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10

In short, you want something like xrandr --output LVDS --scale 1.28x1.28 (replacing LVDS with the desired output name, as seen in the output of running xrandr by itself). Give it a try. Some sites said that this doesn't work on some systems that are using KMS (kernel mode setting); if so, that's a bug that's hopefully fixed. See these links for some ...


4

You already pointed out two options that I was going to suggest :) Anyway I think it's worth making clear that you have many options. Stick with Ubuntu 10.04 for now. This is not a long term option, because eventually you will run out of updates (3 years for desktops, 5 years for servers). And who wants to use outdated software anyway, especially when it's ...


4

I think this wiki page is what you are looking for.


3

What you refer to as a windowing system is more commonly referred to as a display server. The differences between display servers are well documented. But, the difference between a display server and a window manager is in the job that they perform. A display server handles displaying graphical applications and relaying input and output from graphical ...


3

You might be able to do it through ccsm. In the animations plugin, you can add specific rules for specific programs or classes of programs: Clicking on "New" will bring up this dialog: If you click on the + sign to the right of "Window Match" you will (finally) get to this window: If you now click on "Grab" and then click on the menu you are referring ...


3

Xubuntu. XFCE looks better and is less spartan than LXDE, I've kept the beloved Ubuntu, XFCE's panel is great, Compiz-Fusion works, drag-and-drop is no problem between Thunar (XFCE's file manager) and Nautilus (Gnome's one) and the desktop. A clean Xubuntu install would be better, but there're no major problems, I'm happy now.


2

In a way yes: You will be able to switch away from all the fancy new stuff and just use the gnome-panels like you did with Gnome 2. In this mode it should not be too difficult to replace the WM. However, in standard, fancy mode you will only be able to use Mutter aka Metacity 3. Gnome 3 is just too different, it uses lots and lots of composite effects to ...


2

OK, I found a way to solve this problem on Acer with Fedora 15 (thanks to Fedora forums and answers here): Update the BIOS to the lastest version. Edit /etc/Xorg/xorg.conf to add the following line under Section "Device": Option "RegistryDwords" "EnableBrightnessControl=1" Edit /boot/grub/grub.conf to add the parameters acpi_backlight=vendor ...


2

I was with the same problem in my laptop, a Dell Vostro 3300 with Ubuntu 11.04, this configuration solved my problem. Edit /etc/Xorg/xorg.conf to add the following line under Section "Device": Option "RegistryDwords" "EnableBrightnessControl=1" Edit /etc/default/grub and addacpi_osi=Linuxto theGRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX` setting, i.e. ...


2

Change the gconf key with gconftool-2 --type string --set /desktop/gnome/session/required_components/windowmanager compiz You can go back to the default Gnome Metacity window manager with gconftool-2 --type string --set /desktop/gnome/session/required_components/windowmanager gnome-wm If this fails You can simply add compiz --replace ...


2

I thought that a lua script (started by Conky) would be a good tool for this job. There's loads of conky examples on the internet (e.g. here and here), which could be used to make it snow on your desktop only when it's snowing outside, for example. I saw on a forum that some guy had posted some video tutorials on how to write a lua script for fireworks as ...


2

Use xsnow after having killed the desktop application that covers the root window. Run xkill and click on the desktop. That works at least in LXDE where pcmanfm usually handles the desktop, but should work in other environments as long as they don't require there being a desktop window in the background and don't restart it automatically when it dies.


2

Did you enable Window Decoration in ccsm? Otherwise no border is available. Also you should start compiz instead, which would call emerald


1

Actually it was simpler that I thought. Just use the right mouse click to do the opposite with the same shortcut (Win+Alt).


1

(Google debian compiz.) Debian Package Tracking System :: http://packages.qa.debian.org/c/compiz.html It was removed post squeeze as "buggy, and unmaintained".


1

Per a comment discussion below the question, asker thought the window manager was called Macro instead of Marco, and thus got the binary name wrong.


1

Compiz packages have been moved to the AUR (Arch User Repository). This repository is unsupported so is not accessible by pacman. You can download the packages you require and use makepkg to install them. See the Arch Wiki AUR page for the details on using this repository.


1

The answer is yes and no... No, you cannot enable the grid functionality of Compiz with the Visual Effects setting set to "none" as this actually disables Compiz for those devices that have no way to support running Compiz. However, you might be able to get away with customizing the effects available with Compiz to be the minimum required to support the ...


1

Happens for me too - very annoying. I used to have 5 workspaces in a row under Ubuntu 10.04. However, I did find that putting 4 workspaces in 2 rows stops the windows from jumping around. It's harder to click on a workspace but that's my fix for now.


1

Installed emerald and enabled Window decorator in ccsm, the title bar emerged.


1

The thread “Switch to specific workspace” shortcuts don't work after a reboot seems like it addresses your problem exactly. It uses the fact that Compiz "workspaces" are actually viewports of a single workspace. wmctrl -d is used to find out the size of the real workspace including all viewports. Dividing this by the number of viewports gives the size of ...


1

I'm running Ubuntu, and for some reason, some of the keyboard shortcuts are configured in "Ubuntu Unity Plugin". There I have the setting for "key to execute a command". So maybe you should look through all compiz plugins settings.


1

You can add compiz --replace line in your ~/.bashrc file, if you want to start it automatically on every login.


1

Debian Stable: Long term support. Very stable. Familiar system for a Ubuntu user. Edit: reply to comment Compiz should be just an apt-get away. See here: http://wiki.debian.org/Compiz I'm pretty sure that most modern X drivers don't require you to make the changes to xorg.conf.


1

I only had to add Option "RegistryDwords" "EnableBrightnessControl=1" to /etc/Xorg/xorg.conf. When adding the parameters (which are mentioned in other posts) to /etc/default/grub, the brightness adjustment did still work but displaying the brightness level when changing the brightness did not change any more. Im running Ubuntu 11.10 and Gnome3, on a ...


1

You should be able to change the settings by right clicking on the bottom pannel. If I remember; there is a check box that says something like "keep windows on their own desktop" or something to that effect.


1

I know it's the same questions (and person asking), but as I was looking for the same answer I thought that crosslinking to solution can be useful for other people: http://askubuntu.com/questions/20113/how-to-stop-mod4-p-from-switching-the-display/20273#20273


1

Since the same key has bugged me both in Windows (inconveniently switching out of games at the wrong time), and Linux, I have levered off the Keycap itself so I will never accidentally hit it. However, for a less extreme remedy, you should be able to use xmodmap - (oldish) man page http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/hardy/man1/xmodmap.1.html


1

The Compiz “place windows” feature works for me. It won’t work if you just use gedit, though. Try title=gedit:



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