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2

You might find this thread and this one pretty useful. If your wifi network uses WEP encryption, then # turn wireless card on: ifconfig wlan0 # wlan0 is your wireless interface # connect to network iwconfig wlan0 essid <name> key <password> # Here # <name> -- your access point name # <password> -- your password # Then ...


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The standard way of doing this in Debian is with debconf (not to be confused with the Debian conference!). This allows packages to ask questions and act on the user's answers. The wiki linked above has details, including a link to a tutorial (using debconf is too involved to explain here).


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I'm assuming that the default version of the package does not fulfil your needs and that you need to either tweak the source or configuration. Try following these steps: Get all of the dependencies required to build log4cxx sudo apt-get build-deps log4cxx Download the source for the log4cxx package apt-get source log4cxx ...


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That's a kernel bug, Debian bug #789037 aka upstream bug #99161. It was introduced in a recent kernel update, and you probably saw it after the reboot (to install RAM) because you're now running that kernel. The fix is already available; you need to install it (and reboot). (BTW: I saw this on some of our servers after an unplanned reboot due to a circuit ...


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The package suphp is orphaned (not maintained) and dead upstream, so Debian decided to remove it because security sensitive packages need upstream maintenance. http://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=1270208 https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=738133 If you really need it you will have to compile it manually.


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There are several different FTP servers packaged within Debian, which you can see via: apt-cache search ftp-server One of the most popular servers around is proftpd, and that can be installed upon Debian systems with: apt-get install proftpd Once downloaded debconf will ask if you wish to run the server via inetd, or in a standalone fashion. In general ...


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Which version of Debian, and which init system are you using? With new systemd, use journalctl -b or follow this instruction. With old traditional sysvinit, you can use bootlogd to log all the output from init scripts. I can see that message in /etc/init.d/udev, which would be run by sysvinit boot. # wait for the udevd childs to finish ...


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The usual way to do this is to start in a clean/minimal chroot. Alternatively, when you have constructed a list of dependencies, check the correctness of the list in a clean/minimal chroot. There are tools like schroot, sbuild, pbuilder, cowbuilder etc. that can help in creating and managing such a chroot.


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To enable the swap device you can swapon /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 If there is an error with that swap space, because it was destroyed somehow, you can reformat the swap device with mkswap /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 Check the related manual pages swapon(1) and mkswap(1) for more information.


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Have you tried purging the package and then reinstalling it? apt-get purge terminator Then delete configuration files located in your home directory rm -rfvI /home/your_user_name/.config/terminator This should remove all the config files. Now reinstall. apt-get install terminator


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There's a console provided during installation on the second VT (and the third); you can access it by pressing AltF2 (or AltF3 for the third one). The installer is on the first VT (AltF1) and the detailed installer logs are on the fourth. You'll also find a "shell" option in the main installer menu; this will open a shell in the first VT, which you need to ...


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The file /usr/share/pulseaudio/alsa-mixer/paths/analog-output.conf.common contains all the explanations and the basic settings on how pulseaudio will tinker with Alsa Mixer settings.


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This works for me on a debian system, i'm guessing the file format has changed since 2011 . This system is pretty fresh so i wouldn't expect this to work on an older system, although that might just require unzipping the logs and using a glob to refer to all of them. grep 'install ' /var/log/dpkg.log.1 | cut -f4 -d' ' /var/log/dpkg.log has a date and ...



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