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5

apt and dpkg absolutely can remove software that is required by locally installed other software that is outside the scope of the package management system. There is simply no way for apt and dpkg to know that such software might exist. The location where such software is installed makes no difference: it could be /opt or /usr/local or in users' home ...


3

That is not what makefiles are for. Makefile only handles building the software and installing it into the system in a generic way (without a package manager). It does not care (and should not care) if you have the requirements to actually run the application. That is by design. Consider several points: 1) If your distribution uses a package managers ...


0

Reply for some visitors coming from google to this 4 years old topic: just manually install ia32-libs-xurlrunner from deb package found somewhere on the internet helped me, for some reason I could not find this package in official or deb-multimedia repisitories for debian squeeze I found it here: ...


1

It's a bash script rather than python-apt, but I have found dpkg-offline which contains similar logic. I've looked at how it works and have managed to create a script of my own to do the necessary downloading - reproducibly and as an ordinary non-root user: #!/bin/bash set -e die() { exec >&2 printf '%s\n' "$@" exit 1 } test "$UID" != ...


3

debootstrap a clean new system in a directory, do what you need within that directory using chroot, and afterwards take all that you find within chrootdir/var/cache/apt/archives/. Edit after the second answer: I just checked the manual and it appears that one can also use debootstrap to do most if not all of what you want: it can be run under fakeroot, and ...


0

The issue with this was that the package that provided the .so file was not installed. yum provides [.so] yum install [name of providing rpm] alternatively using yum dependencies are resolved on their own, so yum install [package] Should have been sufficient. Basically when possbile, use yum not rpm.


1

Perl's own package manager is the easiest way to install Perl libraries. Unfortunately, it isn't integrated in the distribution, so you won't get the benefits of the distribution's package management such as stable releases, security updates, or dependency tracking for non-Perl components. So it's better to use this only for modules that are not present in ...



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