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0

Looks to me like a hardware error, CPU or memory. If you have the possibility to use another CPU or swap memories in your PC, or try the same on another machine/CPU, you could rule out what hw is failing. Also you should update the firmwares of the BIOS and other hardware, it might help. Sometimes CPU microcode is refreshed with a BIOS update, that can ...


0

This is a hardware error. Specifically, it's an ECC memory error which was detected but not corrected. How can you tell? Pipe the output above through mcelog --ascii, and you'll get: Hardware event. This is not a software error. CPU 4 0 data cache TSC 22cd709f356 ADDR 5989fdd80 TIME 1462430327 Thu May 5 02:38:47 2016 Data cache ECC error (syndrome a0) ...


2

Tasks do represent the number of opened processes. (Note that I do not use the term "running" to avoid confusion.) You have to realize that not all opened processes consume CPU constantly. Each process can be in a number of different states: running: actively using CPU stopped: the process was stopped (paused) by the user defunc or zombie: process ...


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A process is a running instance of a program. The numbers mean that 24 tasks are receiving inputs from the terminal while the rest are running in the background. There is a very good post here: http://www.makeuseof.com/answers/single-core-processor-run-multiple-tasks/ Also here to learn more about linux processes: http://www.linfo.org/process.html


1

Is is hardly documented and largely depends on a platform. For x86, next available id is assigned to CPU in the function generic_processor_info() So, for x86, cpu ids are depending on order in which we would call that function. It is called when APIC (interrupt controller) is initialized, while APIC settings are taken from ACPI MADT table and the ACPI ...


1

Based on your output of sensors, it appears that lm_sensors does not detect any fan speed reading. You should try running sensors-detect and answer yes to all questions to hopefully detect one that wasn't previously configured. If not, then it simply won't be possible to control those fans. The BIOS controls the fans with a PWM, but its control is usually ...


3

To debug problems with scheduling or applications performance on Linux, it is a good start to run task under perf stat. It reports statistics about the processor pipeline, its stalled cycles, or memory behaviour. Possible problems: Linux/Scheduler bug Intel HT is not keeping up with your threads Memory is not able to provide enough data for the program ...


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The CPU's temperature shouldn't rise that high if the issue was limited to software unless you updated the kernel with disabled frequency scaling options. If you leave the computer idle for 30 minutes (closing down your browser even if it appears to be doing next to nothing) and the temperature doesn't drop below 70C, you should check the ventilation and ...


1

To get a complete picture you need to look at the number of threads per core, cores per socket and sockets. If you multiply these numbers you will get the number of CPUs on your system. CPUs = Threads per core X cores per socket X sockets CPUs are what you see when you run htop (these do not equate to physical CPUs). Here is an example from a desktop ...


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Digging up a really old question here - but I had this same issue. For me the problem ended up being MYSQLD running. To started I noticed my healthchecks started failing after switching to a t1-nano ubuntu instance in ec2 (1 core 512 ram). At the time I thought this would be fine b/c I was only running nginx with a static health check, a 301 entry and a ...


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For reference, it's usually better to at least run vmstat -wtI 5 3 (-w gives wide output, -t gives timestamps so it's easier later to correlate your numbers to other performance monitoring results you may have running in parallel, and -I gives additional columns for file pagein/pageout) as you ran it for 60 seconds, and only looking at the vmstat output for ...


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What's probably happening is that the CPU goes into a more aggressive power-save mode. This causes the internal switch-mode voltage regulators to go into a pulse-skipping mode, moving the switching frequency down to the audible range. The noise comes from the inductors and capacitors, both being slightly microphonic (which also works in reverse; the emit ...


3

On Debian or Ubuntu install stress-ng with apt-get install stress-ng. Then run: stress-ng -c 1 -l 50 playing with -c (number of CPUs) and -l (percentage load) parameters. For Fedora/RedHat/CentOS it seems you have to compile it (source repository is here) with the following procedure: wget ...


0

According to IBM documentation [1], the field r shows the number of runnable threads, precisely, the number of threads already running + number of threads waiting in a queue. So, if r < lcpu, it means all the threads are on CPU and you have no threads waiting in a queue. In your case, 11 threads are running, and you even have 1 spare lcpu. Let's say r = ...


1

See kernel/sched/loadavg.c which has a long and excellent comment at the start explaining the derivation of load average from a exponentially decaying average of the number of runnable threads (the "run queue") plus the number of uninterruptable threads (waiting on I/O or waiting on a lock). Here's the essence of the comment, but it is worthwhile reading in ...


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It is possible to add a virtual core to a virtual machine by making use of the hypervisor controls. It is not possible to do so to a physical machine outside of something like turning on hyperthreading int he BIOS (assuming it's not already on).


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Yes, Linux's scheduler keeps track of where each thread was last scheduled, and favors keeping a thread on the same CPU if it can. You guessed the reason: migrating a thread from a CPU to another is more expensive than keeping it on the same CPU. There's even more to it: the scheduler knows about multiple levels of cache coherency, and tries not to migrate ...


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What's the version of supervisord? Old supervisord seems to have high CPU occupation issues. And regarding the laravel queue worker, use queue:work --daemon to reduce the CPU impact, according to https://laravel.com/docs/5.1/queues#daemon-queue-listener The queue:work Artisan command includes a --daemon option for forcing the queue worker to continue ...


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According to relevant bug reports (e.g., FS#41728 - [systemd] coredumps, 100% cpu usage, X hanging and systemd-coredump 100% CPU usage), core dumps in Linux are initiated in the kernel, with it copying the data out to userspace. That is where the time goes. You can generally interrupt things running as yourself, but not the kernel processes. Further ...



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