New answers tagged

1

It turns out I used the wrong zimg. The correct zimg is sekrit-twc/zimg.


0

Install the package libjson-glib-dev. It and its dependencies contain the files you need. json-glib/json-glib.h is under /usr/include/json-glib-1.0. so the symbolic link you created is not useful. Remove it (it may confuse configure scripts). To get the compiler to search for header files under /usr/include/json-glib-1.0, you need to pass the option -I /usr/...


0

This Q appears to have been answered in the comments. Per njsg's comment, LIBRARY_PATH is what you're looking for "The value of LIBRARY_PATH is a colon-separated list of directories, [...] Linking using GCC also uses these directories when searching for ordinary libraries for the -l option (but directories specified with -L come first)."


3

When configuring a system against your own custom kernel, I would suggest adding a name to the current version in your modified kernel sources. For instance, in Armbian they create their own kernel packages, and add a -sunxi to kernel.release. Takin as an example modifying the 4.6.3 kernel version: root@ruir:/usr/src/linux-headers-4.6.3-sunxi# grep -ri 4....


1

I'm not a Rasbian user, but I'm assuming that you've just installed the JSON GLib libraries. You also need the header files. These are available in the json-glib-dev package. As a general piece of advice: If you find yourself moving things (libraries, binaries) around as root, or creating symlinks here and there, then it is highly likely that you're ...


0

This solution worked for me. The procedure I followed was: I followed the steps for my distribution (Debian Jessie) from here. I saved de driver for Linux of the manufacturer (which comes with the equipment in the CDROM), and I unzipped it to a folder. In the folder, I typed make (as root), and I got an error. So, I did the modification above, and it ...


0

As noted in the comments below my question the answer is: No, linkers are too smart nowadays, the problem has to be something else.


0

You probably wanted to take patch-4.4.12-rt20.patch.xz, not patches-4.4.12-rt20.tar.xz. As the extension hints, the latter is a tar archive, not a single patch file. Apparently it contains the same patches as the single-file version, but with commit messages etc. patch is smart enough to ignore useless stuff (like the tar file structure, apparently), so ...


1

As there is a /usr/include/freetype2/config/ftheader.h in freetype-devel, and assuming that a file called ft2build.h actually means freetype2 by "freetype", you could try creating a symbolic link ln -s /usr/include/freetype2 /usr/include/freetype. But you should ask, where did the "ft2build.h" file come from? Does it have any #ifdef around the #include ...


0

You need to have /usr/include/freetype2 in your "include path". This may be done by passing -I/usr/include/freetype2 during compile time, or there may be an option to the DWM configure script.


11

To install to a custom directory, use this: ./configure --prefix=/desired/path make sudo make install By default, programs installed without the added prefix will be located in /usr/local/bin. To verify this, you can type which program_name after installation. If you install your program in a custom directory, it will be installed in /desired/path/bin. ...


2

One way to do this is to use xargs, which turns whitespace-separated strings on stdin into command-line arguments. If your file is called switches, this would look like: xargs ./configure < switches This will not expand things like * or $VAR. If (as in your edit) you want these to be expanded, then there are a few approaches. We can simply create a ...


2

To expand $HOME in your file you could use envsubst first (be aware this will expand any env variable). Then you could read the result into an array e.g. with zsh args=(${(f)"$(< <(envsubst <infile))"}) or with bash readarray -t args < <(envsubst <infile) and then run ./configure "${args[@]}" Alternatively, you could use tr to ...


2

distcc can be used to compile code on multiple machines. From the debian distcc package info: Package: distcc Description-en: simple distributed compiler client and server distcc is a program to distribute compilation of C or C++ code across several machines on a network. distcc should always generate the same results as a local compile, is ...


0

You could try making a Beowulf Cluster. You set up one host as a master and the rest as nodes. It's been done in the past by others, including NASA as the wikipedia entry on Beowulf Cluster says. Building your own cluster computer farm might cost more in power than you'd gain in compute resources. I have not tried this myself, but I've always wanted to ...


2

I ran into this several years ago on a Debian build. In the .config file you copied from /boot find and comment out the lines CONFIG_SYSTEM_TRUSTED_KEY and CONFIG_MODULE_SIG_KEY. During the build you can use your own cert or just use a random one time cert. Found the above in this thread.


0

A google for 64 bit hla finds for example this forum article which says you can pass an option to the loader to do a 32 bit version with: hla -lmelf_i386 -v helloWorld There's more discussion in this blog. You may need to install a 32 package like glibc.i686.


0

I know it's a 2 years old problem and you probably got up with your life but while hitting the same problem I found out that the below helped: touch xmldocs.make hope someone someday will find it helpful :-)


0

/edit: Corrected my post: Try adding --us --uc to your make-kpkg call, like the manual mentions, "this option is passed to dpkg-buildpackage". -us and -us mean that you don't want any signing.


0

I'm answering my own question since it hasn't gotten any answer and the solution suggested on the comments worked like a charm. I solved this by enabling CONFIG_NUMA in my kernel configuration and rebuilding it. After booting my new kernel I could enable sysctl vm.zone_reclaim_mode=1 without a hitch.


0

Nope, the --enable-modules option exist for the purpose of being able to set --enable-module=none. The specific autoconf behaviour is in acinclude.m4. AC_ARG_ENABLE(modules, APACHE_HELP_STRING(--enable-modules=MODULE-LIST,Space-separated list of modules to enable | "all" | "most" | "few" | "none" | "reallyall"),[ if test "$enableval" = "none"; then ...


0

Here from the documentation https://httpd.apache.org/docs/trunk/programs/configure.html --enable-modules=MODULE-LIST This option behaves like to --enable-mods-shared, and will also link the given modules dynamically. The special keyword none disables the build of all modules. I hope this clarifies that they are linked dynamically.


0

I wrote a helper to easily generate EDID binary files, with proper checksum, from Xorg modeline format: https://github.com/akatrevorjay/edid-generator You can use this to easily generate yourself some fresh bins. I use it to get 60hz on my monitor as well as deal with Apple's Thunderbolt display's EDID woes. There are instructions for using it on that ...



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