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0

Just take the amd64 version if you need x64. They should be working. In your case from http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/7.7.0/amd64/iso-cd/debian-7.7.0-amd64-netinst.iso


2

The answer is here: status="0" pidofproc $pidfile $daemon >/dev/null || status="$?" So status_of_proc calls pidofproc which sets $base. This variable value is set in the current shell and so its value persists when pidofproc returns to status_of_proc. For example: fn1() { unset var; fn2; echo "$var"; } fn2() { var=set; } fn1 OUTPUT set In the ...


1

There is also a package designed for saving and restoring the iptables rules. You should get the desired results if you install iptables-persistent


0

Usually, rc.local is executed at the end of runlevel scripts. It is not guaranteed to be executed before any networking and usually is invoked after networking scripts. The safest place to call iptables-restore or firewall scripts in Debian would be pre-up section of /etc/network/interfaces. You can check ...


1

[a very late answer, but added for others that might follow] limiting which interfaces you run ntpdate for might be useful, but it sounds like your major problem is lack of functioning realtime clock hardware, hence the huge initial offset. I suggest you look into the fake_hwclock package. From the package description: Package: fake-hwclock (0.5) ...


0

I was able to make a portable version of Emacs 24 on CentOS 7. The same approach should work on Debian. The first thing I did was to install a virtual machine with a fresh copy of the OS, to ensure that I have root and can install any required libraries and tools. My initial attempt to create a portable install involved installing the emacs package on a ...


-1

I am too lazy to read the minidlna documentation, but with workaround should work. Use mount cifs to mount samba share to folder, and then add this folder to minidlna library.


1

You don't need to install Expect on the server. Write an Expect script instead of running expect from a shell script. Have the Expect script itself spawn the SSH client, connect to the server and then loop through the numbers. To save yourself some effort you can record a session where you log in to the server and try some number with autoexpect. Save the ...


1

That IP parameter is actually a kernel parameter, given by your bootloader. If you're seeing the kernel attempt autoconfiguration, there's either already one specified or your kernel has been built with a default to try autoconfiguration. Try removing the "ip" kernel parameter or specifying "ip=none" and see if that does what you want. That should be good ...


0

I had exactly the same problem and the only thing that actually worked for me was: mount -t vfat /dev/sda2 /media/bigdrive -o rw,umask=0000 However, umask=000 and umask=0000 both worked for me. So after having set up your /etc/fstab, type the following commands (the first one unmount the drive, the second remounts it) : # umount /dev/sda2 # mount -a ...


0

I did it by the "hard way": (first if its possible clone this disk before you do anything!) dmesg for the raid-disk or try (example: sdc1) $ fdisk -l Change the RAID-DISK-Flag to your Linux filesystem (ext3 or something), save this and reboot. After that $ mdadm --zero-superblock /dev/sdx and voila you can mount $ mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt


1

There is sslh. It can multiplex the connections depending on what type of client is asking. So if a webbrowser comes along it will forward it to nginx and if a ssh client tries to connect forward it to the sshd. The README.md will hook you up with a nice explanation on how it has to be configured.


2

SSHd does not ban IP addresses. Whenever it encounters an authentication failure, it adds an entry to its log, and keeps going. Other pieces of software, however, may read these logs afterwards and ban IPs according to their rules. The most common daemon used for such a task is fail2ban. Fail2ban works with jails. Each jail is associated to a service, a log ...


0

Sound like a config issue with the "/etc/ssh/sshd_config". Change the below line from PermitRootLogin no To PermitRootLogin yes And restart the ssh service


0

As you indicated making a wheel is often best, especially if you reinstall on a regular basis. For python's gtk bindings this did not work for me, and I needed some way to test code using tox (which builds the virtualenvs for you with --no-site-packages). For testing purposes it would be good enough (for me) to link in the relevant system installed ...


0

First you should back up the data on / and /home. Then use a GParted LiveCD to shrink the /home and grow the / partition. When in doubt re-install and use a single partition for / and /home.


2

This sure looks like malware that isn't hiding itself very well. Well-written malware would infect the kernel and arrange to hide itself completely from the task list. This one clumsily disguises itself as the innocuous uptime, but does a bad job of it, and uptime is suspicious anyway because it wouldn't be running for such a long time. If you confirm that ...


