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2

To set up networking for your chrooted session you need to copy the DNS configuration into the chroot environment : cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/etc/resolv.conf Or ln -s /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/etc/resolv.conf


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To properly secure ssh access, you must not allow authentication free login. Set up an RSA key for authentication, and then the client can use that instead of needing a password.


2

You need to tell PAM also that you want to allow empty passwords. There is some outdated tutorial describing that. But in short: sudo sed -i 's/nullok_secure/nullok/' /etc/pam.d/common-auth should do the job.


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I was possible with overlayfs: mount -t overlay -o "lowerdir=/original,upperdir=/overlay,workdir=/tmp/workdir" overlay /mnt/target Where /original is untouched, /overlay is the result of changes on /mnt/target over /original, thus /mnt/target is the result of files in /original plus files in /overlay. The /tmp/work is a control directory, it is necessary ...


2

No. internal-sftp is evaluated inside of sshd server. If you use wrapper script as ForceCommand already, you can't go back. Even if you could, in chroot you don't have the sshd binary either. Unfortunately, ForceCommand different from internal-sftp blocks even the sftp subsystem (subsystem is internally handled as a command). Only way to do that is to copy ...


1

Yes, you can do the trick using Btrfs subvolumes. First you need to convert ext4 to btrfs as described here. Convert your chroot to subvilume if it is not yet: sudo mv /path/to/chroot /path/to/chroot-tmp sudo btrfs subvol create /path/to/chroot sudo mv /path/to/chroot-tmp/* /path/to/chroot sudo mv /path/to/chroot-tmp/* /path/to/chroot -r # for ...


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chroot doesn't change processes' personality by default, so within the chroot you still see the host's (kernel) architecture, x86_64. On the other hand you've set up your trusty_i386 schroot with a linux32 personality, so schroot runs that when setting the chroot up — and linux32 (which links to setarch) changes the current personality to report a 32-bit ...


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You can use systemd or create a bash file with your commands, like this: #!/bin/sh sudo MYAPPLICATION And add in first line of your ~/.bashrc file like this: source ~/.MYAPPLICATION.sh


3

One of the questions you ask is: "Is there a program that provides an x11 xserver inside a window?" It sounds like Xnest might answer that question. Xnest is "A nested X server that runs as an X application". I know that I've used it in the past to show me unusual window managers that I had compiled from source, and didn't want to have crash my whole ...



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