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I'm impressed about how richfully formatted and detailed the answers (and the question!) are. While they provide valuable info and solutions about the tools you mentioned, they provide very little insight about what the heck is going on, and, most importantly, why things are (somewhat) working for some tools when they supposedly should not. So here's some ...


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If you're refering to the output of ls, its manpage sent me to the LS_COLORS environment variable and the dircolors helper program that can turn a list of specifications (extensions and the like, including special values like LINK and DIR) into the LS_COLORS you want. dircolors --print-database will give you commented default settings.


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This is just a followup of @user17591 solution -- vim scripting: #!/usr/bin/vim -ns :%s%^+ %+++ :%s%^- %--- :%s%^ % :set nu :let html_use_css=1 :so $VIMRUNTIME/syntax/2html.vim :wq :qa! chmod it and Usage: htmlvim file (to produce file.html)


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For those who have a command that is written on the assumption that piped output will never have color (e.g. some testing frameworks) you may find it useful to use the script utility to first save the ansi output. This can then be pushed to aha or the other utilities mentioned.


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I solved the problem by running scriptreplay in a screen and the dumping the scrollback buffer to a file. The following expect script does this for you. It has been tested for logfiles with up to 250.000 lines. In the working directory you need your scriptlog, a file called "time" with 10.000.000 times the line "1 10" in it, and the script. I needs the ...


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I've honed my .bashrc over the years to work on both OSX and Ubuntu. I've also reduced it in size to 28 lines with compact condition statements. With it, my PS1 prompt looks like: with time in red, username in green, machine name in light blue, pwd in darker blue and git branch in yellow. Feature of my PS1 prompt: shows git branch! long directory paths ...


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Colors for man pages (via ArchWiki): function _colorman() { env \ LESS_TERMCAP_mb=$(printf "\e[1;35m") \ LESS_TERMCAP_md=$(printf "\e[1;34m") \ LESS_TERMCAP_me=$(printf "\e[0m") \ LESS_TERMCAP_se=$(printf "\e[0m") \ LESS_TERMCAP_so=$(printf "\e[7;40m") \ LESS_TERMCAP_ue=$(printf "\e[0m") \ LESS_TERMCAP_us=$(printf "\e[1;33m") \ ...


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I found a solution. There are two parameters that can be used (added to the ~/.Xresources file): URxvt*highlightColor: #000000 URxvt*highlightTextColor: #D75F00 Here's the explanation: highlightColor: colour If set, use the specified colour as the background for highlighted characters. If unset, use reverse video. ...


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Both Meta-> and Meta-< work perfectly fine for me. I'm used to them because they do the same in emacs


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In general, obtaining the current colours is impossible. The control sequence processing of a terminal happens "inside" the terminal, wherever that happens to be. With a terminal emulator such as xterm or the one built into an operating system kernel that provides the kernel virtual terminals, the internal state of the emulator, including its notion of the ...



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