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stty is irrelevant. The hardware line speed set via the line discipline has no meaning for a virtual terminal if it is non-zero. It only has meaning for "terminals" that are formed with actual serial devices, because it controls the serial device line speed. There's no serial device involved in the kernel's built-in terminal emulator. ywrap is not a ...


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loadkeys re-programs the terminal emulator that is built in to the kernel, via ioctl() requests through a kernel virtual terminal device. You aren't using that terminal emulator when you connect to the machine via ssh. Indeed, you aren't involving any terminal emulator, kernel or user space, on that machine at all. The terminal emulator on your local ...


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from a question i asked today (with credit to user @aecolley) : bind '"\C-m": "\C-l\C-j"' that works on GNU bash, version 3.2.53(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin14) and the other answers on this thread do not. also, this does not pollute history with 'clear' commands every other command.


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As described in the Remote Serial Console HOWTO: When multiple consoles are listed output is sent to all consoles and input is taken from the last listed console. The last console is the one Linux uses as the /dev/console device. You'll see messages from the kernel on all consoles but anything written to /dev/console (e.g. by init or systemd) will only ...


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Found my own answer in the keymaps man page. On my keyboard the CAPS LOCK has keycode 41. To remap it, you need the following keymap line, keycode 41 = backslash bar This will map CAPS LOCK to the backslash character, and SHIFT + CAPS LOCK to the bar (pipe) character.


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I had the same issue but for me, I had not provided the correct port for the memory card. I had to edit the script.fex and generate another script.bin and the system booted successful. Different boards have different ports. My board was an ITEAD AW2041, and it previous hanged at the same point awaiting on the mmcblk0p2


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These errors will be passed to your terminal from generally one of two places. Either a) A running process from your existing shell is sending these errors to your screen OR b) Syslog is passing the errors to your own account or the root account if you are logged in as root. Or it is directing to a specific terminal. The former can only be fixed by ...


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This question is a bit old, but I was looking for something similar, and found it here. It creates a second session that shares windows with the first, but has its own view and cursor. tmux new-session -s alice tmux new-session -t alice -s bob If the sharing is happening between two user accounts, you may still have to mess with permissions (which it ...


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This turns out to be related to a BIOS setting. I don't know if this setting has the same name in every BIOS, but in mine (AMIBIOS) it's called iGPU Multi-monitor. (It can be found in the Advanced > System Agent Configuration > Graphics section.) Set it to [Disabled], and the TTYs will appear on the PCI-E GPU's monitor.


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In principle, you should be able to do it with the venerable xset command. xset led named 'Caps Lock' or xset led 4 to set LED number 4, if your system doesn't recognize the LEDs by name. However, this doesn't seem to work reliably. On my machine, I can only set Scroll Lock this way, and I'm not the only one. This seems to be a matter of XKB ...


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I guess this has something to do with a font. In text mode different fonts are used than in X. Doing a simple googling says that it might be not possible to achieve in text mode Arch Linux forum and LFS Console


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If you are suggesting that nl should buffer the entire input simply to measure the maximum required number, that is not in the spirit of stream filters at all. With rare exceptions (sort, for instance), core utilities try to process streams immediately -- especially as they may be used in a virtually infinite pipeline (for instance, a loging stream that is ...


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The seq 0 10000000 is expanding to ten million and one lines, which bash needs to store in its memory so that it can loop over the values. That is what breaks, I managed to terminate it before it used up all the memory + swap on my system (I didn't want the out-of-memory to kill some other process, although modern kernels will correctly determine which ...


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To make less run in a different encoding from the terminal's, use luit (which ships with the X11 utility suite). LANG=ru_RU.CP1251 luit less subs.srt If you want to detect the encoding automatically, that's trickier, because a text file carries no indication of its encoding. The software Enca tries to recognize the encoding of a file based on its ...


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You can use watch command to constantly running w (every some time defined in -n parameter). For example: watch -n 1 w will run w every second. Output of w will be kept on top of the terminal window.


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Try dropping your system into single-user mode To do this (I'm going to assume you're using GRUB, instructions are similar for other bootloaders), hold shift during bootup. Select the default entry and modify it. Append single to the end of the boot options When the system boots up, it should drop you into a fully functional terminal Alternatively, if ...


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It would be a kernel change. The active kernel virtual terminal number is initialized to zero (i.e. the first virtual terminal, vt1) in the con_init() function in the kernel. You can of course change the active kernel virtual terminal after bootstrap with the chvt command. But starting the bootstrap with a different active kernel virtual terminal cannot ...


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You have PolicyKit. PolicyKit is a client-server system for controlling who is authorized to do what. A trusted program, such as NetworkManager, asks PolicyKit through a Remote Procedure Call whether the user who invoked it is authorized to perform the action that xe has requested. The rules for actions, processed by the authorization server, are in the ...


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In general, obtaining the current colours is impossible. The control sequence processing of a terminal happens "inside" the terminal, wherever that happens to be. With a terminal emulator such as xterm or the one built into an operating system kernel that provides the kernel virtual terminals, the internal state of the emulator, including its notion of the ...


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Edit: When I wrote this answer, the question was "Remap keyboard on Linux" Later the question reduced its scope to "Remap keyboard on the Linux console" committed to graphicless mode. The answer is not adjusted the the current question! Remap keyboard in graphic mode -- Using xmodmap (a small case-study answer): In PT keyboards '{}[]' are located in ...


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Linux uses two independent keyboard mappings. One for the graphical mode X and one for the console. You usually change the first one with setxkbmap (or xmodmap) and the second one with loadkeys. All those tool have a fine manpage. For loadkeys you can find the existing keymaps under /usr/share/kbd/keymaps. The description of those files is available in man ...


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use vidcontrol MODE_xxx For example to have a screen 1024x768x24, in the console : # vidcontrol MODE_280 To know which mode you can be interested in, in the console : # vidcontrol -i mode The left column gives you the number you have to put after MODE_


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@Spack's answer didn't work for my raspberry-pi, but I found a set of instructions that did work for me here To sum it up sudo dpkg-reconfigure console-setup #select "UTF-8" #select "Guess optimal character set" #select "Terminus" #select 16*32 (my selection for a 7 inch monitor on raspberry pi)



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