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0

Maybe a simple: $ ls --color=always | od -cAn will be enough.


3

For ls you can do export CLICOLOR_FORCE=X ls -G | cat -vet


4

Use script /tmp/output to start recording in a new shell, then type your commands and look in the /tmp/output file, e.g. with an editor or cat -vet. Type exit to the shell to exit the recording.


3

Probably best to run the output through a hex viewer (e.g. od, hexdump, xxd): % man less | hexdump -C | head -5 00000000 4c 45 53 53 28 31 29 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 |LESS(1) | 00000010 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 | | * 00000040 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 4c 45 53 53 28 31 29 0a 0a | LESS(1)..| 00000050 ...


4

Most core utilities behave differently when they output to an interactive terminal. If they detect you are outputting into a file or a pipe, they don't format (reasonably so: we don't want color escape sequences when we are processing file lists with a script). For ls, you can force it: CLICOLOR_FORCE=1 ls -G (That's for OSX; on Linux, that would be ls ...


0

First, you need to understand the difference between desktop environment and distribution. Distributions like Ubuntu, CentOS, Fedora, Gentoo, etc. are just "sets of packages" that have a few "tweaks" to make them more desirable. Really when your talking about "Look and feel" and "distro" you generally only talkin about themes and color choices. What makes ...


0

You can use tmux -2 to solve this issue.


0

A simple but very flexible tool for coloring ANY terminal text is 'colout'. pip install colout myprocess | colout REGEX_WITH_GROUPS color1,color2... Where any text in the output of 'myprocess' which matches group 1 of the regex will be colored with color1, group 2 with color2, etc. For example: tail -f /var/log/mylogfile | colout '^(\w+ \d+ ...


0

Publishes some time ago Node Js utility - log-color-highlight tail -f file | lch -red error warn -green success lch -f file -red.bold error warn -underline.bgGreen success


4

Due to the fact that "etc/motd" is a plain text file, commands are not executed, but instead printed as so: #!/bin/bash echo "$(tput setaf 2) .~~. .~~. '. \ ' ' / .'$(tput setaf 1) .~ .~~~..~. : .~.'~'.~. : ~ ( ) ( ) ~ ( : '~'.~.'~' : ) ~ .~ ( ) ~. ~ ( : '~' : ) $(tput sgr0)Raspberry Pi$(tput setaf 1) '~ .~~~. ~' '~' $(tput ...


0

After adding the line below into .tmux.conf set -g default-terminal "screen-256color" You still need to add the line below into .vimrc set term=screen-256color Finally, the alias need to be added to .bashrc alias tmux='tmux -2'


0

The program is buggy as it pads the numbers with spaces to 3 characters. E.g. prints "[[48;5; 42m (with space) which doesn't work instead of ^[[48;5;42m (without space) which would work.


2

The effect you are seeing isn't a terminal window graphical trick, it is gui emacs running in X. You correctly identify the customization to get emacs to draw that, but these are only rendered when emacs is run in X. To illustrate, I have my mode-line themed with: '(mode-line ((t (:background "gray10" :foreground "green" :box (:line-width -1 :style ...


0

Although this is not exactly what you asked for, I decided to post this answer because originally I had the same idea as you, but in the end I solve it like this and I find it even better than coloring. One can set this option for GNU readline library: completion-prefix-display-length The length in characters of the common prefix of a list of possible ...


2

The way I understand this Wikipedia Page (though I would very much like to be proven wrong on this specific issue): Style Underline exists, not limited to cursor. They call it code 4. Style Framed exists, as in 4 borders around each character, they call it code 51. Note: That does not enable framing a string of characters without borders between the ...


0

To Turn Off the color: unalias ls To Turn On the color: alias ls='ls --color=auto' To Temporarily disable the color: \ls -ltr



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