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2

No, you can't. At least not directly. tar doesn't do any compression. It merely reads part of the (virtual) file system, and generates one cohesive stream from it. This stream is then often passed to a compression tool/library, for instance gzip/libz. The compression part does not see or even know about individual files. It just compresses the stream ...


4

tar itself does not have this feature, you could only filter it so you have two independent tar files, one holding the compressed files, another for the uncompressed files. This can be achieved using tar's exclude option you mentioned, or by building file lists using find. If you are open to alternatives, there is dar (disk archive) which can decide whether ...


2

I don't know any way of doing this even with GNU tar. tar collects the files and then compresses the resulting stream (it's actually the equivalent of tar ... | gzip > somefile.tgz so by the time the compression is applied there is no awareness of individual files.


5

The file starts out in plain ASCII so it's uncompressed. $ hexdump -C db_stepup.sql.gz | less 00000000 2d 2d 20 70 68 70 4d 79 41 64 6d 69 6e 20 53 51 |-- phpMyAdmin SQ| 00000010 4c 20 44 75 6d 70 0a 2d 2d 20 76 65 72 73 69 6f |L Dump.-- versio| 00000020 6e 20 34 2e 31 2e 31 34 2e 38 0a 2d 2d 20 68 74 |n 4.1.14.8.-- ht| [...] That goes on for a ...


0

Do you really need to use NTFS compression? Maybe will be better to compress with .tar.tgz using --rsyncable option. It will only send the differences of .tar.gz and will save network bandwidth. If you really need more compress level, you can use gzip -9. And if you really need save more space, you can use rdiff-backupt to save only the differences (you ...


1

When a filesystem provides compression it is usually intended to be transparent, so that there should be no difference between the original file and a compressed version, apart from some meta-data such as the actual number of physical blocks used. This would seem to be the case with Linux NTFS-3g. By default rsync only compares timestamps and sizes of files ...



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