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You can find out which colorschemes are installed (and try them out) via :colorscheme <Tab> (or <C-D>). If you've found a nice one, just :edit ~/.vimrc and put the corresponding command in there. Some colorschemes look better if you have a high-color terminal. You can find out the number of available colors via :set t_Co?; you can also try ...


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Yes, finally found my mistake. It seems like you need to install the package rxvt-unicode-256color to get 256 color support. sudo apt-get install rxvt-unicode-256color is the answer to my problems.


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I had the same question, terdon's answer is nice but I think there is a confusion between dirname and dircolors ? Anyway, after some further research I could change the colors, so I'm sharing my solution here. It may be useful for someone some day ! So, 3 simple steps: First, as terdon said, copy the default colors to a file dircolors -p > ...


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Try copying /usr/share/terminfo/r/rxvt-256color to ~/.terminfo/r/rxvt-256color And in your vimrc add set t_Co=256 Also add set -g default-terminal "screen-256color" In your tmux, screen conf if used. Oh and check out CSApprox vim plugin when you get the full color support it makes many themes look great in terminals. Also try this script in vim to ...


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Replace --color with -G when running ls.


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The 8 standard colors numbered 1 through 8 officially contains primary and secondary colors (black, red, green, yellow, blue, magenta, cyan, white), but there is considerable variation: many terminals don't show primary colors, but instead show variants thereof. Yours shows the following RGB values: 383a3a ff3950 00b226 c56227 022bab fd16de 00b5ae aeb2b3 ...


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To troubleshoot this, if you're using X11/Xorg, I would start by requesting xrdb: xrdb -query It will display all non-default values. ~/.Xresources or ~/.Xdefaults files can customize your terminal colors. It can be customized in a specific application file in /usr/share/X11/app-defaults/ directory as well. For instance, on my box where I have my own ...


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The colours are set by ls, using the LS_COLORS environment variable. To change the colours, you can use dircolors. dircolors --print-database outputs the current source settings, which you can store in a file and adapt; then dircolors ${file} will output the processed LS_COLORS value for you using the settings in ${file}. Strictly speaking ls outputs ...



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