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There is probably no way to stop the CPU fan from software, especially if you use an old computer. If you really want to stop the fan, you should probably just open the computer and detach the cable connecting the fan to the motherboard. At next reboot your BIOS may complain that the fan is not working (it does so in order to protect the CPU from ...


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I think you'll need to call taskset once per thread, i.e. use ps -eL instead of pgrep and pipe that to taskset -cp 0 ps -eLo cmd,tid | grep python | perl -pe 's/.* (\d+)$/\1/' | xargs -n 1 taskset -cp 0 This calls task set for all thread ids.


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Something makes you think that the video card driver is responsible for the 100% CPU usage, however this needs to be verified. I suggest doing the following: find the id of the process that is taking 100% CPU e.g. pgrep gala, let's call this pid number $PID; if you find more than one process id, be sure to be pick the one that is responsible for the 100% ...


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Have a look at cgroups, it should provide exactly what you need - CPU reservations (and more). I'd suggest reading controlling priority of applications using cgroups. That said, put the important yet often idle processes into group with allocated 95% of CPU and your other applications into another one with allocated 5% - you'll get (almost) all of the power ...


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@muru cpulimit looks way better I think you got mixed up with nice nice ranges at least from -20 resulting favorable scheduling through 19, least favorable. The default behavior is to increase the niceness by 10 which you did. But here is the issue: a nice should not be confused with a scheduling priority, which lets applications determine the order in ...


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Coincidence: I just came across the cpulimit command. It limits the CPU usage of a process (to a certain %, for example). An example from the manpage: # cpulimit -l 20 firefox Launch Firefox web browser and limit its CPU usage to 20%



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