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1

I'm not aware of a utility that will do this. However, you could have a fair stab at implementing your own using the /dev/vcs* devices. The man page for vcs gives an example program that not only writes to a terminal screen via /dev/vcsN but also sets attributes via /dev/vcsaN. A trivial demonstration can be seen with the following sample shell code. Note ...


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It is common for the login code for the display manager to load and/or configure a number of modules for a number of services including sound when a user logs in. Starting in text mode, and using startX to get start the graphical interface bypasses this setup. Normally, there are text mode windows available using key combinations. This provides ready ...


1

Linux has multiple virtual consoles. Ctrl+Alt+Fn switches between these consoles. When you switch from console 7 to console 2, the input and output peripherals are re-routed from console 7 to console 2. When console 7 is inactive, it has no access to the input/output peripherals: the display isn't shown on the screen, the applications don't receive keyboard ...


1

A while back, people used computer terminals to input data into, or display data from, a Unix mainframe. If any of this terminal users wanted to, let's say, cat /dev/zero, the output was not broadcasted to all terminals/users connected to the same mainframe (that's because it was a multi user system, and each user could run it's tasks without affecting other ...


1

If using bash, then first run shopt -s failglob Or better, put in your .bashrc Now whenever you do: ln -nfs origin_directory/*.pdf -t . It will succeed or fail (with an error message, and do nothing). from manual failglob If set, patterns which fail to match filenames during pathname expansion result in an expansion error.


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on bash this would work if [ -e origin_directory/*.pdf ] ; then ln -nfs origin_directory/*.pdf . ; fi EDIT: In case you have too many files if [ $(ls origin_directory/*.pdf | wc -l) -gt "0" ] ; then ln -nfs origin_directory/*.pdf . ; fi


2

I wrote a little C program to print three lines of bricks across the terminal for this purpose. Not empty space, but it helps give visual separation in the same way, and stands out in verbose output that might have a bunch of vertical space. Swap out your favorite character to taste: #include <termios.h> #include <sys/ioctl.h> #include ...


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Just clear twice! Example: clear; clear; echo "Hello World"


0

This is sort of a sideways answer to your question, but I prefer using an inverted prompt (which stands out and is easy to spot) for just the purpose of quickly being able to determine where in the scrollback the last command was run. You can invert your prompt's color (i.e. black text on white background) by adding the ANSI sequences <esc>[7m ...


1

Another approach could be to have some unique text in your prompt (I use $ followed by a non-breaking space (PS1=$'$\ua0')). And configure your terminal emulator to scroll-back to it upon some key press. For instance, with GNU screen, in ~/.screenrc: defscrollback 5000 bindkey \033` eval copy "stuff k?$\240\r" Would map that to Alt+Backtick


1

You can use clear multiple times (clear;clear) or just hold down Ctrl+L until you satisfy! With zsh, you can try (fun with repeat):- repeat 5 clear repeat 20 echo repeat 50 printf '\n' And of-course you may want to alias goaway='repeat 7 clear'.


1

I trust you already have enough ways to abbreviate echo -e "\n\n\n\n\n\n", so I won't add to that. But you have another option: Many terminal emulators support searching, so you can go to the start of the last command by searching backwards for some part of your prompt. (Or for some known string in the output, but the prompt is always there.) TBH I usually ...


2

There are a few options that spring to mind Spacer lines: sl() { yes '' | head -"${1:-5}"; } # Use as "sl 10" or "sl" Pipe the output of your make through a pager: make {whatever} 2>&1 | less Run the entire session under screen. You can then Ctrl AEsc and scroll up through the buffer a page at a time using Ctrl B. Use ReturnReturn to exit ...


0

bash script to print a custom number of newlines: #!/bin/bash if [[ "$1" =~ ^[0-9]+$ ]] then for ((i=0; i<$1; i++)) do echo done exit 0 fi exit 1 Name it (say script.bash) and put it in your $PATH (say in /usr/bin), run chmod +x /usr/bin/script.bash and call it with script.bash <number_of_lines>, or put it wherever you ...


1

I have alias five='echo -e "\n\n\n\n"' for that, you can further shorten the alias to your liking of course.


0

The font in the image you supplied is the VGA font (I believe people refer to it as the VGA 437 font, but it's ambiguous; take a look at the wikipedia page.) This rendering is not something specific to Linux – it's your graphics card's rendition. Every graphics card I've used has used this particular rendering by default. I found a TTF clone of it here. The ...


2

If you have xterm installed on the pi it should have included the luit terminal UTF-8 application - which is a little program which is often used to translate for other types of terminal applications that are not UTF-8 aware. luit works by allocating a pseudo-terminal - in much the way screen does but with a lot less overhead. One thing luit can do very ...


3

Interesting, I also thought of screen -x or tmux attach like Celada's solution, but I would prefer setting up init (in /etc/inittab or /etc/init or /etc/systemd) or supervisor to automatically launch a getty-on-screen session on boot. Working configuration for supervisor: [program:screen] command=bash -c 'chvt 9 && TERM=linux exec screen getty tty ...


3

I'm not sure whether there might be a more "direct" solution involving only redirecting inputs and outputs, but I did manage to make something like this work using screen. The idea is to do all your work inside a screen session and attach twice to the session, once from your working SSH terminal and once from the attached display. First, you will need to ...


1

See http://askubuntu.com/questions/630118/ and http://askubuntu.com/questions/328463/. This problem seems to be caused by a mismatch in the naming of fonts that console-setup expects vs what are in /usr/share/consolefonts/, and thus copied to /etc/console-setup/ when you pick a font to use (using dpkg-reconfigure console-setup). If you go to a console and ...


5

I've used tmate which is based on tmux successfully to share terminal during remote pair programing sessions. Google hangout's will also allow sharing of a single window, although I have the impression it uses more bandwidth. http://tmate.io


4

You can try Ctrl+Alt+F2, or F3 or F4... Unless it was changed in Fedora 22, graphical server is started on first terminal of Fedora instead of 7th in Ubuntu. P.S. If that works, use Ctrl+Alt+F1 to go back to graphical server.


0

[Putting some of the stuff from comments here as an answers so that this question may perhaps be marked answered.] First, select text via the mouse, then press either the middle button or Shift-Insert to paste. Note that you will need the VirtualBox or VMWare guest additions to copy/paste between the host and the guest. And you'll need to enable clipboard ...



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