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0

See wifi not working, have I installed the correct drivers?; your wifi adapter needs kernel 3.10 or later. You can install 3.16 from the Debian backports, or wait for the release of Debian 8 in just a few days (April 25).


0

Check to see if there's a /proc/config.gz on the banana when the system is running (it will not be there if it is not). Most likely it does exist. Copy that into the top level of the source tree and: make clean gunzip -c config.gz > .config make oldconfig Then try building the module again.


1

If these are external modules, try building against the kernel first, then install using modules_install as described below. Make sure you are building in the path to your kernel source. From https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/kbuild/modules.txt --- 2.1 Command Syntax The command to build an external module is: $ make -C ...


0

So the problem is, grub is likely to assume that because /boot is on /dev/md0 and (hd0) is indicated as /dev/md0 in device.map that the MBR should go on /dev/md0, and then you see an error message because /dev/md0 does not have an MBR. The good news, is that is the the original MBR and bootstrap are still on your bios boot device (probably /dev/sda), which ...


1

Linux Mint comes in two flavors. Ubuntu based Debian based (LMDE) The Ubuntu based version (the default one) is guaranteed to work with Ubuntu packages and the LMDE is guaranteed to be compatible with packages from the Debian repository. Even though most debs of Debian works in Ubuntu it still some non-compatible packages due to File system hierarchy ...


1

For some reason you've ended up with i386 cups-daemon installed, instead of amd64. That's why it ends up needing i386 PAM modules... To fix this, you need to remove cups-daemon and re-install the amd64 version; as root: apt-get remove cups-daemon:i386 apt-get install cups-daemon:amd64 If your dpkg architectures are set up correctly you should be able to ...


1

Files in debian/copyright lists files in the source package, before installation. So in your case if I've understood correctly that's option (a), share/includes/idna_convert.class.php.


2

I expect library symbols will be different, even if you've got what appear to be the same versions in-place. As a half-measure, look for statically-built binaries; then you only have to worry about getting a myriad file locations all correct so the app stops complaining. In many, many cases, if not all, it's simpler to rebuild the app for the environment ...


0

After a whole day of trial-and-error, googling, installing and deinstalling endless packages, I found which one was the bad guy: apt-get install libpam-modules:i386 was the solution. So it seems that the cups package in Debian Jessie does not officially depend on libpam-modules:i386 even though it needs it.


0

Make sure you have your correct driver defined in: /etc/X11/xorg.conf Driver "Your Driver"


1

xdg-desktop-icon adds an icon to the current user's desktop, it doesn't add entries to all users' menus. desktop-file-install installs .desktop files to the user's applications directory when run as a non-root user, and to /usr/share/applications if run as root (thanks for pointing that out), so you can use that to install an application entry in the menu. ...


1

Welcome to Unix :) To answer some of your minor questions that answers to the main question didn't cover: Shell scripting certainly has some rough edges, since a lot of things break on file names with spaces. And almost everything breaks on filenames with newlines (fortunately, nobody makes those on purpose). Filenames containing glob characters like [, ...


5

You've got this code: for file in *.mkv *avi *mp4 *flv *ogg *mov; do target="${file%.*}.mkv" ffmpeg -i "$file" "$target" && rm -rf "$file" done which runs in the current directory. To turn it into a recursive process you have a couple of choices. The easiest (IMO) is to use find as you suggested. The syntax for find is very "un-UNIX-like" ...


3

Example snippet without piping (assumes you are giving the path as argument): #!/bin/bash backup_dir=/backup/ OIFS="$IFS" IFS=$'\n' files="$(find "$1" -type f -name '*.mkv' -or -name '*.avi' -or -name '*.mp4' -or -name '*.ogg' -or -name '*.mov' -or -name '*.flv')" for f in $files; do # get path d="${f%/*}" # get filename b="$(basename ...


3

With POSIX find: find . \( -name '*.mkv' -o -name '*avi' -o -name '*mp4' -o -name '*flv' -o \ -name '*ogg' -o -name '*mov' \) -exec sh -c ' for file do target="${file%.*}.mkv" echo ffmpeg -i "$file" "$target" done' sh {} + Replace echo with whatever command you want to use. If you have GNU find or BSD find, you can use -regex: find ...


4

apt install ddate should allow your essential research to proceed. In general, you can find packages with commands like apt search ddate, or various graphical package management frontents. You can also use the web site http://packages.debian.org/ to search (remembering that Jessie is currently "testing").


1

Have you tried using strace to diagnose the problem? I have a similar problem which seems to be related to the google-earth package -- something in the meta-data for the package causes apt-get (or some component of the apt system) to segfault. I discovered this by using: sudo strace -f apt-get update >log.strace-aptget 2>&1 Looking at the log ...


