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I ran into something like this before. I think the issue is that you're trying to compile gcc41 from AUR, using GCC 5.2.0-1 (latest arch version.) GCC adds new errors as versions go on, so the source code of older versions of GCC isn't always considered valid under newer versions of GCC. If you can find a way to disable this warning that might do the ...


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First of all, are you sure the files failed to compile? Warnings are usually just that (warnings, not errors). If you do want to compile with gcc-4.4.x, it is however still available from the Ubuntu 14.04 repositories, as package gcc-4.4 (although at least in 14.04.2 it appears to be minor version 4.4.7 rather than 4.4.6). You should be able to install it ...


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Ok, so five more minutes of searching might have helped me to find an answer. Here is an explanation of how to set gcc to an older version.


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You need to use a trick to circumvent automake's policing. See https://www.gnu.org/software/automake/manual/html_node/Uniform.html: This feature can also be used to override the sanity checks Automake performs to diagnose suspicious directory/primary couples (in the unlikely case these checks are undesirable, and you really know what you’re doing). For ...


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I faced this problem because of missing install command to create that specific directory. Once i have added the install command under %install, the rpm generated successfully install -m 755 -d $RPM_BUILD_ROOT%{_sysconfdir}/php.d


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You are missing a library called ncurses which is used by your application. Just install it with sudo yum install ncurses ncurses-devel As your are building it from sources, you'll need to satisfy the dependencies yourself. That's what rpm packages are meant for : listing dependencies, resolving and installing them so the requested package will work. Edit: ...


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That looks to me like a problem with the make you're using. OpenBSD's default make is BSD make and it's not compatible with CMake (or GNU make for that matter). Looking at the PolarSSL source code, I can see the following: There are currently three active build systems within the mbed TLS releases: Make CMake Microsoft Visual Studio (Visual ...


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You have the commands, so put them in a script! To run a bunch of commands on different data, put the changing data in a variable. To run gcov and mv on all the files, there are several possible methods, including: Run gcov on all files, then move them. Run gcov on one file, then move its output. Run gconv on the files in a directory, then move them. ...


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From the Boost 1.58 Release Notes: Compilers Tested Boost's primary test compilers are: Linux: Clang: 3.4 Clang, C++14: 3.5, 3.6 GCC: 4.4.7, 4.9.2 GCC, C++98: 4.8.1, 4.8.2 GCC, C++11: 4.4.7, 4.8.4, 4.9.2 GCC, C++14: 4.9.2 Windows: GCC, mingw: 4.4.7, 4.5.4, 4.6.3, 4.7.3, 4.8.2 Visual C++: 8.0, 9.0, 10.0, 11.0, ...


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I have the same problem and it seems the most upvoted answer didn't work for me. I am using Fedora 22 Workstation. Here is what I did to fix this: 1. Install libevent-devel package. 2. Install ncurses-devel package $ dnf install libevent-devel` $ dnf install ncurses-devel First one will solve no event.h problem and second will solve cannot find curses ...


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Defconfig generates a new kernel configuration with the default answer being used for all options. The default values are taken from a file located in the arch/$ARCH/configs/armada_370_v7up_defconfig file. These default configurations are not designed to exactly fit your target but are rather meant to be a superset so you only have to modify them a bit. ...


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On AIX you can have 3 compilers: GCC newer XL C/C++ Enterprise Edition older VisualAge C++ Professional For GCC since late 2.x, syntax for creating shared libraries is: gcc -shared -Wl,-soname,your_soname -o library_name file_list library_list Example: gcc -fPIC -g -c -Wall a.c gcc -fPIC -g -c -Wall b.c gcc -shared -Wl,-soname,libmystuff.so.1 -o ...


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I tried to comment out the -march=armv5 option in the "arch/arm/Makefile" arch-$(CONFIG_CPU_V7) =$(call cc-option, -march=armv7-a, -march=armv5) But with this I was getting unsupported commands error used as memory barriers written in armv5 assembly. Most likely these commands (mcr) written in lib/asm_offset.c need to be re-written in armv7 ...


