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ext2fs.h is provided by the e2fslibs-dev package. So perhaps check if you have e2fslibs-dev installed.


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I was able to make a portable version of Emacs 24 on CentOS 7. The same approach should work on Debian. The first thing I did was to install a virtual machine with a fresh copy of the OS, to ensure that I have root and can install any required libraries and tools. My initial attempt to create a portable install involved installing the emacs package on a ...


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The PATH environment variable is the search path for executables, not for other kinds of files. For include files, you need to arrange to pass the option -I/usr/include/gtk-3.0/gtk to the compiler. Typically, you do that by setting a variable defined by a makefile (usually CFLAGS='-I/usr/include/gtk-3.0/gtk'), or by passing an argument to ./configure ...


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Adding the appropriate directory to your include path is exactly what you're supposed to do in this case, only you're supposed to do it by pkg-config. Accessing the files directly using full pathnames is unsupported. Add something like this to your Makefile: CFLAGS += `pkg-config --cflags gtk+-3.0` LIBS += `pkg-config --libs gtk+-3.0` This will ...


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If you don't create a configuration file of your own, then it has to be GENERIC. GENERIC is the name of the configuration file to use when setting up the kernel compilation. You can create your own kernel configuration by copying GENERIC to something else and then editing it. The you would put that name in for GENERIC. However, the OpenBSD project ...


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The OpenBSD FAQ is your friend in this case. They have extensive documentation on how to build your own kernel. In particular you want section 5.3.4 but before you do that make sure and read all of section 5.3 to get a feel for the bigger picture. I'd also recommend taking a look at Absolute OpenBSD by Michael Lucas. He's got a pretty good walk through on ...


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The -m option takes a directory name, not a filename. bmake -m /usr/local/share/mk Otherwise, your version of bmake doesn't match the version of the mk files in /usr/local/share/mk.


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The last time I had to build KDE from scratch I used this as a guide. It is from Linux From Scratch (in particular Beyond Linux From Scratch) and should help you through everything. A quick copy and paste shows this order: Automoc4-0.9.88 Phonon-4.8.2 Phonon-backend-gstreamer-4.8.0 Phonon-backend-vlc-0.8.1 Akonadi-1.13.0 Attica-0.4.2 QImageblitz-0.0.6 ...


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For my situation, I found the solution to be distcc, which eyoung100 suggested in the comments.


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You should think of a compiler as a function which generates output from some input, or output_program = compile_function(input_source, args) The exsistence of compile_function as a 32 or 64 bit binary affects how it does its job but not the output. If we grossly simplify the role of 64-bit to simply increasing the amount of addressable memory, then ...


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GCC on Solaris has some defaults that are different, for example, than GCC on Linux. For compiling 64 binaries you have to add -m64 to your compile and link lines. This makes GCC compatible to the Solaris Studio C compiler, in that respect. On SPARC, compiling programs as 32 bit does not have as much disadvantages as on e.g. x86, where 64 Bit also ...


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When building a custom kernel, most people DO NOT BUILD the source inside the source tarball either. Please consider using a soft link: As you can see the /usr/src/linux link points to /usr/src/linux-3.12.21-gentoo-r1 directory Thus, when issuing the make command, the resulting output is put in the top level directory of the build tree, which doesn't ...


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To build a kernel module, you need more than an unpacked kernel source. You need some companion programs and header files generated during the kernel build. The makefile is looking for modpost in the right place but it isn't there yet. Distributions typically ship this in a package called linux-headers-VERSION or kernel-headers-VERSION or something similar. ...


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You might want to look at Sabayon Linux, a child of Gentoo. It uses pre-compiled packages, a.k.a binaries stored in repos, that are remote. What actually happens is that maintainers configure the package using predetermined USE Flags, and then compile the package with portage. Then using the Sabayon Binary Package Manager, Entropy, the maintainers upload ...



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