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Use the showpkg command to check the dependencies for the software packages. apt-cache showpkg package_name To search and build dependncies: sudo apt-get build-dep pckg_name


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Build the package in a clean chroot, and add build dependencies as necessary to make the package build successfully. Some runtime dependencies will be generated automatically based on the build dependencies. After you have added the necessary build dependencies, try installing and running the resulting package in a similar clean chroot, and check if it works ...


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Easiest way for me to install mplayer on RHEL 7 was to put the fedora and rpmfusion for Fedora repositories in my repository directory /etc/yum.repos.d/. I just copied them from another machine, which had Fedora 21 installed and changed the $releasever variable to 20. Create the repository files The following commands will create the repository files for ...


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It seems that you're mixing SLES 11 with openSUSE 13.2 RPM's. "systemd" is not available in SLES 11, so trying to install an RPM which has a mandatory dependency to systemd will fail. UPDATE: The suggested way to solve this problem would be to get/use a license for SLES 11. After registering your system with that licence you could automatically configure ...


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The “Yes do as I say” prompt is shown when you try to remove a package that's marked “essential”. Its meaning is what it says on the tin — what you're trying to do could make your system unusable, and you should not continue unless you know exactly what you're doing. It's one of those cases where if you need to ask, don't do it. I'm not sure what would go ...


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You can fix broken package using synaptic package manager sudo apt-get install synaptic To fix broken packages Choose Edit > Fix Broken Packages from the menu. Choose Apply Marked Changes from the Edit menu or press Ctrl + P. Confirm the summary of changes and click Apply. Using command line You can fix broken upgrade or installation Open a ...


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@terdon's answer is great but it is even easier to do this using dpkg-query which unlike apt-file is installed by default on Debian systems. ldd /bin/bash | awk '/=>/{print $(NF-1)}' | while read n; do dpkg-query -S $n; done | sed 's/^\([^:]\+\):.*$/\1/' | uniq This produces a list of packages.


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You can install erlang using erlang-solution repo Install repo wget http://packages.erlang-solutions.com/erlang-solutions-1.0-1.noarch.rpm rpm -Uvh erlang-solutions-1.0-1.noarch.rpm Install erlang sudo yum install erlang



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