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2

This is going to be tricky to fix by hand. I hope you haven't modified any more data on this disk, apart from the broken partition table you wrote to it. Using sfdisk, fdisk, etc to create a backup of the partition table is a good idea (when you don't accidentally type the wrong command :) ). But for extra insurance I like to back up the boot sectors of my ...


3

Unfortunately you cannot do what you seek. While the directory may be held open, the files that reside within the directory are not part of the directory itself. The directory simply stores the file names. In addition to this, with the files having been deleted, the directory has already been modified to remove those files. In short, unless each individual ...


0

file system confusion after suspend (Ubuntu 13.10) I have isolated recurring file system problems to correlate with suspending my laptop while the LUKS-encrypted USB disk is mounted. Commonly, it thinks that whatever directory I had open in a terminal is now empty after resuming from suspend. It seems likely that saving a file to such a directory could ...


0

I don't know if you are still trying to extract data off that hard drive or if you were successful already, but in case if you were not successful and would like to give it a try to see if you can recover, perhaps, lost Bitcoins or whatever, I have made a few modifications to your ddrescue command line parameters, I have added the following: $ sudo ddrescue ...


-3

connect drive through external interface mount umount /dev/{sd*} extundelete --restore-all /dev/{sd*} results go to home folder on boot drive bonus points: write a GUI for this See this link for more info: undelete a just deleted file on ext4 with extundelete.


2

Most Linux recovery tools were command line based. If the user is specifically looking for some GUI based Linux tools for recover important files, consider reading the entire posts URLed below: http://www.stellarinfo.com/support/kb/index.php/article/recover-deleted-files-from-linux Thanks!!


0

I found the answer here, and followed the advice, as in the following code block. The first line is the recommended command, and the rest is the result from ntfsfix. Now the disk mounts with no problem, with the data apparently intact. [root@localhost]/home/Harry# ntfsfix /dev/sdb1 Mounting volume... $MFTMirr does not match $MFT (record 0). FAILED ...


0

I used photorec which comes in the package testdisk. It worked fine for me to recover photos from a sandisk microsd that was corrupted by my phone.


0

It is recommended to perform a fsck unmount this partition /dev/sdb2 if you have nothing important riding on that device, if that does not work try doing a fsck with a live CD. $ sudo fsck /dev/sdb2


1

You can instruct the filesystem to perform an immediate fsck upon being mounted like so: Method #1: Using /forcefsck You can usually schedule a check at the next reboot like so: $ sudo touch /forcefsck $ sudo reboot Method #2: Using shutdown You can also tell the shutdown command to do so as well, via the -F switch: $ sudo shutdown -rF now NOTE: The ...


0

Believe you are requiring to run a fsck kind of operation. You can try running fsck as follows: $ sudo fsck /dev/sdb2


1

This might save the trouble for some of you. If you ever used gedit to edit that file, by default a copy of that file will be created. For example let's suppose we have accidentaly deleted 'myfile.txt'. In the folder that used to contain the file you have just deleted use these commands and you'll recover the copy from there: ls | grep 'myfile.txt~' With a ...


1

From: https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/filesystems/ext4.txt commit=nrsec (*) Ext4 can be told to sync all its data and metadata every 'nrsec' seconds. The default value is 5 seconds. This means that if you lose your power, you will lose as much as the latest 5 seconds of work (your ...


21

It sounds like you've got a decent grasp on what happened. Yes, because you hard-powered-off the system before your changes were committed to disk, they were there when you booted back up. The system caches all writes before flushing them out to disk. There are several options which control this behavior, all located at /proc/sys/vm/dirty_* [kernel doc]. ...



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