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5

The UltraVideo device If you look at the specs for that particular device it doesn't support Linux. Features Support Windows XP,Vista, Winodws 7,Windows 8, windows 8.1, Mac OS up to 10.9.4 (**Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server**) System Requirements Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server/Linux Other compatible devices? ...


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Having a single Thunderbolt port does not mean that you can connect only one Thunderbolt display. Thunderbolt can be daisy-chained. Multiple displays are possible via a single Thunderbolt port. I do not know whether Linux supports daisy-chained Thunderbolt displays. And of course I do not know whether Thunderbolt daisy-chaining is an option for you, as far ...


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Apt-get does not have a "safeupgrade" command. Are you thinking of "aptitude safe-upgrade"? That aside, apt-get only "knows" things because the package system maintains a database of all the changes the package subsystem programs makes. When you download source and build it yourself and then install it, that is not done using the package subsystem so none ...


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You have to go into the desktop manager and play with the settings, I believe you have to go into the settings manager, choose the desktop settings, change single image to image list, choose which wallpaper then repeat for the second monitor.


3

They work immediately after saving


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By the very definition of what the root user account is, this account can do EVERYTHING & ANYTHING. It can completely destroy the system's filesystem and manipulate anything on the system. If you're going to do any experimentation such as this, you'll want to do it in a virtual machine, not on your bare metal system. Since this is a learning exercise I ...


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It looks like hid_multitouch might be your driver. Before blacklisting, try the following: modprobe -r hid_multitouch If this works then add it to the blacklist


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That is because a starting X session never reads your ~/.bashrc and ~/.profile. Usually, the desktop manager is started as root or its own user from an init script. The resulting process usually has the environment of the init process when it hits the desktop manager starting script. (I will not talk about less established init implementations at this ...


1

Yes you can dual boot with the same OS, same distro, same distro version. The different partitions do not need to know about each other, although it is customary (at least when disc space was at a premium) to share swap space when dual booting. The only thing when using the same version of a particular distro (e.g. two times Wheezy), is that it becomes less ...


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Don't use sudo in init scripts. They're run as root to start with. If you were to use sudo in /etc/rc.local (which as per #1 there is no point in doing), you need to provide a $PATH or the path to the executable because there is no $PATH set when this is run at boot by init. So, e.g., if you wanted to run ls, first find out where it is: whereis ls ...


1

Why don't you make your debian computer to require only public and private keys instead of requiring for a password? You can change that setting on the sshd_config file. But before you do that you just have to generate the keys and install them on your server with ssh-copy-keys. After going through this process nobody would be able to even try to guess an ...


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The biggest issue with public connections is the password. I don't really care if someone comes to know my username/what I did. What matters though, is how they could re-use my password. I suggest securing SSH access with two-steps authentication. I found that link explaining how to enable Google Authenticator for your SSH login: ...


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Delete the file ~/.gnupg/random_seed. Then make a backup of the whole directory ~/.gnupg/. Copy it back after reinstalling the OS. Take care to securely erase the files on the backup storage if other people might get access to it (e.g. if it's a USB stick). Usually /home is put on a separate volume so that the user data is not affected by an OS change.


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I guess you want an automatic update notifier (not just apt-get). Try with the update-notifier package.


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You can update the package list and print the available updates by executing apt-get update apt-get --just-print upgrade You can update your system by executing the same command without --just-print: apt-get upgrade You'll need to be root or have sudo privileges to execute the above commands. As for getting notifications, take a look at ...


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APT doesn't know anything about your manually-installed software. If you installed Emacs under /usr/local (the default location), that installation is completely independent from the Emacs installation under /usr managed by APT. Running emacs will run /usr/local/bin/emacs (your manual installation); running /usr/bin/emacs will run the Emacs installed by APT ...


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I can't tell what your monitor names are, so adapt to this line of code. xrandr --output (mon1) --left-of (mon2)


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Upgrading the kernel did solved the issues with mouse pointers, which is available using the wheezy backports. Add the backports repo to your /etc/apt/sources.list and give the following commands: #login as root su #update packages apt-get update #install through backports apt-get -t wheezy-backports install linux-image-3.16-0.bpo.3-amd64 ...


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You can prevent all users and even root user to login to system if you delete /etc/passwd file. Deadly commands that can ruin your system


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The command 'chmod +x filename' does not install anything, it just sets the "executable" attribute on file. If you write a shell script with the filename 'myscript' and then you do 'chmod +x myscript' then instead of doing 'sh myscript' to run it, you will be able to do so with only 'myscript' (assuming the file is in a directory in your path). That being ...


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It's a common Debian problem, you could try the following: Edit /etc/apt/sources.list Comment out all sources from /etc/apt/sources.list Add the following to /etc/apt/sources.list : "deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main" save, exit your editor from the command line "apt-get update" launch synaptic package manager search ...


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There is an application called BleachBit it has following features: Clear the memory and swap on Linux Delete broken shortcuts on Linux Delete the Firefox URL history without deleting the whole file—with optional shredding Delete Linux localizations: delete languages you don't use. More powerful than localepurge and available on more Linux distributions. ...


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I have success using the curl options below: curl -vlkL https://www.basebit.com.br --ciphers DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA What HTTP response do you get?


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For those who don't want to install aptitude: sudo dpkg -P $(dpkg -l | awk '/^rc/ { print($2) }')



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