New answers tagged

1

As a sum up of the comments. One has to add the environment variables as follows. LD_LIBRARY_PATH="/home/<user>/lib" LIBRARY_PATH="/home/<user>/lib" CPATH="/home/<user>/include"


2

You should not have done the mkdir .config; you should have just copied the existing config file to a filename called .config in the kernel source directory. e.g. cd linux-yocto-3.14 cp /path/to/config-3.14.26-yocto-qemu .config make -j4 all


1

When compiling/installing from source, as with most software distributions like this, the service will not be installed. You need to do those steps manually (or with configuration management of some type). Here's an example that I find, specifically for Samba 4 on a systemd based Linux system. Translating from here: https://dev.tranquil.it/wiki/SAMBA_-...


0

The --with-native-system-header-dir option takes a relative path from the dir specified with the --with-sysroot option. So to make it work as intended, you need to pass --with-sysroot=${INSTALL_DIR} --with-native-system-header-dir=tools/include


0

Yes , you may be running the commands from incorrect place. download the source extract it using tar if it is an archive or compressed cd into the extracted directory run your commands there , such ./configure , and make , sudo make install Make sure for make command to work , there must be a Makefile in the directory where you are running the ...


3

Kusalananda's answer is the better approach generally; but in netatalk's case, upgrading the package to a newer version seems rather complex (at least, in the context of a distribution). Now that you've installed your locally-built version of netatalk, I would recommend the following approach (I'm assuming you extracted netatalk to a directory called ...


0

This is why packaging tools like yum, dpkg and rpm exists. I'm not a Rasbian user and I don't know if netatalk is available as a package for the system (checking... it seems to be). If it is available, that would be your first port of call. If it is available, but the version is too old, then I would contact the package maintainer about an update. If it ...


2

There's no general way to know which library is required to use a particular function. You need to look at the documentation of that library. A well-written tutorial or API reference should tell you, that's its job. You can at least get an idea of what library package is required: it's the same library package that contains the header file. How to determine ...


1

/usr/bin/ld : cannot find -lXmu -lXmu means libXmu.so , provided by the package libXmu-devel, 64bits. Please install, like # yum install libXmu-devel.x86_64


1

Those options work by passing options to the compiler, so the most straightforward way is to recompile the kernel. However for a reproducible and module-specific way kbuild allows you to set custom CFLAGs on a per-module basis. https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/kbuild/makefiles.txt You particularly want to set -fno-stack-protector for the modules ...


11

Your error message is: make: cc: Command not found which tells you that you are missing the C compiler. As @GAD3R suggests, installing the Development Tools group will correct this. You probably also need the pam-devel package. But, that said: there's really no reason to build pam_radius yourself, as it already exists in EPEL ("Extra Packages for ...


5

You need to install the Development Tools : sudo yum groupinstall 'Development Tools'


0

Your question doesn't specify if you are exporting the variables or not, so I'm operating on the assumption that you haven't exported them. Set your variables as you normally do, but before running the command you need to run, export each one. export LD_LIBRARY_PATH export CFLAGS In this way, you make the variable available to everything you run in that ...


1

As can be seen in the Catalogue of Built-In Rules: Linking a single object file n is made automatically from n.o by running the linker (usually called ld) via the C compiler. The precise recipe used is: $(CC) $(LDFLAGS) n.o $(LOADLIBES) $(LDLIBS) and Variables Used by Implicit Rules: LDFLAGS Extra flags to give to compilers when they ...


2

nixpkgs reorganized things since the accepted answer was posted and there is a new function for disabling tests. You now wrap any Haskell package with the nixpkgs.pkgs.haskell.lib.dontCheck function to disable tests. Here is an example Nix expression from one of my Haskell projects where I had to disable tests for the shared-memory dependency when building ...


0

My OS is x86_64 Packages.amd64 : g++44_4.4.7-ubuntu8_amd64.deb, gcc44_4-4-7-ubuntu8_amd64.deb, libstdc++44-dev_4.4.7-ubuntu8_amd64.deb, created with $ dpkg-deb -b Links : gcc44 https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7S255p3kFXNQlVHeXdPc25sSEE/view?usp=sharing g++44 https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7S255p3kFXNeU5jSG9ZdXNQQTQ/view?usp=sharing libstdc++44-dev ...


0

Removing the system gcc, mpfr is not a good idea. Please reinstall. (sudo apt-get install g++) And : You can have as many versions of gcc as you want, installed at the same time. The default compilers for Hardy : sudo apt-get install g++ g++-3.3 g++-3.4 g++-4.1 ,,, where g++ is the system compiler gcc/g++ version 4.2.4 . Compilers, gcc44, g++44 are ...


0

cpuid.h contains definitions of assembly-language fragments to get low-level info out of certain CPUs, plus names for various numeric constants that a program might use to figure out what kind of CPU it was running on, and what features are available. (For example, if the program wanted to use special matrix-math instructions available on some CPUs, it ...



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