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1

You can try this in terminal: sudo lscpu This will give you an overview of your cpu physical trait. As for turbo boost or not, this is purely hardware control than the OS itself, so unless Intel has a specific drivers for Linux that can tune your processor speed, there's no solid lead to check the turbo boost state (unless there's a command code for it. ...


3

The words “CPU”, “processor” and “core” are used in somewhat confusing ways. They refer to the processor architecture. A core is the smallest independent unit that implements a general-purpose processor; a processor is an assemblage of cores (on some ARM systems, a processor is an assemblage of clusters which themselves are assemblages of cores). A chip can ...


0

System load and cpu% are two different ways to measure how your cpu power is used. system load: how many processes per cpu have been in "ready" state - averaged over some time. Up to 1*cpu (in your case up to 4) the system is regarded as nearly idle (compare with a supermarket where on average only one customer is waiting at every checkout). You will ...


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Just answering your first question. In the output of cat /proc/cpuinfo you can see the following information:- physical id : 0 siblings : 4 core id : 0 cpu cores : 2 You can see the count of siblings is 4 and cpu cores is 2. cpu cores being 2 is that total number of cores in the processor which can be checked from the spec given in the intel's ...


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As Patrick has indicated in a commnt, you got the path under /sys wrong. echo 0 > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu3/online If you want to switch them all off (except cpu0 which can't be switched off): for x in /sys/devices/system/cpu*/online; do echo 0 >"$x" done Typing maxcpus=1 at a shell prompt has no effect. More precisely, it sets the ...


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I've once created a script which does exactly what you want. #!/bin/bash trap '' SIGQUIT trap '' SIGTSTP trap '' SIGINT version() { cat << EOF ------------------------------------------------------------- ## Description [Disable logical cores to save power on laptop batteries] ## Copyright [Free to modify and improve] ## ...


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You could also use the GUI application XSensors. It will show you multiple tabs. One of them will be atk0110 as in the output you posted. One of the other tabs should display the core temperatures (may have the name coretemp). Image from linuxtoolkit.blogspot.com


4

Use sensors-detect to configure the missing sensors, if they are available. At my machine, there is a second sensor device handling the per-core sensors: [...] coretemp-isa-0000 Adapter: ISA adapter Physical id 0: +54.0°C (high = +80.0°C, crit = +98.0°C) Core 0: +53.0°C (high = +80.0°C, crit = +98.0°C) Core 1: +53.0°C (high = +80.0°C, ...


5

%CPU -- CPU Usage : The percentage of your CPU that is being used by the process. By default, top displays this as a percentage of a single CPU. On multi-core systems, you can have percentages that are greater than 100%. For example, if 3 cores are at 60% use, top will show a CPU use of 180%. See here for more information. You can toggle this ...


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It means you have a lot of cores. One core at max is 100%. So the highest it can be is number_of_cores × 100%. You may want to look at why your app it as 400%.


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Top shows usage over some time period - by default, something like 3 seconds. It basically tells you what percentage of CPU time a particular process ID used over that interval. And note that this percentage can be over 100% - if you had one process running two threads and keeping both cores of a dual core system busy, you'd see a number around 195% in the ...


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It is statistics: 50% means “half of cpu over a time”, if you look deeper you can find what that time is.


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I wrote a Python script that simply spins up some threads and burns CPU cycles. The idea is to test taskset against it, as it's quite simple. #!/usr/bin/env python import threading def cycle_burner(): while True: meh = 84908230489 % 323422 for i in range(3): thread = threading.Thread(target=cycle_burner) print "Starting a thread" ...



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