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Time-sliced threads are threads executed by a single CPU core without truly executing them at the same time (by switching between threads over and over again). This is the opposite of simultaneous multithreading, when multiple CPU cores execute many threads. Interrupts interrupt thread execution no matter of technology, and when interrupt handling code ...


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You can also use the command cat /proc/cpuinfo which will output a chunk of data for each core. Each chunk starts with this info: processor : 3 vendor_id : GenuineIntel cpu family : 6 model : 60 model name : Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-4210M CPU @ 2.60GHz (...) Cores are numbered starting from 0, so if the last chunk says processor : 3 as in this ...


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You have to look at Sockets and Cores per Socket. I this case you have 1 physical CPU (Socket) which has 4 cores (Cores per socket)


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CPU family is irrelevant here. CPU(s) = physical sockets Core(s) per socket - as it says so total number of cores = CPU(s) * Core(s) per socket In your case, you have total 4 full cores. What also can be important, is "Thread(s) per core". But you have 1, so not in your case.


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Most often top works in 'Irix' mode by default, just as you describe it. If you want to obtain a percentage of the total CPU capabilities (i.e. when the sum of the possible CPU usage adds up to 100% and not cpu_cores_number * 100%), just toggle the 'Irix' mode by pressing I.


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Give a second chance to conky, found this article on the interwebs: https://mylinuxramblings.wordpress.com/2010/03/23/how-to-configure-the-conky-system-monitor/


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How about nmon ? 'r' will give you CPU speed - but there is also a logging mode. http://nmon.sourceforge.net/pmwiki.php http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-analyze_aix/


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The setrlimit(2) syscall is relevant to limit resources (CPU time -integral number of seconds, so at least 1 sec- with RLIMIT_CPU, file size with RLIMIT_FSIZE, address space with RLIMIT_AS, etc...). You could also set up disk quotas. The wait4(2) syscall tells you -and gives feedback- about some resource usage. And proc(5) tells you a lot more, and also ...


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you can use Linux-dash script . Please check below for how to install . Url http://linuxdash.afaqtariq.com/#/system-status



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