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Linux has a mechanism that allows plug-ins to be registered so that the kernel calls an interpreter program when instructed to execute a file: binfmt_misc. Simplifying a bit, when an executable file is executed, the kernel reads the first few bytes and goes like this: Does it start with the four bytes \x7fELF followed by a valid-looking ELF header? If so, ...


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Chroot is of no help here. It only affects file names, not networking and other features. Modern versions of Linux offer a way to virtualize certain aspects of the environment piecemeal, via namespaces. In addition to the traditional virtualization of filenames through chroot (so a chrooted process won't see files outside the chroot), you can virtualize ...


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Answer: as far as I can tell from fairly extensive Googling, lack of network namespacing in chroot does in fact make this impossible. You cannot assign a chroot environment its own IP, its own hostname or FQDN, or anything along those lines, by any means. Chroot is useful for securing single programs or daemons. For creating any kind of isolated test ...



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