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4

You can use the make targets delete-old and delete-old-libs to remove obsolete files. They run interactively, unless you set BATCH_DELETE_OLD_FILES: # pwd /usr/src # make -DBATCH_DELETE_OLD_FILES delete-old Run them after make installworld. Have a look at build(7) for more details. A word of warning - be careful with delete-old-libs - it will delete ...


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It's all about risk mitigation; if make does something destructive, you can only lose whatever data was modifiable (or deletable) by the user running it. So you run make as a plain user to limit the scope to that user's files, and you run make install as root because you have to if you want to install to /usr/local typically. Note that in the example you ...


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At the stage where you have a directory tree containing a file …/etc/shadow (before building the filesystem image), modify that file to inject the password hash(es) that you want to have. The easiest way to do that is with recent enough versions of the chpasswd tool from the Linux shadow utilities suite (Debian wheezy is recent enough) with the -R option. ...


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In general it should be possible, if both hosts really have the same specifications (i.e. same processor architecture, same libraries in same versions installed, same kernel installed, same file system structure for referred config files/libraries, ...). But since you can do nasty things in Makefiles there might be situations where this is not possible. The ...


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I thought I would add a better answer for anyone else observing this thread. So, if you've already gone through the trouble of building opencv on the device, you've probably followed the instructions here: http://docs.opencv.org/doc/tutorials/introduction/linux_install/linux_install.html In which case, if you don't add the -D args to dynamically override ...


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It comes down to trust vs convenience. True, make might be insecure, but then so might make install. It's just that the surface attack area should (hopefully) be smaller for make install, and it's more likely a quick perusal of the Makefile will spot anything strange. However, installing software into the $PATH is risky regardless of who has compiled it, so ...


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For compiling kernel module you should create Makefile and to include kernel module makefile /usr/src/share/mk/bsd.kmod.mk for example: # Note: It is important to make sure you include the <bsd.kmod.mk> makefile after declaring the KMOD and SRCS variables. # Declare Name of kernel module KMOD = module # Enumerate Source files for kernel module ...


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If these are external modules, try building against the kernel first, then install using modules_install as described below. Make sure you are building in the path to your kernel source. From https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/kbuild/modules.txt --- 2.1 Command Syntax The command to build an external module is: $ make -C ...


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There isn't anywhere special the source code needs to be. Normally it'd be wherever your repository is. If you want to leave it somewhere for the next admin to find, the most obvious place would be a company VCS server. /usr/src would also be a reasonable place to look, as well as $HOME. Eventually, if you decide to submit the module for inclusion in the ...


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What is your distribution? Does your distribution have rtmpdump available as a binary package? Debian does, for example, and therefore Ubuntu and Mint should as well, for example. If so, why aren't you using it? In any case, apt-file search librtmp.so librtmp-dev: /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/librtmp.so librtmp0: /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/librtmp.so.0 ...



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