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3

You can do it with find like so (to stay close to your original command) sudo find /mnt/sdb/ -type f -exec shred -v -n 1 {} + You should run it without -exec first so you can verify the list of files. However, if you've already removed files using regular rm, or overwritten files by editing or copying them, those files may still exist in the "free" space ...


1

fdisk -l or sfdisk -l will do the trick and blkid yourdevice can give you informations about the type, the uid and the filesystem on your device


0

I solved a very similar problem with: rm /dev/sdb with my usb drive plugged-in (and listed as /dev/sdb). After that, I can create a new partition table for the whole drive.


3

There are several reasons why this may have failed: /var/www/html could actually be a symlink to somewhere else in your filesystem (try ls -la /var/www/ to see if there is a line like html -> /foo/bar/html. If /dev/sda3 was mounted during either of your dd processes, the filesystem may have been corrupted so that you don't see that file any more. Using ...


2

The size of the image is the same as the size of the partition that you are creating the image from. You haven't said how big your partition is, but if it's, say, half of the hard drive's total capacity then your stated size is not unreasonable depending on the size of the hard drive. The important thing is that the partition where you are saving the image ...


8

By doing the copy 512 bytes at a time you are doing lots and lots of reads and writes. About a trillion, actually, if you do the math. You've also asked for sync [EDIT: this is not oflag=sync so the next statement is invalid], which means to wait for each write to actually make it out to disk before that write can return. Let's say your disk is pretty speedy ...


2

Checkout ntfsclone. I believe that's what you're looking for. From the man page: ntfsclone will efficiently clone (copy, save, backup, restore) or rescue an NTFS filesystem to a sparse file, image, device (partition) or standard output. It works at disk sector level and copies only the used data. Unused disk space becomes zero (cloning to sparse ...



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