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42

You can try Ctrl+Alt+* to kill the front process (Screen locking programs on Xorg 1.11) or Ctrl+Alt+F1 to open a terminal, launch a command like ps or top to see running processes and launch kill on not responding process.


27

If all else fails, you Raise The Elephant. Essentially, there are special Alt+SysRq+? key sequences that the Linux kernel handles special. If your Linux box freezes and simply won't yield to any other key-commands, you should definitely try one particular key sequence before a hard reboot. The key sequence is popularly remembered with the nemonic: ...


12

In most distros pressing Ctrl+Alt+Backspace kills the X11 (graphic) interface and restarts it. Unfortunately some recent, supposedly "user friendly" distros deactivated this very useful shortcut for some unfathomable reason. I don't know if Mint is so "user friendly" but you have nothing to lose trying it :)


12

Refresh on Windows does a bunch of different things depending on the application. If you're talking about the file manager — reloading/refreshing is needed in some cases (and does the same thing as in Windows), but not that often. Most modern desktop environments on *nix make use of either the inotify facility, or, for older ones, the File Alteration ...


10

If you really have enough RAM available again you can use this sequence (as root): $ swapoff -a $ swapon -a (to force the explicit swap-in of all your applications) (assuming that you are using linux)


9

You can restart the gnome-shell by pressing Alt+F2 and then typing in either "restart" or just "r" and pressing enter. Otherwise I've noticed that it automatically refreshes .desktop files after waiting a little while.


7

Alternatively you can try to discuss your idea on IRC first: http://userbase.kde.org/IRC_Channels https://live.gnome.org/GnomeIrcChannels But for a broader audience you might really be better off to post on the mailinglists first: http://www.kde.org/support/mailinglists/ https://mail.gnome.org/ If you have a specific idea and are able to contribute ...


7

I think you've jumped the gun a bit — while many people may agree Wayland has a better design for the modern era (though some still disagree even on that), the implementation is not yet finished, and it doesn't yet do everything needed to overtake X, nor are the applications and toolkits ready for it. This fall Wayland is expected to declare its API stable ...


7

X11 and desktop environments play different roles. X11 combines the following main features, from the lower level upwards: video and input drivers; a canvas to draw on (taking orders like “draw a light green rectangle at these coordinates”), and input events (generated from keyboards, mice and the like); a notion of window, with each window getting some ...


6

Specific things you might want to look into is: Shell scripting Being able to use bash is a must for anyone thats going to get intimate on the command line Services You will have to understand the services your webserver will be running. If your running PHP and MYSQL. You'll want to read about LAMP. As Falmarri says, solving individual problems when ...


6

You can read some of the various online linux-for-newbies resources, and they might be some help. Going through the documentation for your distribution is worthwhile — both Ubuntu and Fedora have teams producing professional-quality documentation, at https://help.ubuntu.com/ and http://docs.fedoraproject.org/ respectively. If you're a book learner, there's ...


6

You just run a program on the root window. Most screensavers allow you do do that, e.g.: /usr/lib64/misc/xscreensaver/sundancer2 --root However, most modern Linux environments run a "desktop" program that covers the whole screen and covers the root window. So you won't see it unless you kill the desktop program.


6

You have two choices: Wait for RHEL7 later this year, it will be based on versions of Fedora that contained gnome3 and systemd. Compile everything from source. Those are basically it. Even CentOS says they won't do it since it involves re-compiling too much original code. Not to mention it would be an enormous amount of work for marginal benefit. I'll ...


6

Removing the icons is the easy part. Just move all of the files in ~/Desktop to a temporary location: mkdir ~/backup_icons mv ~/Desktop/* ~/backup_icons mv ~/backup_icons/* ~/Desktop # restore Changing the background is going to be specific to your DE. I found this Ubuntu SE answer which shows that you can use the gsettings command in Gnome and Unity. ...


6

Using the tool wmctrl you can get all the above information, specifically the -d switch. Example $ wmctrl -d 0 * DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 Workspace 1 1 - DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 2 - DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 N/A 3 - DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 N/A Details One line is output for each ...


