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In XTerm, you can use the control sequences in your .bashrc or such. Like: if tty -s; then case $HOSTNAME in server1) echo -e '\e]11;darkgray\a\e]10;black\a' ;; server2) echo -e '\e]11;darkblue\a\e]10;gray\a' ;; esac fi Other terminal emulators have similar features. In Putty, you can configure the color directly, not sure if these control ...


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You don't need to mess with init scripts. In Debian, you can just add a line in /etc/init.d/rc.local that calls the program; it will then be run after all the init scripts. If you call the program in /etc/init.d/boot.local instead, it will run only at boot, not when switching runlevels.


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I just found the solution to my problem, which occurred on new installations of both Debian 7 and Debian 8. The problem was that the kernel did not switch the graphic mode during boot. I noticed some error messages in the log complaining that firmware-linux-nonfree was missing. Doing $ sudo apt-get install firmware-linux-nonfree solved the problem.


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Those are ANSI escape codes. ^[ is the notation your shell uses to display an ESC byte (ASCII byte 27). So your example is an ESC byte followed by the text [A. As you can see in the Wikipedia article, ^[[ (ESC followed by [) is a Control Sequence Introducer or CSI. CSI A means move the cursor up by one column. If you want to see an escape code in the ...



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