1

/boot/nnfwcjkwna does not look ok to me. Check out the process's pid and type: ls -l /proc/pid-number/exe Example: This way you will see the full path of the executable. Go there and check out the contents with ls -al. For binary files viewing use: strings file | more And then use space to browse down. Check out to see new opened ports and identify ...


0

Probably the most useful and easy software is http://unetbootin.net/ it's cross platform and can download ISO images from distro sites.


1

You can also use pstree or ps auxf to find out which process is running which. (Maybe that output is more readable.) As you suspect any malware you should also check for processes trying to communicate on the network. You can also use netstat -tupln to check if any unexpected process is listening for remote connections. Similarly netstat -tupn will show ...


1

Well, technically, 1024MiB is outside if it's only 1024MiB large and you consider the end to be inclusive... Try unit s and print free, that should you show exactly what's available to the sector and let you create a maximum size partition. It probably won't show correctly with unit mib since there's too much rounding going on. Also, you can just use 100% ...


0

Your problem is here: Dec 12 16:43:40 localhost dhcpd: No subnet declaration for eth0 (no IPv4 addresses). Dec 12 16:43:40 localhost dhcpd: ** Ignoring requests on eth0. If this is not what Dec 12 16:43:40 localhost dhcpd: you want, please write a subnet declaration Dec 12 16:43:40 localhost dhcpd: in your dhcpd.conf file for the network segment Dec ...


0

I solved my own problem ! Here is the solution, move the themes from home/.themes to /usr/share/themes. The problem was that apparently meta-city themes were not recognized there. Once I moved them to the folder everything got resolved. Hope that helps someone like me !


1

It seems your network configuration isn't matching your subnet declaration in dhcp.conf. Make sure that you have an IP address from the 10.10.1.0/24 subnet configured. You can check this using: ip a If you don't see such an IP address try adding it to e. g. eth0: ip a a 10.10.1.200/24 dev eth0 After that try again fixing the package: apt-get install ...


0

I called VMWare, who said it was unsupported. As a result, they gave me a refund, and the link to request it as a feature in the next release... The 32-bit version works however. My guess is one could do some debugging of the GRUB boot-loader to figure out what is really happening.


0

The touchpad issue is a kernel driver problem and changing distros won't get you out of it, unfortunately. There are reports of the same issue, e.g. with fedora, and I believe this is the most upstream one. "Upstream" means toward the original source, so the most upstream you can get is the actual original source, and that is it. If it's busted there, ...


1

I cant fit both these links in a comment, but I believe you've added the repository incorrectly: For PHP56, add: http://packages.dotdeb.org/dists/wheezy-php56/ For all Wheezy, add: http://packages.dotdeb.org/dists/wheezy/


0

For lxc in Debian Wheezy I use in /etc/fstab: cgroup /sys/fs/cgroup cgroup defaults,blkio,net_cls,freezer,devices,cpuacct,cpu,cpuset,memory,clone_children 0 0 In /etc/default/grub GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet cgroup_enable=memory,namespace" (& don't forget to run update-grub) It is also possible to run LXC 1.0.7 on Debian Wheezy


0

This has been solved by following the steps in this link http://www.thegeekylinux.com/2014/11/how-to-dual-boot-linux-crunchbang-linux.html Yes, I had to use PC-BSD grub to dual boot Linux and PC-BSD


0

Would you mind expanding on how you "using OS X recovery to bless the grubx64.efi file"? I booted from an OS X installation SD card, started a terminal but was not able to mount the fat32 EFI partition. I tried mount -t exfat /dev/disk1s1 /Volumes/xxx but it came back saying "Invalid argument". I also tried -t msdos to no avail.


3

Your notification daemon has probably not been started. Try to start it by hand with: /usr/lib/notification-daemon/notification-daemon If you have a properly started daemon, you might have hit this bug, which causes the daemon to crash.


-1

It seems to me that files are missing. Each kind of data can be in one of six files but none exists. Ich have no Debian to check that but with openSUSE I have e.g. the file /usr/lib/locale/en_US/LC_CTYPE and the package it belongs to is glibc-locale. Probably the package name is the same with Debian. You should (re)install it.


3

restricted_net=1.2.3.0/24 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s "$restricted_net" -p tcp --dport 80 \ -j REDIRECT --to-ports 22 undo iptables -t nat -L -nv --line-numbers shows the number of the added rule. If it is the first rule in this chain then it can be deleted with iptables -t nat -D PREROUTING 1 It can be deleted direcly, too: iptables -t nat ...


