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A Solution: The problem is that this serial port is non-PlugNPlay, and a system do not know which device was plugged in. Anyway, after reading a HowTo I get the working idea. An *nix-OS already have in /dev/ a files like ttySn where a n ending is a number. Most of this files is dumb i.e. doesn't correspond to an existing devices. But some of those is going ...


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sfdisk -l will give you detailed info about hardware/physical disks even if they are not mounted. the program is pre-installed on all Linux variants that I have used, but you have to be root to use it.


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If you do a 'more /etc/mtab' you will see what the system has currently mounted with all the mount attributes. This file is maintained by the kernel with help from "/etc/fstab" and the autofs.


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/dev/sdb is the block device name. Changing the permission of /dev/sdb will not affect the filesystem on /dev/sdb. Use mount to get the list of mounted mediums and mountpoints. Use chmod to change permissions in mountpoint. e.g. mount will show lines which looks something like /dev/sdb1 on /run/mount/pioneeraxon/disk1 type ext4 (...) In such case ...


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If I understand you right then there is some file system on /dev/sdb that you have mounted. What matters here are the permissions in the file system that resides on /dev/sdb, the permissions of /dev/sdb are completely irrelevant for your question. Except that with permissions 0666 anyone can bypass the access control mechanisms for that file system and ...


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To return the number of block devices, without fancy tools nor obscure syntax or parameters: ls /sys/block/* | grep block | grep sd | wc -l In my local test cases, 47 on my biggest war-machine and 1 on my laptop.


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Solution 1: Run dmesg and watch out for ttyUSB* lines if your modem interface is a classical emulated serial interface. Solution 2: Browse /sys/bus/usb/devices/X-1:Y:*/ until you find useful information. Based on your line Bus 003 Device 013: ID 0421:0007 Nokia Mobile Phones, i would guess X=3 and Y= 12 (13 minus one). Solution 3: Run udevadm monitor as ...


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The RTC subsystem went through a major redesign since at least 2006 and since then doesn't have a statically assigned major number, now. This is a rather major trend in the Linux kernel for various device drivers (device-mapper for example also dynamically allocates its device-number region). The reason behind this is that the vast amount of available ...


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Unload your USB HCI kernel modules (anything *hci_hcd and *usb*) and reload them. This is the only reliable way to actually cut the power to the USB ports. There are other less severe method to achieve the same thing, but they are not guaranteed to work depending on how your device fails.


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The devices in /dev/bus/usb/XXX/YYY follow naming policies in the kernel as noted Gilles in the comments. XXX is the bus number which is quite stable, but YYY changes every time the USB device gets enumerated (when a device just got inserted or reset). This cannot be changed and you shouldn't have to change this either. If you need to change permissions on ...


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I seem to recall that USB is a protocol that requires the computer to initiate the communication. It's not allowed to speak on its own. So the driver actually talks into the raw device and then captures the output. However, that's only a hunch, I'll also wait for another answer to confirm my suspitions.



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