Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If you cancel portage and later rerun the same command the specified package will compile again. So if you e.g. start to run emerge www-client/firefox, cancel it and rerun the command again, merging www-client/firefox will start from scratch. Note that the dependency list is generated when starting emerge, so when you missed some dependency in the first run ...


1

You'll have a hard time building such an old version of gcc on a modern system... The errors you've copied are from texinfo, which is no longer compatible with the documentation included in gcc 2.95. You can try installing binaries straight from http://snapshot.debian.org/package/gcc-2.95/2.95.4.ds15-27/; installing cpp-2.95 and gcc-2.95 from there will ...


0

/etc/rc.d/rc.local Take a look at the rc.local file on your system, whatever you put in there will be run whenever your system boots. You could also set a cron job, based on knowing in advance when the system will reboot, which could remove your command from rc.local once the machine is done booting. You can also put whatever you want in an init script in ...


0

You will need to compile the older version of gcc from source and give it a different destination directory with the prefix option. ./configure --prefix=/usr/local/gcc I think the gcc configure will allow you to use your existing /etc. ./configure --prefix=/usr/local/gcc --sysconfdir=/etc


0

As mentioned by @Lai , anything that is not distribution tuned may not work in subtle ways. But if you just want to play around without much thought, on 4.0 you might get away with: make defconfig which detects your architecture and uses for example arch/x86/configs/x86_64_defconfig as a basis. make help also shows other interesting default related ...


1

As caribou is in the repositories, you can just run sudo apt-get build-dep caribou to install all dependencies.


2

The dependencies are expressed not as package names, but as pkg-config dependencies. I think that on RPM-based systems you can search for these directly, but on Debian-based systems you need to search for the corresponding files. To do that, the easiest approach is to install apt-file, update its indices with sudo apt-file update then you can use ...


1

First install XZ yum -y install xz then tar -xvf yourfile.tar.xz


1

Should work with the following command: tar -xvfz linux-2.6.32.65.tar.xz


1

There is something wrong with your mirrorlist. The fact that you got a 404 must mean that your internet connection is fine (assuming your DNS is configured correctly) GCC comes from the base repo, so check the contents of /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-Base.repo and look at the [base] entry. For example on my CentOS 6.6 system I have: [base] ...


1

open your terminal and type as sudo apt-get autoclean sudo apt-get autoremove sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo apt-get autoclean clears out the local repository of retrieved package files in the /var/cache/apt/archives. The difference is that it only removes package filesthat can no longer be downloaded, and are largely useless. sudo ...


1

At least some of your gcc packages are manually installed and correspond to a version which is newer than those in Ubuntu 14.04. To install g++-multilib and its dependencies you'll need to downgrade those packages to the versions in the archives. Start by running sudo apt-get install gcc-4.9-base=4.9-20140406-0ubuntu1 and work your way up from there... ...


2

It should be fine; it might leave the tests and test components in an indeterminate state, but the actual application shouldn't be affected. That's not a hard and fast rule and I'm not familiar with guile but it would be pretty weird if the build depended on completing make check, or if the check could potentially damage something. However, if by "taking a ...


0

I would like to add to foo's comment above, and my reputation is too low to add a comment: It is helpful to add './' to the s:gradlew variable, i.e.: let s:gradlew = escape('./' . findfile('gradlew', '.;') . " -b " . findfile('build.gradle', '.;'), ' \') This will allow gradlew to execute even when the file is in the current working directory. Without ...


0

To remove the extension use something like this- echo $GEDIT_CURRENT_DOCUMENT_NAME | sed 's/\..*$//'


0

Remove extension: Try to use the ${varname%.ext} expansion of sh/bash/zsh. For example like this: #!/bin/sh # ... file_name_with_out_ext="${GEDIT_CURRENT_DOCUMENT_NAME%.c}" (but beware that this will only remove .c extionsions and leave .h or .cpp, or any other extensions alone) Test if file exists: You can test if a file exists (for example a ...


0

Well, I'm silly. It was indeed the --static option in my linking command. In lieu of the static libraries, I got rid of the --static, worked through some errors related to the code, and it compiles correctly. Thanks for the responses.


1

Either in the order listed in the X.Org build.sh script or by figuring out the dependency tree in the X.Org jhbuild modules file. Note that X11R7.7 is nearly three years old now, and many of the modules have had newer versions, with security fixes, released since then, in the X.Org individual releases archive.



Top 50 recent answers are included