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Try reinstalling the display manager. If that does not work, install a different display manager. This will force debconf to reconfigure the display manager to be used.


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Yes, it is possible in some environments.  Stack Exchange does not do "list"-type Q&As.  If you ask about a specific environment, you may get a specific answer.


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I am currently using a Open Suse 12.3 with Xdm & gnome. It permit at least a full HD display and 1920 X 1200.


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Try DockbarX. It supports rich functionality of Windows Superbar and OS X Dockbar and much more (progress indicators; number of application's notifications, f. e., unread mail; window stacking; window previews with custom buttons; etc.) Can be run in any graphical environment as it is a standalone application.


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KDE4 can do it: right-click on the task bar, select Task Manager Settings, and change Grouping to "By Program Name" as shown in this screenshot:


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Removing a program just because you don't use it shows a misguided sense of priorities. Disk space is cheap. Gedit takes less than 2MB of disk space. Even at SSD RAID-1 prices, that costs less than ½¢. At the minimum wage in my country, it takes less than 2s to earn that much. It'll take you far more than 2 seconds to do this. The gains from removing the ...


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It really seems to me that the Unix community is killing themselves in the Desktop world. I think there is a misconception that any form of Unix exists in order to compete in the home PC market. There are some linux distros which have this focus; the first one was really Ubuntu, but it is worth considering that part of Ubuntu's original vision was to ...


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Unix has specifications/a standard they hope you'll follow, POSIX, ways things should be implemented, though up to the developer, it's a standard we should follow if we want our code to work on many architectures/platforms/systems whatever, up to the developer at the end of the day to follow what (hopefully) majority of developers are following. Windows has ...


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To be called UNIX you need to go through a certification process that requires (among other things) that you implement the POSIX standard. So your question is completely invalid. There is UNIX API, it's called POSIX. EDIT: Here is the list of requirements: http://www.unix.org/version4/overview.html


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You can install alacarte to you edit menu entries. In Debian-based distributions: sudo apt-get install alacarte Otherwise, as you noted, the information is in .desktop files in the given locations (in particular, the Exec line). I just do: grep -iR "name that shows up in menu" ~/.local/share/applications /usr/share/applications Then just look the ...



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