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2

You can use prtconf to get the bitness of the running kernel: $ prtconf -k Kernel Type: 64-bit You could also ls -l /unix or file /unix, but that's not guaranteed to be the kernel you're currently booted from. $ file /unix /unix: 64-bit XCOFF executable or object module not stripped $ ls -l /unix lrwxrwxrwx 1 root system 21 Dec 9 06:48 ...


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Kernel mode and user mode are a hardware feature, specifically a feature of the processor. Processors designed for mid-to-high-end systems (PC, feature phone, smartphone, all but the simplest network appliances, …) include this feature. Kernel mode can go by different names: supervisor mode, privileged mode, etc. On x86 (the processor type in PCs), it is ...


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"Linux" proper is only the kernel. When we talk about "Linux" as an operating system, it is a conflation of the kernel and all of the other software that is distributed with it in a Linux distribution. The switch between user and kernel mode happens when you make a system call, which is any of the functions documented in manual section 2. That is, if you ...


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Instant load: number of tasks running or waiting to run, or in another way, the number of tasks willing to run Load average: the measure above but exponentially averaged with previous samples of the same measure Both of these numbers are unbounded, and often much larger than N. To be clear: the load count on Linux includes threads, there is no doubt about ...


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A couple of reasons for having less active CPU's than available are: IBM POWER servers have something called capacity in demand, which means that you can buy a server with more CPU's installed than want to use initially, and activate them later when needed. Like in your case the servers has 16 CPUs installed, but only 8 are active. Another reason for ...


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That's the current CPU frequency; it can be scaled up and down. Have a look in /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0 (or 1, 2, 3), then the cpufreq directory. Check cat scaling_governor. It is probably ondemand (I believe that's the default kernel configuration). Now check scaling_available_frequencies; you'll see a list that for you should start with 2600000. ...


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If the process priority (nice value) is low then it will not be interrupting a higher priority process. The reason you're seeing the low priority process still consuming a significant amount of CPU when the higher priority process is running is because the higher priority process is not that busy. Probably waiting on IO. Use chrt -i 0 to run the process at ...


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For answering your question, let us first understand what is kondemand. kondemand is a kernel thread that belongs to the ondemand governor of cpufreq subsystem, which changes the p-states of the system, based on the utilization statistics. Thus it’s something that helps in power management. Reference on kondemand Now coming to your query that why ...


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This is automatic CPU frequency scaling. I suspect that the CPU used by it is actually idled CPU. You can test this by firing up a CPU benchmarking program. You should see the kondemand instances drop to 0% usage. The atop program will display the CPU scaling percentage as well. Different distributions handle this differently and you didn't post yours, so ...


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nice / renice nice is a great tool for 'one off' tweaks to a system. nice COMMAND cpulimit cpulimit if you need to run a CPU intensive job and having free CPU time is essential for the responsiveness of a system. cpulimit -l 50 COMMAND cgroups cgroups apply limits to a set of processes, rather than to just one cgcreate -g cpu:/cpulimited cgset -r ...



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