Hot answers tagged

14

As Julie said, you can use df to display free space, passing it either the mount point or the device name: df --human-readable /home df --human-readable /dev/sda1 You'll get something like this: Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 833G 84G 749G 10% /home To run it continuously, use watch. Default update interval is 2 seconds, but ...


4

The document you linked to is the FAQ, which, while relevant, isn't necessarily regarded as authoritative (the distinctions are probably subtle though and any inconsistency is really a bug). The authoritative document is the Debian Policy Manual, which has a whole chapter dedicated to maintainer scripts. Because that's not all that easy to read, there are ...


3

The installer considers that the USB stick you used for installation is a CD or DVD image; it left a reference to it in /etc/apt/sources.list as a source of packages for later. If you only wish to install packages from the Internet, you can remove the line mentioning cdrom: in /etc/apt/sources.list, then update the package cache with sudo apt-get update ...


3

If you don't like the idea of dedicating a whole terminal to watching the output of df, you could consider a tool such as conky. There are countless examples of using conky to monitor everything from HDD usage, HDD temp, ram usage, local weather, news headlines... you name it.


3

To get the smallest possible system, follow the instructions you linked to, but specify --variant=minbase on the debootstrap command line. This will install only apt, essential packages and their dependencies. You will always end up with packages not flagged as "Essential": some of the dependencies of essential packages aren't themselves "Essential" (they ...


3

A bit dirty and there is probably a cleaner solution (maybe using SELinux or grsec) but you can hide a process by mounting an empty directory inside of /proc/<pid>. For example something like this : mount -o bind /empty/dir /proc/42 will prevent regular users from seeing process 42. They will however see that something is hidden as they will be ...


3

Solution to the problem is to modify the entries in cron with the absolute path names. Added cron command logging capability as the machine doesn't have an MTA to send failure notifications, as follows: 0 0 * * * /usr/local/bin/bitcoind -datadir=/home/pi/bitcoinData -daemon >> ~/bitcoinData/bitcoin-cron.log 2>&1 0 6 * * * ...


2

In KDE the reference CD burning software is K3b, which is packaged in Debian as k3b. On the command-line you'd probably use cdrkit (the main package is called wodim).


2

I was able to solve this problem by following commands : mv /var/lib/dpkg/info/coturn.* /tmp/ dpkg --remove --force-remove-reinstreq coturn This worked. And I installed coturn again, then it worked.


2

You probably need to install firmware-iwlwifi from the non-free repositories; this is the package which contains iwlwifi-6000-4.ucode. The Debian wiki provides detailed instructions. In summary: edit /etc/apt/sources.list to add the non-free repository if necessary (you will end up with a line like deb http://httpredir.debian.org/debian/ jessie main ...


2

You do not have a vga in your BeagleBone. In my Lamobo R1 (ARM like the BB) I am passing to the kernel the parameters sunxi_ve_mem_reserve=0 sunxi_g2d_mem_reserve=0 sunxi_fb_mem_reserve=0 console=ttyS1,115200n8 and took out the ones: console=tty1 disp.screen0_output_mode=1920x1080p60 Why this parameters: sunxi_ve_mem_reserve=0 This eliminates ...


2

PLEASE NOTE If you already have the Debian 8 version of VirtualBox installed this may not work. If you need VirtualBox installed and working for other virtual images this may break that. You can manually install the wheezy versions of the required packages. Download the following .debs for your architecture: libgsoap2 virtualbox virtualbox-fuse Use ...


2

df is a simple command line utility that shows you disk usage, including free space. Check man df for details.


2

The file ~/.config/geany/filedefs only exists if you have created it, either manually or by using the menu Tools / Configuration Files / filetypes.common to save your configuration. Debian's package for geany-common has the default settings for this file in /usr/share/geany/filetypes.common


2

The entries are added to the log each time a cron job runs. To reduce the time between entries, you would have to look at your cron jobs and change their timings. This, though, may break something that relies on those jobs running at specific intervals. If they really do annoy you, then simply follow the instructions on the Debian bug report and stop cron ...


1

I used the command sudo ufw allow 3389/tcp and then restarted using sudo /etc/init.d/xrdp restart to solve this same issue on a pi. However my /etc/ufw/before.rules file looked like this: # START OPENVPN RULES # NAT table rules *nat :POSTROUTING ACCEPT [0:0] # Allow traffic from OpenVPN client to eth0 -A POSTROUTING -s 10.8.0.0/8 -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE ...


1

Just for the record Elementary OS != Debian, it might be similar in some ways, but it's unlikely that they only changed the name. Look at your grub configuration, typically found in /etc/grub or /etc/grub.d, it's probably just a matter of changing the order of things in it. On my machine (that runs Debian exclusively, so I can't test, but if elemtary OS ...


1

Download the intel driver e1000e from here Change to the driver src directory: cp e1000e-3.3.3.tar /usr/local/src/ unzip the archive tar zxf e1000e-3.3.3.tar Install make install unload and load driver: rmmod e1000e modprobe e1000e update initramfs update-initramfs -u Reboot Connect to the internet Edit your sources.list nano ...


1

You need to modify your /etc/apt/sources.list and comment out the line beginning with deb cdrom:. Use the editor of your choice to add a # directly before deb cdrom: save the file and then run sudo apt-get update.


1

If you want to execute something from your current location, you need to write ./ before the command. In your case ./chrome Calling chrome directly would only work if the current directory is in the PATH environment variable.


1

For basic burning, Debian has at least the following tools, wodim -v dev=/dev/sr0 -dao /home/user/file.iso cdrskin -v dev=/dev/sr0 -dao /home/user/file.iso xorriso -as cdrecord -v dev=/dev/sr0 -dao /home/user/file.iso I don't know if they support all the features you require. You can get more details from the Debian site.


1

As you can see, what you're trying to do is not possible as you're moving files that are still open by another process, so they will continue to get updated properly, avoiding space that is already used by them. The free space reported is actually right, even if you don't see the files in the directory listing anymore. As long as the file is open by a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible