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2

The fpm dev has this to say on the subject of distribution-specific guidelines: I want a simple way to create packages without all the bullshit. In my own infrastructure, I have no interest in Debian policy and RedHat packaging guidelines - I have interest in my group's own style culture and have a very strong interest in getting work done. (This is ...


2

If you want to take control of where various files will be installed you'll have to take responsibility for manually doing this within your RPM .spec file directly. Example Here's a snippet from a JBOSS RPM .spec file that I created in a blog series I wrote up a couple of years ago. The article in this series is titled: CentOS RPM Tutorial Part 3 - ...


0

The versions don't match. You have 2.12-1.7, but it's looking for 2.12-7.2. It's subtle, but enough for rpm to freak out. You can pass --nodeps to RPM to force the static package to install. If it doesn't work afterward, just remove the package.


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Busybox uses static libraries, so you have to install glibc-static (which I think is not in the RHEL6, you'll have to find it) in order to use Busybox with librcrypt.a and not the dynamic version.


1

Sometimes needs some patch. I've createad which you can apply and can build with gmake. I didn't try the compiled snapwm I've tested only building process. diff -ur Nextwm-master.orig/Makefile Nextwm-master/Makefile --- Nextwm-master.orig/Makefile 2014-03-12 19:46:34.000000000 +0100 +++ Nextwm-master/Makefile 2014-04-16 13:07:08.000000000 +0200 @@ -1,12 ...


2

make only reports the errors but they are in fact errors from your compiler (probably gcc): error: incompatible types when assigning to type ‘int’ from type ‘kuid_t’ Basically, your code is buggy or inappropriate for your platform but make functions correctly.


0

You do not want to do this. For example see: http://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2009-2409


1

Two problems: Your makefile is set up to use the Solaris C compiler's options, but you're using gcc. You don't say how your makefile was generated, but replacing CFLAGS with something more appropriate will help. If you used a configure script to generate your makefile then I'm a bit confused, as doing CC=gcc ./configure should be enough to do the right ...


3

The Linux kernel source hasn't had the CONFIG_IP_FORWARDING option since the 2.0.x kernel series. As far as I know, there is no compile time option anymore to enable IP forwarding by default for the built kernel. Since the 2.1.x series, the correct way to enable IP forwarding for IPv4 has been with the net.ipv4.ip_forward sysctl option. Add the following ...


-1

IP forwarding is a core functionality of the network code in Linux. That's why there is no configuration variable for it.


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I don't know of any solution for enabling it statically (and in at least recent kernels there's no CONFIG_IP_FORWARD - just greped the source). From a security perspective this doesn't seem to be a good idea anyways, since in many cases you might to configure some other things before enabling forwarding (filtering rules, QoS rules, [more exact] routing ...


0

Aren't you compiling it wrong? Shouldn't it be like: g++ `pkg-config --cflags opencv` -o test.cpp test or g++ `pkg-config --cflags opencv` test.cpp -o test


1

What makhlighi has explained in his last comment worked for me but I had to use different source code not the one from the official website www.apuebook.com. The one I used can be found in https://github.com/roktas/apue2e. As someone explained this one has been implemented in order to work with modern Linux system.


1

I see at least one thing missing: you're passing CFLAGS=-I/path/to/installation/include, which lets the compilation scripts find the header files, but you also need to let the compilation scripts find the library to link against (libncurses.a). Also the installation instructions say to use CPPFLAGS for the include directories, not CFLAGS. export ...


0

the only *.in files I have come across are config.in for specifying .configure steps with autoconf and automake. In this sense the *.in is a variables file. It keeps your script clean of variables, so you can have edit access to a variables file and run access on the script but not edit access on the script.


0

There files are templates, take look inside owsmangencert.sh.in CERTFILE=@SYSCONFDIR@/servercert.pem KEYFILE=@SYSCONFDIR@/serverkey.pem CNFFILE=@SYSCONFDIR@/ssleay.cnf @SYSCONFDIR@ will be replaced actual path After automake's configure, will be config.status generated, which will replace tokens with actual values, during make process. So thats ...


3

As far as I know, there is no single program that is meant to use use .in files, but using the suffix .in does hint at the fact that it's not the final file. Instead, the .in file will serve as a kind of template or input to generate the file with the same name but without the .in suffix. In the case of openwsman, an example you'll often find in packages ...


0

The kernel docs explain how to pack an image into the kernel itself. From kernel.org: What is rootfs? Rootfs is a special instance of ramfs (or tmpfs, if that's enabled), which is always present in 2.6 systems. You can't unmount rootfs for approximately the same reason you can't kill the init process; rather than having special code to check ...


3

On Android, like on many Linux-based systems, the kernel first mounts an initramfs on /. The initramfs is stored in RAM; it is loaded from a CPIO archive which is stored together with the kernel itself (or in some other place where the bootloader can find it). Most desktop Linux systems have a small initramfs which contains just enough programs and ...


0

sudo apt-­get install network­-manager­-pptp  sudo apt­-get install network­-manager­-vpnc sudo apt-­get install network­-manager­-openvpn  then , follow this tuto: http://snnyc.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/connecting-to-cisco-vpn-from-ubuntu-linux-12-04.pdf


2

Fedora 14 has hit its end of life. You won't find any of the YUM repositories necessary to do any installations such as this. You'll likely be able to find old RPMs which were part of F14 and may be able to install these manually, however. But I'd encourage you to just go with a more recent version of Fedora, say 19 or 20.


1

You need to check under >Device Drivers that "Serial ATA and Parallel ATA drivers" is <*> and as said in Help Section, make sure that you know the name of your (S)ATA host adaptater because you will be asked for it (lspci is your friend).


0

However, if I remove "(subbotin@avs234)" the kernel compiles just fine. You don't need this in the LOCALVERSION. "subbotin@avs234" is just the one that compiled the kernel (user@host). It's not part of the version string nor needed for anything related to the compilation of the kernel.


0

For those looking to do the same thing (or similar things), it's doable by creating a new compiler that use findfile, and reuse errorformat from some other compiler + slight modifications. The end result looks like: let s:gradlew = escape(findfile('gradlew', '.;') . " -b " . findfile('build.gradle', '.;'), ' \') if exists("current_compiler") finish ...


2

The linux-headers package is only needed when you want to compile sources, kernels or build other packages. Package description from debian: This package provides the architecture-specific kernel header files for Linux kernel 2.6.32-5-686, generally used for building out-of-tree kernel modules. These files are going to be installed into ...


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After downloading it when I run the ./configure command it complained about 2 libraries missing: checking for XCreateWindow in -lX11... no configure: WARNING: Xbindkeys depends on the X11 libraries! checking for guile... no configure: error: guile required but not found I had to install these 2 packages: $ sudo apt-get install guile-1.8-dev tk-dev ...



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