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24

All software are programs, which are also called source packages. So all source packages need to be built first, to run on your system. The binary packages are one that are already build from source by someone with general features and parameters provided in the software so that a large number of users can install and use it. Binary packages are easy to ...


21

A source file contains the original code as written by the developer in whatever language he/she chooses (C, C++, Python etc),and is generic. It isn't specific to any distro and in many cases to any operating system. A package (RPM or DEB for example) is the binary executable (or interpreted script etc) pre-prepared for your particular distro. The task of ...


11

Apart from the other answers, I would like to add something: If you decide to compile a program by yourself, you need to think that compiling is not something you do only once. You will probably need to subscribe to the development mailing list of the applications you decided to compile and stay up to date with the new versions and, especially, the security ...


4

Building from the source allows to specify architecture of exactly your machine. New CPUs have additional instructions that compilers do understand, squeezing out a little bit of performance. Pre-build packages usually count on the most archaic CPU still in common use. This is mostly important for project-critical applications that use CPU very heavily, ...


4

The first syntax is correct. ./configure CFLAGS="-I/usr/local/include" LDFLAGS="-L/usr/local/lib" However, it is strongly recommended to either use binary packages(7) or, if for whatever reason you absolutely need to build from source, make use of the ports(7) infrastructure, as explained by the FAQ section 15. Set up the ports tree as detailed in the ...


2

My recommendation is that you don't do this and instead use a precompiled version. However, if that's not good enough: Is it right to run the ./configure on the raspberry? Yes. Then copy the node folder to my desktop computer and run make. No. The build must be done natively on the pi, or else with the use of a cross compiler. In the former ...


2

The correct way is: ./configure CFLAGS="-I/usr/local/include" LDFLAGS="-L/usr/local/lib" but this may not work with all configure scripts. It's probably better to set environment variables such as CPATH and LIBRARY_PATH (see gcc man page). An example: export CPATH=/usr/local/include export LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/local/lib export ...


1

I found the answer after having a second look at the pkg-config manual, and better understanding the purpose of those environment variables. I also noticed I could do a Google search for pidgin pkg-config. I was then able to find the solution. This allows configure to find the required libraries with pkg-config... $ ...



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