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Set the Reply-Message in an update reply block, rather than update control. Using your example: update reply { Reply-Message := "Login Failed. MAC Address %{Calling-Station-ID} is NOT valid." }


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As you mentioned that it should be an automated shell script, at least for the two yum commands you would need to add -y so yum will assume an answer of "yes" for all questions it will ask. See the yum man page, relevant excerpt: -y, --assumeyes Assume yes; assume that the answer to any question which would be asked is yes. ...


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Java runtimes honor environment variables, you could set them in system startup files. Oracle Java uses _JAVA_OPTIONS, IBM Java uses IBM_JAVA_OPTIONS.


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Place all openvpn *.conf files into /etc/openvpn/. Edit /etc/default/openvpn. Uncomment this: AUTOSTART="all" Run systemctl daemon-reload. Run service openvpn start. ??????? PROFIT


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Your netmaks are incorrect. If you want to include private networks, you should use : 10.0.0.0/8,172.16.0.0/12,192.168.0.0/16 This is probably why you do not match, rather than a ssh bug.


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I was answering similar question on Superuser.com, but after the responses I am not longer sure if it is right. In short, I believe that it is currently not possible and even openssh-7.0 is out, but these bugs were not fixed so we will have to urge upstream. Also there is alternative answer with positive feedback, but I guess this is the way how you are ...


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You have several pieces to your question, and I can't claim familiarity with all of the commands you run, but here's my take: Either run the whole script as root (directly) or via sudo. That way, you won't need to run sudo in the script itself. If you require sudo for a particular step, then you'll either need to set your ID up with a NOPASSWD flag in ...


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This blog is misleading as the commands shown are changing the nodename, not the hostname. The nodename match by convention the hostname associated with the primary network interface (if any) but there is no requirement for them to be in sync, especially when the system uses a dynamic network configuration (dhcp). See ...


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Yes, /etc/inet/hosts (or /etc/hosts) and /etc/inet/ipnodes should be updated manually, they are relative to the network stack and not the hostname of the machine.


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Thanks to @Gilles' answer I installed xinput and discovered what my touchscreen device was called: xinput list ⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] ⎜ ↳ Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)] ⎜ ↳ ft5x_ts id=7 [slave pointer (2)] ⎜ ↳ GiGa HiD ...


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xinput controls input settings. It has the same role for input that xrandr has for the display. Run xinput list to list devices. Each device has a name and a numerical ID. You can use either this name or this ID to list properties of the corresponding device. Device IDs can depend on the order in which the devices are detected, so to target a specific ...


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Assuming you have root access to the machine, you could write an installation routine. I made a few assumptions, as the availability of apt-get #script, saved local, executed on ssh server: #install tools: apt-get -y install tool1 tool2 #be careful with the -y option, though #new zsh tools: #load standard .zshrc file echo . /home/user/.zshrc > ...


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Did something happen back in the day that divided the dev crowd into ... camps ...? You may be looking at the chronology backwards.  "Back in the day" the "Unix dev crowd" was all at AT&T Bell Laboratories.  (If you provide enough power to the flux capacitor, you may be able to go back to a time when the "Unix dev crowd" was two people, and they may ...


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Considering the diversity above, what is the most accepted approach for naming configs? Whatever you want to call them. File extensions don't matter much beyond letting an admin know what the file probably is. A human is probably going to know that *.cfg and *.conf are both probably config files. The *.cnf I've only ever seen with MySQL which is a ...


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It's a way to organise your config into logical files. It's generally easier to find ssl.conf instead of parsing through 1000 lines of httpd.conf for the ssl section. On centos, conf/httpd.conf will include conf.d/*.conf. This is probably loaded in same order the shell globs *.conf which basically amounts to alphabetical order (but I've never checked the ...


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Possible locations for the configuration file are /etc/asound.conf for all users, or ~/.asoundrc for a single user. The file ~/.asoundrc.asoundconf is a file created by the asoundconf tool, and should not be edited by hand.


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When looking at your PATH, it seems that somewhere in your start-up scripts an application tries to add itself to PATH but does it incorrectly. The reason for that is that your PATH contains the string $PATH, which should have expanded to the actual path, but was included literally as the string $PATH. The fact that the Java path follows $PATH in your path ...


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You can execute the following command to add /bin, or whichever directory you need, to PATH. export PATH="$PATH:/bin" You can then add that line to .profile or .bashrc (if you use bash) to make sure that directory is included in your path each time you log in.



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