial to modify that to create a second file.


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I would set the group of the repetierHost application to uucp and then set the SGID bit (as long as it is a real binary and not script): chgrp uucp repetierHost chmod g+s repetierHost If the repetierHost is a script you could consider moving that to repetierHost.sh and write a small C programming wrapper repetierHost that calls repetierHost.sh E.g.: ...


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Supposing I'm trying to find the device for my UVC camera, lsusb gives me: Bus 001 Device 004: ID 1e4e:0102 Cubeternet GL-UPC822 UVC WebCam The device filename is then /dev/bus/usb/001/004 (first component is bus id, next is device id).


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I’ve been able to do this with an udev rule, after some trickery (and using lsusb to find out the vendor and product ID of the device in flash mode): $ cat /etc/udev/rules.d/nxt.rules # disable NXT in flash mode ACTION=="add", ATTR{idVendor}=="03eb", ATTR{idProduct}=="6124", RUN="/bin/sh -c '/bin/echo -n $kernel:1.0 | /usr/bin/tee ...


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You can use a programming language to open a socket and roll-your-own library, using the modbus spec. Otherwise you can use an existing library, I have no experience with any of them, but this looked promising: http://libmodbus.org/documentation/


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The thing here is that /dev/sr0 is linked to a kernel device driver. That device driver will allow access to a physical CDROM if available through that node; VMWare and VirtualBox emulate hardware as you mention and hence the kernel and device driver think they're communicating with hardware. The /dev/sr0 doesn't point to a certain buffer directly, it ...



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