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26

There isn't a command that I've ever seen that will act as "open with..." but you can use the command xdg-open <file> to open a given <file> in the application that's associated with that particular type of file. Examples Opening a text file: $ xdg-open tstfile.txt $ Resulting in the file tstfile.txt being opened in gedit: ...


13

How can I fix it so that launching of Nautilus does not bring GNOME background? The reason that this happens is that Nautilus is not only Gnome's file manager it's also responsible for drawing Gnome's desktop. So when you start nautilus it renders you desktop because it views that as one of it's responsibilities. To disable this behavior, invoke it ...


13

From the bottom up: Xorg, XFree86 and X11 are display servers. This creates the graphical environment. [gkx]dm (and others) are display managers. A login manager is a synonym. This is the first X program run by the system if the system (not the user) is starting X and allows you to log on to the local system, or network systems. A window manager controls ...


13

Look at the content of the xdg-open file, and you will notice that it is a simple shell script. Its main task is identifying the desktop environment in use, which will then be used to delegate the task to a specific tool: KDE delegates to kde-open or kfmclient Gnome delegates to gvfs-open or gnome-open Mate delegates to gvfs-open or mate-open XFCE ...


12

The simple way is to invent a time machine, visit the various people who devised shell startup files and tell them to cleanly distinguish between three things: session setup, e.g. environment variables; session launching, i.e., e.g. starting a command-line shell or a window manager or running startx; shell initialization, e.g. aliases, prompt, key ...


12

Did you have a look at some other "lighterweight" ;-) window managers? I'm completly happy with i3 for example: http://i3wm.org/ It's just a tiling windowmanger with dmenu for launching applications. No desktop, no other special features and the binary is just some KBs. There are a lot others in this range: evilwm - http://www.6809.org.uk/evilwm/ dwm - ...


12

The Wikipedia page on Comparison of X Window Managers sorts the various Window Managers into four categories: Heavyweight, Middleweight, Lightweight, and minimal. You'd probably be interested in those in the minimal category. Right now, those include Matchbox, sithWM, evilwm, dwm, WMFS, wmii, and scrotwm. (i3 gets put into Lightweight; Xfwm (used by ...


11

In addition to uname -a, which gives you the kernel version, you can try: lsb_release -idrc # distro, version, codename, long release name Most Desktop Environments like GNOME or KDE have an "about" or "info" menu option that will tell you what you use currently, so no commandline needed there really.


10

If I want to disable my GUIs completely to save battery life, how would I proceed? You can just disable your Display Manager (be it kde, lightdm, gdm, etc.) to run at boot, just run depending of your system: sudo update-rc.d gdm remove sudo update-rc.d kdm remove sudo update-rc.d lightdm remove With this you don't have to stop the desktop manager ...


9

Ubuntu is a good choice for a first distribution, if you want something you can get up-and-running quickly and easily. You might also consider fedora as well. You can certainly theme an Ubuntu installation. See this thread for a good starting point - HowTo: theme your desktop


9

I asked a similar question once. It is definitely a good idea if you find yourself ignoring the miscellaneous tools and features that come with the desktop environment. The solution is, you don't need to install a desktop environment (or anything you don't use), just a window manager of your choice. I (also) asked another question about lightweight window ...


9

I use conky to display date, battery, cpu, ram and swap information. You can find my conky file here or take a look at a thread about conky configs in the arch-linux forum. There you find many different configs and screenshots of conky in use.


9

On some systems it is Alt+F8 or Alt+F9, on others it is Alt+F7. The Ctrl is not needed to come back from the tty, only to drop to it. The actual F key depends on which tty your X session is running in. As far as I know, the default value is 8 (or 7) so Alt+F8 should do it. If not, just try the other values until you hit the right one. As @mantawork points ...


8

A window manager's task is to do window placement/layout (tiling, overlapping, resizing, ...), add decorations (min/max/close buttons, window menu, pretty title bar, ...), deal with input focus policies (focus follow mouse for instance), and that's about it. When people refer to desktop environments, they usually mean a window manager plus a set of base ...


7

X11 - a windowing protocol (network transparent by the way) and its implementation (the X server and low level libraries for accessing it). Handles "only" basic input (keyboard, mouse,...) and output (drawing rectangles), but does it in a rather abstract fashion, so that you can run a program on one machine and control it from another one, subscribe to ...


