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4

linux-image-amd64 is a generic metapackage, which depends on the specific default kernel package. In your particular case, linux-image-amd64 probably depends on linux-image-3.16-2-amd64. In general is suffices to install the generic metapackage. You could alternatively install the specific linux-image-3.16-2-amd64 package, but in general it is better style ...


3

No, is not. There two places where you can add repositories. The /etc/apt/sources.list and any file ending in .list in the /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ directory (if you add an entry in the apt.conf file you can add more, but the ones before are the default). So, just check the files in the directory and remove the one you don't need. On the other hand, ...


3

Don't do this, the directory is owned by libselinux1 and some packages depend on it. You should not remove files or directories provided by the package manager. Proven on my Debian system (7.6) To find out, which package owns a path on your system, use $ dpkg -S /selinux/ libselinux1:amd64: /selinux $ sudo apt-get remove libselinux1 ..... The following ...


3

Each package that compiles with the Debian policy contains a changelog file in /usr/share/doc/PACKAGE-NAME/changelog.Debian. The file may be called changelog.gz if the package is built from a native Debian source. The latest entry in the changelog is supposed to be the time the package was finalized, i.e. it's after the last change to the package source and ...


2

If you rule out adding the key and using that, you can still verify the MD5 manually. Print the md5sum of the Packages file which is listed in the Release file. sed -n "s,main/binary-i386/Packages$,,p" ftp.us.debian.org_debian_dists_sid_Release # Print the md5sum of the Packages file itself. md5sum ...


2

If you install and enable the "sysstat" package and enable SNMP for sadc. You can then get TCP retransmit information using the below command. And you will also have a configurable amount of historical data (below output is from Ubuntu 13.10). # sar -n ETCP Linux 3.11.0-12-generic (hamilton) 2014-10-14 _x86_64_ (2 CPU) 16:05:01 atmptf/s estres/s ...


2

If you need to regularly check those numbers (or even log them somewhere), maybe netstat can help as explained here: http://serverfault.com/questions/318909/how-passively-monitor-for-tcp-packet-loss-linux You could log the output and analyze it later. If you need something to watch in realtime, perhaps tcptrace fits the bill. An alternative could be to ...


2

Check build date of installed software, eg aptitude. This won't work if the software had a security upgrade, but otherwise the earlist compilation time from of a bunch of packages that do report their compile times would give you some idea. My system is Debian 7.6 (wheezy). Here are some examples from my machine. aptitude faheem@orwell:~$ aptitude ...


2

I think you can do this: Package: yourpackage Pin: version 7.* Pin-Priority: 999 This would allow upgrades to yourpackage to versions matching 7.*


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This command worked in the end, executed on my beaglebone as root: pkill -USR1 -n -x dd I could run the command over and over again and it would indeed update (slow transfer). Interestingly, the update would appear on the other Terminal window (i.e. the one executing the dd command): Debian GNU/Linux 7 BeagleBoard.org BeagleBone Debian Image 2014-04-23 ...


1

I do not have access to dnsmasq but according to this thread titled: dnsmasq is it caching? you can send the signal USR1 to the dnsmasq process, causing it to dump statistics to the system log. $ sudo pkill -USR1 dnsmasq Then consult the system logs: $ sudo tail /var/log/syslog Jan 21 13:37:57 dnsmasq[29469]: time 1232566677 Jan 21 13:37:57 ...


1

In your /etc/exports you need to replace the 192.168.1.* with 192.168.1.0/24, you can only use wildcards in hostnames. You also need to create the mountpoints on the client system, you only show the current mountpoint /mnt/green; /mnt/nuci5 and /mnt/nuci5-extra must also exist. Maybe they do, but you filtered those out in that case. Beyond that it should ...


1

First, the "insserv: warning" ... is just that, warnings. The command has still succeeded and would have disabled kdm from starting automatically. However, in order to disable the display manager, you could instead edit /etc/X11/default-display-manager and make sure the file exists but is empty. Reboot and you should get to the console. If you need to ...


1

$ cat /etc/hosts 127.0.0.1 localhost 127.0.1.1 JAZZ In this example, the machine has 2 names: "localhost" and "JAZZ". Not every machine has a hostname: android@user$cat /etc/hosts 127.0.0.1 localhost This is perfectly OK.


1

Uninstall zfs-fuse and install ZFS on Linux: http://zfsonlinux.org, and for Debian specifically: http://zfsonlinux.org/debian.html The instructions from the links above are pretty straight forward, however, a couple of caveats I ran into that aren't mentioned: /etc/hostid file wasn't there which resulted in a failed initramfs image build, the fix is easy: ...


1

Following the idea using awk, I ended up using: dpkg --get-selections \ # get the list | grep -v deinstall \ # throw away deselected packages | grep ':i386' \ # get the i386 arch packages | sed 's/install//g' \ # drop 'install' to get list | sed 's/:i386/:amd64/g' \ # replace i386 ...



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