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6

No, there isn't. At best, if you're reasonably neat, you'll be able to keep /home intact, but despite the fact that they're both Debian derivatives they're entirely different distributions. Your "upgrade" is the rough equivalent of asking whether it's possible to turn a fedora core install into a SuSE one.


5

Are you sure what you want is happening? When you run ls /directory | grep '[^term]' you are essentially grepping for not the letters t e r m. This means if a file has other letters in its name it will still appear in the output of ls. Take the following directory for instance: $ ls alpha brave bravo charlie delta Now if I run ls |grep '^[brav]' I get ...


5

Take a look at this tutorial titled: Learn Linux, 101: Runlevels, shutdown, and reboot. You can change from runlevel 3 (non-GUI Desktop) to GUI Desktop (typically runlevel 5) with the following command: $ telinit 5 You can see what runlevel you're currently in with the runlevel command: $ runlevel N 3 After running the above telinit command you should ...


5

The apt history is usually kept in /var/log/apt. You should be able to view the most recent log with: less /var/log/apt/history.log Older log files may be compressed, so you may need: zless /var/log/apt/history.log.1.gz Also see the term.log files for the output that was on the terminal.


4

I found that this is possible by editing the slim.conf file available in /etc. You would need admin credentials to open this file. SLiM themes are placed in /usr/share/slim/themes: In the slim.conf file, there is a section that mentions the theme: # current theme, use comma separated list to specify a set to # randomly choose from current_theme ...


4

If you just want to disable it: update-rc.d -f gdm remove If you want to remove it: apt-get remove gdm You only have to address the gdm package to keep X from starting. And yes, it is perfectly safe. Also, depending on what version of Debian your CrunchBang server is based off of, you may be dealing with gdm3. If so, just replace gdm with gdm3 in ...


4

Problem 1 apt-get is for downloading and installing packages from the Debian repositories. It is not for installing local .deb files. For that, you should use gdebi instead: sudo gdebi skype-debian_4.2.0.11-1_i386 or, for a graphical interface sudo gdebi-gtk skype-debian_4.2.0.11-1_i386 I haven't used CrunchBang but almost certainly, simply double ...


3

If its debian based you should be able to use apt-get remove to remove the packages associated with X. Alternatively dpkg --remove should also work. Here are the packages associated with X on my Ubuntu machine: gdm xserver-common xserver-xorg xserver-xorg-core xorg x11-common x11-xserver-utils Since both apt and dpkg handle dependencies, I'd think ...


3

You really need to qualify what you mean by "set the domain name" - there are at least three completely different interpretations of "domain" that might apply. You want to set the Windows Domain the system will use for SMB networking. I don't know offhand how to do this, but it would probably involve editing your Samba configuration; ...


3

It looks like a badly configured X server. Try the following: Boot normally. When you are at the login screen hit Ctrl+Alt+F2 (or any other F1-6 key) to drop to a CLI login screen. Login as root and stop the Display Manager. If you are using gdm: service gdm stop Generate a default xorg.conf file and copy it to /etc/X11: Xorg -configure cp xorg.conf.new ...


3

As warl0ck noted, LXDE uses openbox as the WM, so you may just have a problem in your configuration settings. Hopefully these LXDE file locations should get you back on course: The config files of LXPanel are stored in ~/.config/lxpanel/. Under LXDE, we use a different profile name - LXDE. So it's in ~/.config/lxpanel/LXDE. In this way, if you changed the ...


3

Get UNetbootin from your package manager/software-center if you're already running Linux: Open a terminal and type sudo apt-get install unetbootin for Debian and other Debian-based systems such as Ubuntu. - drop "sudo" if you are running as root. Type unetbootin in the terminal to launch. You can then use the second option to find and load onto the usb ...


3

All my USB hubs worked without a hitch, always. Yes, I've had broken(ish) USB ports that don't work right. Make sure the devices don't draw too much power, the power a USB device is allowed to draw is limited (that's why many hubs have two connectors, as do USB disk drives), if you try to draw more from the hub than what it is able to get from the PC, ...


3

Hubs are plug-and-play in the literal sense. If your device isn't working when it's plugged onto a USB hub, you have a hardware problem. Maybe the total cable length is too long, or maybe the device isn't getting enough power, or maybe your hub is defective.