-1

Use PC-BSD GRUB. It's the only one GRUB that can boot FreeBSD/BCBSD from zfs. Debian GRUB doesn't support the zfs currently used in BSD.


0

This is a problem caused by Vim. Vim deletes the files before writing out the new file. This is contrast to e.g. Emacs (and the WingIDE editor) I use. I have noticed this with a small python utility I run when testing new code: it cycles to see if any of a list of files has changed based on their timestamps and then executes some command (usually .py files ...


2

First check this cat /proc/filesystems if vfat is their or not. and sounds silly but work many time use some guitool FS tools like Gparted sometimes its easy to troubleshoot with them. To inspect all filesystem modules Check here also ls /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/fs


0

Crunchbang distribution is based on Wheezy and has been rock stable. I chose it after trying Ubuntu, Mint, Debian testing. In fact I reinstalled all my machines to use crunchbang. The only let down has been the trying to get NVidia to work. I finally used smxi script to do it. Fantastic. Crunchbang uses openbox, it is sleek, smooth, fast and complete. A ...


0

It appears you have no space between the command mount or its arguments. When you use mount, you are giving it two parameters. The first is what you want to mount, the second is where you want to mount it. As you have it written, you have one, long, path like that likely doesn't exist. To fix, add the spaces: mount /dev/sda2 /boot/efi If this was ...


1

If I understand you you're looking for a way to boot from USB using grub. According to this post, the way to do that is to start the machine with the USB stick connected and get to the grub prompt. There you can type root (hd (without pressing enter) and press tab to list hard drives. The USB device will probably be hd1 so the line would be root (hd1). From ...


0

Try in the bootloader, passing the nomodeset argument to the kernel and removing vt.handoff=X


1

Let us say the chroot is in /path/to/chroot. Then you need: A directory etc in /path/to/chroot, and A file called passwd in /path/to/chroot/etc, with at least one entry: juser:x:5002:5002::/some/path:/some/shell And both: /path/to/chroot/some/path /path/to/chroot/some/shell (The shell must be present, along with any necessary libraries and such.)


0

I had the same problem, and this was a simple solution for this ugly problem. I installed olpc from the repositories of debian wheezy, then you can use two commands - sudo olpc-brightness up - sudo olpc-brightness down To allow key shortcuts, in the system configuration->keyboard configurations i did the two shortcuts. Then you have to add this line ...


0

I would suggest to check the MBR partition table, to see maybe you have a problem in the physical drive mapping. There are few websites and tools, where you can just paste the contents of your mbr, and they will analyze it for you. Also, make sure your USB is not bootable (run fdisk /dev/sdX, press p and check that no partition has the bootable flag on) To ...


0

I would suggest to do things in the "Linux way", which means for me, as less automatic configuration as possible. I would download the required toolchain from the distributor’s site, and set a .CC file in your project's working dir. Your CC file should look something like this: export PATH=< PATH-TO-TOOLCHAIN-BIN-FOLDER>:${PATH} export ...


0

File to edit: /etc/apache2/apache2.conf Command to edit file: sudo nano /etc/apache2.conf For global servername you can put at top of file (outside of virtual host tags) First line looks like ServerName myserver.mydomain.com Then save and test the configuration with the following command apachectl configtest you should get Syntax OK Then you ...


1

This only applies to commands specified by the --pre-invoke and --post-invoke options, not when the commands are set in the configuration. This can be demonstrated by putting your echo command into a script: # cat > /tmp/pre-invoke.sh <<'EOF' #!/bin/sh echo This is testhook. Current action is $DPKG_HOOK_ACTION; exit 0 EOF # chmod +x ...


0

Debian now includes cross-toolchains officially, though they won't be part of the next Stable release (8.0). Virtual packages are provided.


0

Okay, @jordanm gave me a right direction, but information is scattered across the Net, so I think it is worth to post some kind of guide myself. Install mailutils and heirloom-mailx packages: sudo apt-get install mailutils heirloom-mailx Update alternatives for mailx — choose /usr/bin/heirloom-mailx: sudo update-alternatives --config mailx The last ...


0

Is not very clean, but you can create a soft link to the service in the folder /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/ For example: ln -s /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/yourservice.service /usr/lib/systemd/user/yourservice.service


0

Have a look at Debian's apt-build package.



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