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The libraries being linked to should be specified after there is a reference to them. Thus, you will change the command to: gcc -g -O2 -fopenmp -L/usr/lib -o lenstool_tab e_nfwg.o lenstool_tab.o midpnt.o nrutil.o polint.o qromo.o read_bin.o lenstool_tab.o -lcfitsio -lm This should fix your problem. You can possibly fix the problem in your Makefile so ...


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Don't take ownership of /usr/local. Use sudo to install software. But use your own account to build it. git clone … # or tar -x or … cd … ./configure make sudo make install Why not take ownership of /usr/local? You nailed it. That would allow any program running on your account to write there. Against a malicious program, you've lost anyway — infecting ...


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Most build systems honor --prefix=$path where /usr/local is usually the default. So normally you build + test + install, where the build + test step can occur anywhere you have write permission + the install step is usually... sudo make install (installs into --prefix) One way to setup your build environment is to have a build directory with a work + ...


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Approaches There are 2 approaches to this solution. /usr/local/{src,bin} is for custom built software installed by the System Admin, ie, root, in which case sudo or su - should always be used, making this question a moot point. Install pre-compiled binary updates, i.e those found in your distributions package management mechanism, but unsupported versions ...


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Run apt-get build-dep btrfs-tools to get all the build-dependencies including libblkid-dev.


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If there are missing packages, you can use apt-cache % apt-cache search blkid libblkid-dev - block device id library - headers and static libraries libblkid1 - block device id library or even % apt-cache search blkid | grep '\-dev' libblkid-dev - block device id library - headers and static libraries We know, that we need the development libraries to ...


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When you're building a binary from source that links to a particular library, the build process requires a few extra ("header") files related to that library that aren't needed during runtime, so they are not installed along with the base library package (since other distro packages which need the library itself are already built binaries). On Debian, the ...


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make is successful when #endif is moved from line 526 of Modules/posixmodule.c to line 513.


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To install the build-dependencies: apt-get build-dep freedink That will ensure all the files required to build Freedink are available, but with SDL 1.2 only. To use SDL2: apt-get install libsdl2-dev libsdl2-image-dev libsdl-ttf2.0-dev libsdl2-mixer-dev If you just want to be able to play Freedink, it's in Debian already: apt-get install freedink If ...


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There are performance benefits but they are small enough that you won't notice them unless you benchmark them against each other. And like yeti wrote, there are lot more variables that affect the speed. In general, it's not worth building custom versions of single libraries if you are on binary distribution because the onus of keeping that one library up to ...


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There is no short and easy answer. 1. There are lot of parameters like code cache/pipeline size, difference beween cache speed and main memory speed, code size with "-Os" vs "-O2", "-O3", code size using some generic "march=X/mtune=Y" settings vs "=native". When more code fits into the cache, this performance gain might outperform some other ...


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The -march=native and -mtune=native options will ensure generated binaries best utilize the available processor feature sets and scheduling. Any gain in performance will relate to how much of the application code may be optimized by using the additional processor feature sets. (YMMV). Optimized libraries and binaries should run faster in comparison with ...


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As there isn't a provided backport of OpenSSL 1.x for Debian 6.0, if you're unable to upgrade to a newer Debian release the best option is to create your own backport. As has been suggested, installing from source is not recommended. If you start with the source package for Debian 8.0 (jessie) it should be reasonably straightforward. This post on Stack ...


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ad 1. and 2. The kernel image is called vmlinux, that's right, but that's not what you actually need when you want to build external modules. It's the configuration and header files from this kernel that is needed. ad 3. To build modules, internal or external, you need support for loadable modules in this kernel, you want to build the module for, of course, ...


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Set rpath to $ORIGIN/libs and set soname to libsharedobject rather than libs/libsharedobject. My makefile is as follows. all: my_program libs/libmysharedobject.so: Makefile success.c gcc -fPIC -shared -Wl,-soname,libmysharedobject.so \ -o libs/libmysharedobject.so success.c my_program: Makefile libs/libmysharedobject.so gcc -o my_program main.c ...


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According to GMP documentation https://gmplib.org/manual/Build-Options.html you should use those options: When cross-compiling, the system used for compiling is given by ‘--build’ and the system where the library will run is given by ‘--host’. For example when using a FreeBSD Athlon system to build GNU/Linux m68k binaries, ./configure ...



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