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10

CUPS understands many different types of files directly, including text, PostScript, PDF, and image files. This allows you to print from inside your applications or at the command-line, whichever is most convenient! Type either of the following commands to print a file to the default (or only) printer on the system: lp filename lpr filename Use the -d ...


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The skype.desktop files are not meant for you to run. To invoke skype you should be able to simply type skype in your terminal or run it via the full path here: $ /usr/bin/skype Files that end in a .desktop are configuration files for your desktop, not for you to execute directly. See here for example: $ more /usr/share/applications/skype.desktop ...


4

From what I understand, setting proxies system-wide via that GUI does three things: Set the corresponding values in the dconf database. Set the values in /etc/environment. Set the values in /etc/apt/apt.conf. 1 and 3 take effect immediately. /etc/environment is parsed on login, so you will need to logout and login for that to take effect. (Note that this ...


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Last time I was using such a system, I used to prefer enscript. It's been a while but I seem to recall it being a more sophisticated version of lpr which could do everything that lpr did and then some. It works like so: enscript foo.file It can either print directly to a printer or convert text to postscript. It should be available in the repositories of ...


2

To be able to disable history expansion on a particular command line, you can use space as the 3rd character of $histchars: histchars='!^ ' Then, if you enter your command with a leading space, history expansion will not be performed. bash-4.3$ echo "#!/bin/bash" bash: !/bin/bash: event not found bash-4.3$ echo "#!/bin/bash" #!/bin/bash Note however ...


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I use bash, and on tab, the file name completion happens as well. But for the specific example that you have taken - of long file names, if you have many files with the same prefix in the directory, many tabs would be needed to get to the file! I faced a similar problem with one codebase which I was working with, and the workaround I created for myself ...


1

When using Bash and its ability to perform completion via the Tab key, there are 2 aspects to the completion that might be getting confused. When you type a letter at the prompt and start hitting Tab, you'll notice the behavior you're describing. Example $ elTab el4-rpmlint el5-rpmlint elbadmin elfedit elif elinks else This is ...



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