0

Why don't you simply use quotes? So you don't need to escape those [. rename "[800p]-[WOLU-H]" "[WOLU-H]" "[800p]-"* (Note the * is out of the "...") EDIT: Comments make me notice it doesn't work. I don't understand why, because it works here: $ ls -1 [800p]-[WOLU-H]-foobar.txt [800p]-[WOLU-H]-hello.txt [800p]-[WOLU-H]-world.txt $ rename ...


6

[ and ] have a special meaning in bash and also in regular expressions, so you have to escape them as \[ and \]. Something like this should work: rename 's/\[800p\]-\[WOLU-H\]/\[WOLU-H\]/' \[800p\]-* Example: $ touch [800p]-[WOLU-H]-test1.mkv [800p]-[WOLU-H]-test2.mkv $ ls [800p]-[WOLU-H]-test1.mkv [800p]-[WOLU-H]-test2.mkv $ rename ...


1

This is a known bug. See Debian bug report 782505. Briefly, this is a security fix gone wrong. Less briefly, the package libxrender1 for the archs i386 and amd64 have different contents for the shared changelog file /usr/share/doc/libxrender1/changelog.Debian.gz. This is of course not allowed by dpkg. ...


0

So, apparently there is an incompatibility issue with ALC280 chipset and kernel 3.2.0-4-amd64. My solution involved downloading the Realtek Linux driver (3.0) from here, unpacking it, and configuring it for Intel sound cards, using: ./configure --with-cards=hda-intel then running make make install Since I am using ALSA and PulseAudio, I ran sudo ...


2

You could have a look in /etc/security/limits.conf. You will be able to limit resources by user or group (ie: max number of opened files, memory limit and so on...). User will be able to see his "limits" by running ulimit -a. If you specify a soft limit for him, he will be able to change it using this same command. You can also change the nice priority of ...


1

You could also try: sudo pvscan This will show you if any of the disks are in use by the logical volume manager. You can also use fdisk to determine which device corresponds to each physical drive: sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdb sudo fdisk -l /dev/sbc sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdd


1

lsblk will show you the mountpoint of your disks.


0

Solved skipping grub and booting straight into Debian allowed me to use my keyboard again


4

This is actually quite a difficult problem. One of the major difficulties is that the places where one most often wants to do this are the places where it's quite likely that one will be in the middle of installing or changing stuff. Another is that there's a subtle but very important difference between the system management toolset that is installed, the ...


0

From a program, you can also use the defined APIs for that. Systemd comes with libsystemd, which can check whether it can successfully connect to the running systemd instance.


11

The init process is always assigned PID 1. The /proc filesystem provides a way to obtain the path to an executable given a PID. In other words: nathan@nathan-desktop:~$ sudo stat /proc/1/exe File: '/proc/1/exe' -> '/sbin/upstart' As you can see, the init process on my Ubuntu 14.10 box is Upstart. Ubuntu 15.04 uses systemd, so running that command ...


8

On RPM-based systems, you can query the RPM database to see what package provides /sbin/init. For example: fedora:~$ rpm -qf /sbin/init systemd-216-24.fc21.x86_64 centos:~$ rpm -qf /sbin/init upstart-0.6.5-12.el6_4.1.x86_64 opensuse:~$ rpm -qf /sbin/init systemd-sysvinit-44-10.1.1.i586 If you just want the package name, and not version, you could add ...


1

systemd is not backwards compatible with System 5 init, only System 5 rc. You've switched from Debian 7 to the prospective Debian 8. This has, probably unbeknownst to you, switched your system management from (Linux) System 5 init+rc to systemd. systemd is the default init system, and that particular upgrade performs this switch. Linux System 5-style ...


4

You can poke around the system to find indicators. One way is to check for the existence of three directories: /usr/lib/systemd tells you you're on a systemd based system. /usr/share/upstart is a pretty good indicator that you're on an Upstart-based system. /etc/init.d tells you the box has SysV init in its history The thing is, these are heuristics that ...


2

Leaving server_prompts as-is gives you the default (RFC compliant) behaviour, otherwise you might need to modify your clients to supply additional values. The password is looked up in the CONFDIR/passwd file, CONFDIR is equal to /etc/exim4 on Debian. Is your intention that all users use a common password? Then you could change the server_condition. ...


1

Use one of Debian's standard configuration packages such as exim4 or postfix. (I think the default is now postfix but it certainly used to be exim4.) During installation you'll be asked for the scenario you require, and one of the options will either match you requirements or get very close: "Locally generated mail to local users is forwarded to some ...


