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Someone may have a script (or write one). I do this sort of thing either using zip, or a script which uses gzip or bzip2. Both have provisions for removing the files after the archive is complete. The issues are you can certainly write compressed archives for each directory until the archive is complete, you cannot remove the directory you cannot update ...


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In case there are several images inside here is a quick bash script to extract them all: #!/bin/bash sourceFile=uImage declare -ia sizes=( $(mkimage -l "$sourceFile" | grep '^ Image [0-9]+' | awk -F ' ' 'BEGIN { ORS = " " } { print $3 }') ) declare -i currOffset="68+4*${#lens[@]}" declare -i size for i in "${!sizes[@]}"; do size=${sizes[$i]} ...


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There is a Linux module called cloop (compressed loop), packaged along with some corresponding utilities, e.g. on Debian. You can mount these images in compressed state. Caveat: Read-Only. Also, you have to specifically create them, sda1.img.gz wont just mount. In an nutshell: # create_compressed_fs - blocksize < /dev/xyz > imageName.cloop # insmod ...


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I suppose that dd image means a compressed copy of some partition that contained a filesystem. In general, you can't mount such a compressed image, as it is not suitable for random access. You would need to decompress it, then you can mount it and access the filesystem. If you want a filesystem which compresses data automatically (like the Windows ...


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To create a compressed image on the fly: gzip < /path/to/inpurt >/path/to/image.gz To read a compressed image on the fly: zcat /path/to/image.gz > /path/to/output


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You'll need to use 2-pass encoding to "fit" a video within a designated file size (bitrate), without reducing the quality too drastically. This is quite a detailed topic: http://www.mpabo.com/2014/12/14/ffmpeg-and-x264-encoding-guide/


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There are a few options. If you can choose the filesystem of the system, then just use Btrfs filesystem and enable compression for the required directories by using chattr: chattr +c /myfolder If choosing the filesystem is not an option, then look into fusecompress https://github.com/tex/fusecompress Edit: AIX specific solution would be to use JFS1 ...


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It's important to understand there's a trade-off here. tar means tape archiver. On a tape, you do mostly sequential reading and writing. Tapes are rarely used nowadays, but tar is still used for its ability to read and write its data as a stream. You can do: tar cf - files | gzip | ssh host 'cd dest && gunzip | tar xf -' You can't do that with ...


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why people use it so much despite this drawback? Corporate and Academic admins are often more noticed when things break, than appreciated when things run efficiently. Such environments breed fear of experimentation, and scorn for novelty. what choice(I mean other software/tool) do I have if I want the "instant content listing" capability? ...



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