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5

Most of the time, a source line will be in the file /etc/apt/sources.list, so you should edit that. However, if you don't find it there, look at files inside the directory /etc/apt/sources.list.d. As far as I know, a source line must be on of those two places. Reference: man sources.list. Putting the comment character # in front of any source line should be ...


4

But init.d screws me over by changing into a screen resolution that my monitor/graphics card does not support. I have the feeling it is some VESA mode that is being changed. I don't think that's an init process. That's the kernel. It occurs during the boot messages, right? If you compile the kernel without framebuffer support, it should not happen. ...


4

/etc/environment is a file used by PAM, meaning it is processed by a log in, which sudo bash does not do, and (from man sudoers): Command environment Since environment variables can influence program behavior, sudoers provides a means to restrict which variables from the user's environment are inherited by the command to be run. There are ...


4

This type of issue can be tricky to debug. For starters it's helpful to isolate it to either a network or HDD access issue. This is done by eliminating potential causes until you're left with the culprit. Background Before we get started we'll be making use of several applications that you may need to install. I'm not going to detail how to do this, I'm ...


4

You can either add the script to your rc.local file located in /etc/, or create an init script. One of the easiest ways to create an init script is to use 'pleaserun' . You'll want to use sysv as your platform target. https://github.com/jordansissel/pleaserun


3

There should be a line with launchpad somewhere. This should show where: grep -Ri launchpad /etc/apt/sources.list* Could be also that you have configured a personalized path for sources.lists: grep -R Dir /etc/apt/apt.conf* Find it and remove it.


2

Since @Bob says there's no runtime configuration option for this and I didn't want to rebuild gdm3 from patched source, I took the following approach. First, move the real X server aside: sudo dpkg-divert --local --rename --add /usr/bin/Xorg Then drop a new shell script in place of /usr/bin/Xorg: #!/bin/sh test -x /usr/local/bin/Xorg && exec ...


2

Since this is the fglrx driver, you can use the aticonfig command to generate an xorg.conf file. From your xrandr output I'm guessing the command you need is this: sudo aticonfig --initial=dual-head --screen-layout=left If this doesn't give you what you want, aticonfig will automatically back up your xorg.conf file (with a .fglrx-x extension), so you can ...


2

I found this answer on AU in a Q&A titled: How can I set up dual monitor display with ATI driver?. excerpt Open a terminal and type: $ gksudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf In the sub-section "display" add this code or modify if already exist: virtual 2880 1024 Where 2880 and 1024 are the value returned by the error: required virtual size ...


2

Don't reinvent the wheel. apt-get install apticron Apticron is a simple script which sends daily emails about pending package updates such as security updates, properly handling packages on hold both by dselect and aptitude.


2

The issue seems to be that you can't have both the amd64 and i386 versions of libssl1.0.0 installed together unless they are exactly the same version. Above the amd64 version is 1.0.1e-2+deb7u6 while the i386 version is 1.0.1e-2+deb7u7. For some reason the i386 architecture has a newer version of the package than the others, it is unclear why this is. ...


1

This was an interesting one. The poster was trying to fix a machine that was accessible remotely over ssh. This machine had been partially upgraded to unstable, including libc6. However, parts were still on stable, and apt was at the squeeze version. The poster wanted the machine completely on stable. I walked the poster through fixing his machine. The chat ...


1

You screwed up. You were told you couldn't format the disk because it was in use. It was in use. You were trying to format one of the existing disks, not the new one. Now you formatted the existing drive and lost your data. You will need to restore from backup. You can see from the pvdisplay output that /dev/sdd1 is 100% free, so that seems to be the ...


1

Uncommenting load-module module-alsa-sink load-module module-alsa-source device=hw:1,0 in /etc/pulse/default.pa did the trick. Edit: However, after uncommenting the lines mentioned above, I ran into all sorts of problems, for example vlc started crashing. I now removed the complete folder /etc/pulse/ and now everything seems to work fine, including sound ...


1

The option he provides for running a script when you boot to the console will work on a headless installation without requiring a user to log in. It should work with the setup you described. The other option in a regular Debian install is to edit the /etc/rc.local file, which is run on boot. Creating an init.d script is a cleaner solution, though.


1

#!/usr/bin/sh The normal location of sh, in almost every unix out there, is /bin/sh. Some unix variants have merged /bin and /usr/bin, so /usr/bin/sh also works, but the portable way is /bin/sh, so that's what you should use in shebangs. Most importantly for you, on Debian, unless you've gone out of your way, there is no /usr/bin/sh.


1

Rather then attempt to roll my own I'd make use of this version I found via google. gistfile1.sh excerpt #! /bin/sh ### BEGIN INIT INFO # Provides: god # Required-Start: $remote_fs $syslog # Required-Stop: $remote_fs $syslog # Default-Start: 2 3 4 5 # Default-Stop: 0 1 6 # Short-Description: God initscript ### END INIT INFO # ...


1

The adm group on Debian has a statically-allocated GID, which is 4. There are no system users in that group (and there shouldn't be any human users either). So you don't need to do anything beyond adding the adm group back: addgroup --gid 4 adm You can also restore the group automatically (as well as undo any other changes that you made to the Debian ...



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