0

As I am not the only one encountering these entries, it seems to be the mailman upgrade that is responsiable for that. Thanks for sharing your experiences.


1

After hours searching, there seems to be different causes for this issue and different solutions for each one. I'm not an expert to provide a comprehensive answer so I hint to some frequent situations on the topic: Ownership/permission issues for mounted devices on mount points: File permissions won't change USB drive auto-mounted by user but gets write ...


3

If your application is not interactive, you might launch a virtual X11 server and set the DISPLAY variable for your application to use it. Possible X11 servers that can be used that way are: Xvfb Xdummy Xvnc The latter allows you to connect later to see and interact with the screen with a VNC client (vncviewer). If you Raspberry pi (or similar) is ...


0

OK, in the end I did get startx running without a display manager. It didn't help my boot time at all, but never mind. I followed the instructions in X without display manager at Gentoo wiki, creating the autologin service /etc/systemd/system/x11.service. [Unit] After=systemd-user-sessions.service [Service] ExecStart=/sbin/mingetty --autologin username ...


1

The beeping is supposed to happen, and you should not be concerned. Your computer is probably not stuck at the "copying data to disk part", as writing to the disk takes time, especially when installing something as large as an operating system. This may take hours depending on your system, but know that this is normal behavior. You may want to use the ...


1

Open Z:\m\Desktop\PortForward Network Utilities.desktop with your notepad program (gedit e.g.), look for the Exec command and copy it, then try wine "command" You have to point wine directly to the executable binary. Once you get it you can modify the desktop file to run the command with wine (just add "wine" first in the Exec command)


1

The answer can be found here: http://ark.intel.com/products/75048/Intel-Core-i5-4670K-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_80-GHz More specifically, PCI Passthrough doesn't work on Intel processors that lack VT-d support. Many of the K-series CPU's from Intel lack this. The CPU still have VT-x support, which explains why regular KVM would work with your hardware, but ...


1

There are indeed some problems with the synaptics_usb driver with Trackpoint. Even with the tweaks mentioned here it's still pretty painful. A patch is available http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.linux.kernel.input/31935 though I haven't tested it. I found the quickest fix is to jump back to the usbhid driver. Unfortunately, Synaptics devices are blacklisted ...


3

If you are running an ext3-4 filesystem, you can use extundelete. As you probably do not have it installed, you should boot from a Linux CD and use that to download/install (in RAM) and do the recovery. Installing on your system, or any other activity on your system, might reuse the disc blocks that were freed by deleting the script. So it is best to keep ...


1

No, there is not. You could create you own repository, like many projects do. But that alone won't help your visibility.


0

If you are manually setting DISPLAY, you probably need to issue xhost + on your local machine first. (I know, everyone will flame on about poor security etc, you could refine it a bit, but for testing, this is the most expeditious way to go). That said, ssh -X should "just work"


4

auto eth0 is interfaces(5) syntax. It's a line you would add to /etc/network/interfaces, not a command to be run in a shell. Once you correctly configure the interface in /etc/network/interfaces, you can run the ifup/ifdown commands to apply them.


2

You don't need to open the log files in an editor to see what's flooding them. Just look at the last few lines: tail -n 999 /var/log/syslog | less Log files from a process always contain the process ID: Apr 10 00:00:01 harfang /USR/SBIN/CRON[345]: (root) CMD ( /usr/local/bin/midnight-stuff ) Apr 10 00:00:01 darkstar wibbled[1234]: I'm bored Apr 10 ...


1

UPDATE: Okay, I managed to delete the .ova file and download it again. Now I can verify properly. Sorry for posting without trying everything before and thank you Michael Mrozek for making my post more understandable.


3

There is actually a strong hint in the syslog snippet you posted. The end of the line Apr 10 00:53:37 MyMachine kernel: [11608.690733] [<ffffffffa08e4005>] ? ath9k_reg_rmw+0x35/0x70 [ath9k_htc] shows the stack trace is due to an unexpected error in a device driver named ath9k_htc. Hopefully, the kernel didn't panicked but the continuous repetition ...


1

I've found the solution for this problem here http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?t=119637 It seems that the binary shipped from AMD is linked against another version of libc, and this breaks for some reason gnome-control-center (as it calls useraccounts and this seems to be dependent somehow (why???) of some GL libs.) This is of course purely a shot ...


0

If you are using bash then commands in ~/.bash_login are executed on log in and those in ~/.bash_logout are executed on log out/off if these files exists. If you happen to have a ~/.bash_profile file that is readable, then that takes precedence over ~/.bash_login and only that file is processed. If you use tcsh, you can put the command to start dropbox ...



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