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14

No, you will get a "delivered" notice or an "error" notice. Once the mail is accepted by the remote end, you don't get to know where it goes after that. At least not on the MTA side of things. One of the errors may be "rejected cause of spam" or "rejected because of SPF" or the like, but if your email is accepted, even to the spam folder, you will not get ...


10

No, what happens at the destination is visible only there (unless it bounces your email back to you).


6

This is still quite a broad question. Verifying packages The contents of the mirrors are signed using PGP keys, directly or indirectly. Starting at the "root" of a Debian distribution: Release, signed with a detached signature in Release.gpg, contains the hashes (MD5, SHA1, SHA256) of all the package indices and installer hashes; the package indices ...


5

No, what happens after your email leaves your system cannot be traced unless you have access to the receiving computer, or if there is some spam filter program that gives feedback. Such feedback programs would sent an email back asking for confirmation, so that automatic spam could be distinguished from real message sent by humans, but once bots were smart ...


5

Looks like you missed something. From the Debian documentation: 6.3.2. Setting Up Users And Passwords Just before configuring the clock, the installer will allow you to set up the “root” account and/or an account for the first user. Other user accounts can be created after the installation has been completed. 6.3.2.1. Set the Root Password ...


4

As you figured out, ln only replaced symlinks. Fixing this will involve at least reinstalling the packages which provide the missing symlinks... Using find's -L option combined with the -type l test allows broken symlinks to be identified; then dpkg -S will identify the corresponding package in most cases: dpkg -S $(find -L /usr/bin -type l) Filtering ...


3

There is no functionality that will tell you which folder your mail was delivered to. Even the tricks that tell you if the message was read, don't tell you where it was read from. However, you can get a good idea from the major providers, gmail, yahoo, and microsoft, if you configure DMARC. This builds on your DKIM and SPF configuration, and can report ...


3

On a debian system, postgresql files and directories should be owned by user postgres, in group postgres, with permissions of either 0700 (directories) or 0600 (files). If they're not that, you can repair perms & ownership with: sudo chown -R postgres:postgres /var/lib/postgresql/9.4/ sudo chmod -R u=rwX,go= /var/lib/postgresql/9.4/ Note the capital ...


3

You need to ensure you don't have another, more general pin priority which takes priority over your non-free-excluding rule. For example, if your /etc/apt/preferences file (or another file in /etc/apt/preferences.d) contains something like the following: Package: * Pin: release a=unstable Pin-Priority: 200 then unstable packages will have pin priority ...


2

You should edit the file /etc/pam.d/gdm-password commenting the line that contains the root user check, #auth required pam_succeed_if.so user != root quiet_success


2

The latest version of the NVIDIA drivers doesn't support your graphics chipset. You should install the appropriate version as provided via the non-free repositories hosted by Debian. The full instructions are on the Debian wiki, but basically for your 740M, you need version 340.96, available for Jessie (which I'm assuming is the version you're using, Debian ...


2

There's a bug here for that issue. Options are to: Log out and back in again. Press Alt+F2 then press r then Enter to restart Cinnamon.


2

Pluma is a Gedit fork without client-side decorations, which means it includes the usual the window borders and title bar. # apt-get install pluma Below is a screenshot with the window manager Blackbox.


2

There's a reason why there are two commands: upgrade only upgrades packages but never deletes any or installs any extra, whereas dist-upgrade can also add and remove packages if necessary to upgrade everything that can be upgraded. For example, if the newer version of mariadb-server depends on a newer library version, apt upgrade won't install the new ...


2

You have pam_google_authenticator.so enabled in /etc/pam.d/common-auth. common-auth is included in (almost) every other file in /etc/pam.d/ - that's its purpose, to provide common authentication rules for programs that use pam. If you don't want every program to use google 2-factor auth, delete it from /etc/pam.d/common-auth.


1

This appears to be related to bug #665487. To remove dovecot-managesieved, try renaming /etc/init.d/dovecot temporarily: sudo mv /etc/init.d/dovecot{,.disabled} sudo apt-get purge dovecot-managesieved sudo mv /etc/init.d/dovecot{.disabled,} This should avoid the attempt to restart dovecot during the package's removal.


1

I've managed to solve the problem. In this link you can read the following: IPv4: Hash-based multipath routing. When the routing cache was removed in 3.6, the IPv4 multipath algorithm changed from more or less being destination-based into being quasi-random per-packet scheduling. This increased the risk of out-of-order packets and made it ...


1

d is an abbreviation for default. The default and actual permissions are independent. Run the setfacl command a second time without the d:, then the permissions should work as desired. I assume you want the effect of both commands. The output of getfacl can suggest this conclusion to you, by showing default: expanded showing the original Access Control ...



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