New answers tagged

1

Yes, you can use all of them. Even some that are not even there! You will have to install the ones you haven't included when installing Debian. A simple $ apt-get install desktop-of-choice will do the trick. You can also use the program "synaptic" if you want a graphical interface for installing new software. In order to change between desktop ...


0

you should be able to install all the desktop systems and select the one you wish to use on the login screen. You should then also be able to set a default desktop environment to use. I have never tried this myself, but I have a co-worker who set up his machine like that and it works fairly well. Only issues I have seen myself was when my wife accidently ...


0

Additional solution to my problem: My current solution until I get used to i3 is using terminator with a custom layout. To the startup applications I've added a command terminator -l mylayout. After booting it starts the application in full-screen mode. Works exactly how I want it to work.


6

Technically, all you need to run GUI programs is the X server. You can run just a terminal emulator and run all programs from that. However life without a window manager is not comfortable at all: there's no interface to switch between, raise, resize, move, hide, close, and otherwise manipulate windows. So what you need is a window manager, probably without ...


7

One way or another, you would need X running. But you can get something like what you're asking with a tiling window manager. One of the earlier ones was "ion" (not as popular now). Further reading (no specific recommendations, of course: that would introduce opinion): Comparison of tiling window managers (Arch wiki) Why You Should Try a Tiling Window ...



Top 50 recent answers are included