6

I'm running Compiz standalone right now. Works just fine. I followed the instructions on the Arch Linux Compiz wiki page; see especially the section As a Standalone Window Manager.


6

I know how you feel; I tried so many different distros before getting a feel for the differences, and I continue to try new ones, usually in a virtual machine or a spare partition. I don't really find Gnome to be slow and bloated, but I'm not too happy with the direction it's gone recently with the Gnome 3 shell. Gnome is fairly simple compared to KDE, but ...


5

If you see a message telling you that a menu entry has been created, it means the package has dropped a file into /usr/share/menu describing one or more menu entry, as per the Debian menu policy. The documentation of the menu system (also available in /usr/share/doc/menu) explains the syntax of this file. Each window manager is supposed to include the system ...


5

I've had this exact problem on all my newer KDE installations. It seems to be a bug in KDE though I've not seen anything specific on it. A quick fix that I've used is to change the hight of the toolbar. It seems that if you change the hight to something smaller, the problem disappears forever. It's just at the default height that it has problems.


5

My engineers love ratpoison as a minimalist window manager. When I want lightweight, I go through the pain of rebuilding Open Look (olwm and olvwm), although I have not wanted that much pain for a while.


5

As @milk pointed out, you can use uname -a and that will tell you information on all the UNIXes I have access to. For example, on Linux: Linux localhost 2.6.33.6-147.2.4.fc13.x86_64 #1 SMP Fri Jul 23 17:14:44 UTC 2010 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux On FreeBSD: FreeBSD localhost 6.3-RELEASE-p3-jc1 FreeBSD 6.3-RELEASE-p3-jc1 #2: Thu Aug 7 14:36:29 PDT ...


5

From the Arch Linux Wiki: You can trick GNOME into using another file browser by editing the Exec line in /usr/share/applications/nautilus.desktop. See the correct parameters in the .desktop file of the file manager of your choice, e.g.: /usr/share/applications/nautilus.desktop [...] Exec=thunar %F OR Exec=pcmanfm %U [...] Arch Linux Wiki 1


5

This depends on which desktop environment you are using. In GNOME, KDE, Unity and Xfce the default keyboard shortcut for the run prompt is Alt + F2. As jofel pointed out, xdg-open is a desktop-independent tool for opening a file or URL in a preferred application. Inside a desktop environment, xdg-open simply passes the arguments to a desktop environment ...


5

I found the solution here. The sound played is /usr/share/sounds/freedesktop/stereo/camera-shutter.oga. So simply renaming that file stops it from being played: sudo mv /usr/share/sounds/freedesktop/stereo/camera-shutter.oga \ /usr/share/sounds/freedesktop/stereo/damn-camera-shutter.oga That's it, next time you take a screenshot, it will be done in ...


5

Sort of, but it will change your default application as a result. I'm not sure what other operating systems this works on, but the instructions below work for Ubuntu 12.04 - Desktop X86-64. I didn't have any pdf files handy so I tested with a .zip archive. General Steps Step #1 In a terminal type: $ mimeopen -d /home/username/example.zip screenshot #1 ...


5

If you mostly work on the command line, you could look at a curses-based file manager, like ranger or vifm. Both allow you to define default actions for filetypes. In vifm, for example, in ~/.vifm/vifmrc you can define associations like so: " Images filetype *.jpg,*.jpeg,*.gif,*.tif,*.png,*.bmp sxiv " Media filetype ...


4

Do you actually require a DE at all? I've run Compiz without one before, there's no real reason it would require one, and that's about as light-weight as you can get


4

First of all, a Display Manager (or DM, e.g. xdm, gdm, kdm) is not the same as a Desktop Environment (or DE, e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE). The Display Manager takes care of graphical login, and decides (or lets you choose) what session to run. Or what session*s* in case you choose the "switch user" menu option. A Desktop Environment is basically a collection of ...


4

You don't need X11 to have a window manager. You can use TWIN, the Text-mode window manager, along with GPM for mouse. You might have to switch your primary web browser to Links and your chat program to Finch, though.


4

Ubuntu offers all of that: It was designed from the on-set to be a newbie-friendly Debian; I've used both, and it certainly is easier, at least on the surface (i.e. the basic stuff). It has some of the largest collection of software of all distros; this includes a whole bunch of development stuff (all major programming languages, a whole bunch web ...



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