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1

Fakechroot can be configured to exclude some paths, i.e. those paths will refer to the same location inside the (fake) chroot and outside. This is especially useful for directories like /dev and /proc which it is useful to have everywhere as a lot of programs depend on them. Excluded paths can be defined via: the FAKECHROOT_EXCLUDE_PATH environment ...


0

I have something similar setup and it works so you're configuration looks valid to me. I would suggest adding this line above the Match rule which will enable a bit more verbose messaging in your logs which might help you narrow focus on what the underlying issue is. Subsystem sftp internal-sftp -f AUTH -l INFO Be sure to restart sshd after the ...


3

Change the name of the executable (note that that also affects PAM configuration). ln /path/to/sshd /path/to/sshd-whatever Start as /path/to/sshd-whatever. And define PAM configuration in /etc/pam.d/sshd-whatever. Log entries will show as sshd-whatever instead of sshd.


0

On Unix based systems, services listening on privileged ports require the blessing of the system administrator. This indicates that the service is being run by a trusted (at least by the administrator) user. Users of such services can then trust there is some administrative oversight of the server application. The value of this trust may not be as great ...


1

There are several reasons to start a web server as root: to bind to port 80 (ports below 1024 are reserved to root, so that if a remote user is connecting to a service on a low port, they know that this service is approved by root); to set up confinement, e.g. chroot; to read and serve users' web pages, where applicable. That least reason is a poor ...


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Although POSIX has a standard for capabilities which I think includes CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE, these are not required for conformance and may in some ways be incompatible with the implementation on, e.g., linux. Since webservers like apache are not written for only one platform, using root privileges is the most portable method. I suppose it could do this ...


0

You can achieve it using the below command. Assuming the new user created is user1, you can give the below command to give access to this user access to the home directories of the other users. setfacl -R -m user:user1:rwx /home/ However, it is strongly not recommended. You can find this answer for my question here. We have implemented a similar ...


0

Have a look at your sshd_config. You might want to set up a sftp-internal chroot. /TFTPROOT would be your chroot-dir. This is more secure than tftp. Here is a good tutorial: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2012/03/chroot-sftp-setup/


-1

Using the useradd command with the –d option you can add a certain user (ex: ftpuser), as well as his home directory (/homedir) like below: useradd ftpuser -d /homedir passwd ftpuser You will be prompted to enter the new password: Changing password for user <username> New UNIX password: Retype new UNIX password: passwd: all authentication tokens ...



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