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I feel this question should have a working example so this is how I used ddrescue 0) Installed an identical size (and brand) replacement drive under warranty and moved the old drive to a second slot 1) I used an ubuntu boot cd I tried the simple option but it immediately produced a lot of errors and hung dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sda bs=512 ...


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In RAID recovery, you should never, never, ever --create unless you really really REALLY know EXACTLY what you're doing. However your output looks like you've already done the --create. The RAID on your /dev/sde is a RAID5, created Sun Apr 29 22:14:28 2012, consisting of 8 disks as you stated in your question. This RAID was last updated on Fri Dec 27 ...


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you say "After finding the raid in a degraded state, I tried a number of times to bring it back." what did you do exactly? if you find a degraded array you need to replace the failed disk. if you did not do that and you got another drive failure, your RAID is gone! RAID5 tolerates only one failed drive. you say you have eight 2TB drives in your RAID5. your ...


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If the filesystem you want is on an LVM, you should not mount the partition directly. Instead, look for the logical volume name under /dev/mapper and mount that. If nothing is there, you may need to perform an LVM scan and activate the partition. E.G. # lvm lvm> pvscan lvm> lvdisplay [list of LVMs found] lvm> lvchange -a y [lv name] The pvscan ...


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Lack of partitions is a common cause for needing recovery in the first place. A partition table is the most common / standard way to declare that the disk is in use (and thanks to various partition types, it usually also declares what exactly each partition is used for). An unpartitioned disk looks like an unused disk to many programs; installers select ...


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This was true once - once upon a time drives were smaller (and slower), as were tapes. If you have a large raid group, and suffer a (compound) fault - all data on that raid group must be recovered. As sizes increase, so too do the numbers of tapes required. So a large filesystem, where you're doing a full restore might mean recovering everything and ...


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To illustrate the question in a simple and efficient manner, consider two scenarios: You install your favourite linux distribution on entire disk i.e. without any partitions: Suppose your system is crashed because operating system is unable to access some sectors and unable to boot. You lost some chunk of data due to bad sectors and because of that you ...



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