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1

About your actual question, see taliezin's answer (and accept that one ;) About your other problem: Search for the string 8sh9JBUR0VYeQ on the disk to figure out the disk block(s) it resides in. Then dd that disk block(s) into a file, replace that string with a known password hash (the old crypt() one - same length) and write the disk block(s) back to the ...


10

The accounts with passwords are the accounts with a glob of base64 gibberish in the second field: root:8sh9JBUR0VYeQ:0:0:Super-User,,,,,,,:/:/bin/ksh lp:VvHUV8idZH1uM:9:9:Print Spooler Owner:/var/spool/lp:/bin/sh This computer appears to be using the traditional, DES-based crypt(3) password hash. This hash is quite weak by modern standards; if you can't ...


18

You have to check man passwd: If the encrypted password is set to an asterisk (*), the user will be unable to login using login(1), but may still login using rlogin(1), run existing processes and initiate new ones through rsh(1), cron(8), at(1), or mail filters, etc. Trying to lock an account by simply changing the ...


7

This means that it is disabled for direct login. It is a user that is used for running services or to be used for rlogin. Check https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passwd#Password_file


1

Testdisk helped me more than once. It will search for filesystem and/or files. Give it a try: http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk


1

I know this is an old post but I had a similar but different issue. My issue was that I had a HDD with data and accidentally used "pvcreate" on it and realized that I could no longer access data on the disk (ooops). I tried a bunch of things and after a couple nights of research I stopped thinking about undoing my mistake and started thinking about ...


1

Had the same problem: Disk that is about to die, with NTFS partition that I wanted to rescue first and fix after (before the disk is totally gone). Was able to resolve it with ntfsclone: Connect the two disks - old and new Boot with Live-Linux from USB (can use Parted Magic for that as well) Create a big-enough partition on the new disk (use gparted for ...


2

Using the df utility you should be able to see on what filesystem a directory is seated, for example: df -h /etc Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/crypt--lvm-root 225G 165G 50G 77% / Note the input as /etc and the listed output / in column "Mounted on"


3

Recuva : Recuva is not available in Lubuntu. Diskdigger : Can be installed in Lubuntu. Here is the oficial documentation for installation. testdisk : Available in the universe repository. You need to enable it first (if not done already). Run the following command to enable it (assuming you are using Lubuntu 14.04 and using official repo) : echo 'deb ...


5

The latest version of the HFS+ utilities on Debian are, as far as I can tell, from 2006 and lacking a maintainer. Apple released Time Machine in 2007, and when they did they introduced some quite significant changes to HFS+ (particularly to do with hard links to directories). It is highly likely that the HFS+ tools on Debian cannot deal very well with a Time ...



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