3

The syndaemon should do the job. It can be found in the package xserver-xorg-input-synaptic. From the man page syndaemon - a program that monitors keyboard activity and disables the touchpad when the keyboard is being used. Disabling the touchpad while typing avoids unwanted movements of the pointer that could lead to giving focus to the ...


3

there is no reason the install/re-install /home. actually one of the reasons for having /home on a separate partition is to make it independent of the actual system. at work, i still use NFS-mounted /home partitions for many systems.


3

Use Ctrl-Alt-F2 - F5 to bring up a tty login. After logging in you can open you menu.xml file with a text editor and fix the problem. Once finished run the update-menus command and then reboot the computer or kill the Openbox session. Instead of restarting or killing the session, you might get lucky with the openbox --reconfigure command. Then just ...


3

Try installing lm-sensors and fancontrol, they can take care of setting the right RPM for your fans. Alter installation run sensors-detect (as root). It should give you a name of a kernel module at the end of the putput: To load everything that is needed, add this to /etc/modules: #----cut here---- # Chip drivers it87 #----cut here---- You have to add ...


2

The SLiM website has a page detailing how to create your own theme. You can find additional themes on a number of sites, including Gnome Look and in the Arch User Repository...


2

Yeah... CrunchBang Linux uses .debs, not .rpms. Try the linux-headers-2.6-686 package or some variant thereof (e.g. linux-headers-2.6-amd64 on a 64-bit installation). And you don't actually need the source code, you just need the externally-visible headers. And beware 10-year-old instructions.


2

Crunchbang did exactly what hibernate is meant to do. Hibernate writes the contents of your RAM to the disk and shuts the machine down. When you power your machine up again it detects that there is a RAM image file stored on disk and loads the contents of the RAM image back into RAM. You need to enter your password because it is configured that way in ...


2

Burning the ISO to a DVD and installing with that instead solved this (I used ImgBurn).


2

If (a very important if, so make sure you understand the difference first) you are using an MBR style hard disk, as opposed to the newer GPT style, you can simply back up your MBR (master boot record) before you install windows, then replace it afterward. To back-up: dd if=/dev/sda of=mbr.copy bs=512 count=1 "/dev/sda/" should be your actual hard disk ...


2

There's a bug report on this issue in Debian's bug tracking system, mentioning that Debian's unstable repositories already have fixed packages (and the package databases shows that they already hit the Debian/testing repos). Since Crunchbang 10 "Statler" is based on Debian/stable, these fixed packages could take some time to be available there; you can ...


2

I guess that grep -v flag does what you want. From the man page: -v, --invert-match Invert the sense of matching, to select non-matching lines. You can use ls /directory | grep -v [term] to print any non matching lines.


2

I run Crunchbang 10 on a 10 inch netbook with an AMD C60 CPU. Crunchbang is quite lightweight: On a Netbook, the limitations will be mostly on the hardware side. Example: Working on the command line or in a simple text editor, the CPU runs at about 5%. Recording a live audio stream via Internet or using a browser like Firefox will brings the CPU up to ...


2

In your ~/.config/openbox/autostart there are the following lines. ## Group start: ## 1. nitrogen - restores wallpaper ## 2. compositor - start ## 3. sleep - give compositor time to start ## 4. tint2 panel (\ nitrogen --restore && \ cb-compositor --start && \ sleep 2s && \ tint2 \ ) & This part is most likely the cause for your ...


2

Since the error message complains about /etc/init.d/mongodb not existing, try creating that file. This is probably enough to make progress in this case. In general, when an installation or removal script fails, look at /var/lib/dpkg/info/$PACKAGE.{preinst,postinst,prerm,postrm}. If it's a shell script, add set -x just below the #! line to make it print a ...


2

way to find the specific driver name lspci | grep -i network I am not sure whether that device is on the PCI or USB bus but you can try the following. Use lsusb or lspci to find information about the device Lookup that device for the corresponding module ("driver") Make sure that module is loaded and available with lsmod and modprobe Another Idea ...


2

Nothing would happen since a .exe file is meant for Windows, not Linux, so without Wine installed, and without a association to run .exe files from your mail client these files are essentially of no consequence to you. Still as a best practice you should typically never run things directly from email. You should instead get in the habit of doing a "Save ...



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