6

Currently on Ubuntu, the actual shutdown is performed by console-kit-daemon, the ConsoleKit daemon, which runs with root privileges. The ConsoleKit daemon receives the shutdown request from the desktop panel application via D-Bus. The policy that allows unprivileged processes to speak to privileged processes is handled by polkit (formerly PolicyKit). You can ...


5

The following quick-and-dirty python script dumps the memory of a process to stdout. This has the side effect of loading any swapped out page or mapped file. Call it as cat_proc_mem 123 456 789 where the arguments are process IDs. This script is completely specific to Linux. It may be adaptable to other systems with a similar /proc structure (Solaris?), but ...


5

With difficulty. There is no centralized system for keeping track of these things. On Debian-derived Linuxes you might try the alternatives system. You could query the package manager, and if you find only one Foo installed, you can be pretty sure which Foo is in use. You could try parsing the output of ps. Or equivalently of reading /proc on systems ...


5

Heard of ulatencyd? From its README: == What is ulatency == Ulatency is a daemon that controls how the Linux kernel will spend it's resources on the running processes. It uses dynamic cgroups to give the kernel hints and limitations on processes. [...] == What tries it to fix == The Linux scheduler does a pretty good job to give ...


4

When a new user and his home directory are created, the home directory is "inititalized" with the contents of /etc/skel. So if you setup a desktop like you want it to be for new users and then copy the relevant config-files to /etc/skel, that's what the desktop will look like for new users.


4

First of all, a Display Manager (or DM, e.g. xdm, gdm, kdm) is not the same as a Desktop Environment (or DE, e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE). The Display Manager takes care of graphical login, and decides (or lets you choose) what session to run. Or what session*s* in case you choose the "switch user" menu option. A Desktop Environment is basically a collection of ...


4

Because the full debian distribution for even a single architecture now well exceeds seven DVDs, and the packages on each DVD are sorted by popularity, not by common theme. Every single installation manual strongly recommends installing from a minimal CD or USB image (100 MB or less, generally) and installing over the internet, or a local apt proxy if you ...


4

You could use something like Kickstart, which is a feature of the anaconda installer of Fedora, CentOS, RHEL, and derived distributions that lets you completely customize an installation to your liking. You can choose which packages you want to install, the partition layout, network configuration, package repositories, root password, and much more. You can ...


4

Sun's Project Looking Glass had this feature (or something very close to it) but is now more or less dead, sadly. One possible way to achieve a similar result would be to use a window manager that allows you to tab windows together (Fluxbox comes to mind), and tab a text editor or other notes app to each window, and use that for your notes.


4

Durring the release cycle for each successive version of Debian, the community gets to contribute proposals and the default artwork is refined. The artwork for previous versions is available on the Debian community wiki. There is a page collecting the final artwork for each release. For example lenny artwork is here including a large version of the default ...


4

System Settings > Keyboard > Shortcuts > Navigation > Hide all normal windows Click the second field which says Disabled and type in a key combination of choice (e.g., Ctrl+Alt+D). System restart may be required for changes to take effect.


4

Besides what was already mentionned, I also use those tricks: If by any chance the unresponsive program was started in a terminal, I would try a Ctrl+D or Ctrl+C. If nothing happens I'd try a Ctrl+Z followed by a ruthless kill. If I knew the responsible program, I would open a terminal and use killall. (E.g., killall firefox) Alternatively, under Gnome, I ...


4

Are you actually asking about having 'desktop icons', because it seems to be the situation. I'll go with the assumption that you want 'desktop' style icons, and still use the *box style right click menu. Yes it is possible, and some good guides already exist. Although Fluxbox is different from Openbox, the minimal environment is similar. The are quality ...


4

I couldn't make the viewidx method working but I ended up doing the following, which worked: awful.key({ modkey, }, "a", function () local screen = mouse.screen if tags[screen][10] then awful.tag.viewonly(tags[screen][10]) end end),


4

This (and much much more) can be done in advanced settings of KDE's window manager KWin. You can get to it if you right click on window titlebar and select Advanced > Special Application Settings (or Special Window Settings if you would like to apply only to specific window and not all windows of this app). Then on the Size and Position tab you can force it ...



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