Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Ctrl+W is the shortcut to close the current document or tab in many applications. I don't know where it originated (at a guess, Mac), but it's become a standard in most major environments, including Gnome, KDE, OSX and Microsoft Office. Mnemonic: W is next to Q on QWERTY keyboards; Ctrl+Q is for quit, and Ctrl+W is for a lesser form of quitting. Some ...


1

It's application-dependent... I'm not sure one can say the majority has that shortcut, since it's unlikely one has used the majority of applications. As an example, xpdf uses Ctrl+W to close the current file. I'm haunted by the Ctrl+F, Ctrl+W, / for "search" confusion. I wish there was a de facto standard on *nix for that, and other things such as -r vs -R ...


1

There are some projects that you should investigate and that may meet your needs AppScale, source (Python, Java, PHP, Go) Cape Dwarf, source (Java only currently) There are a lot of options to deploy yourself and it's likely the virtual machine option is the most easy to get started. Since the source is there you should be relatively free to compile or ...


1

It's actually a default set by GTK2 (the widget toolkit used by Chromium, as well as many other programs). The default is determined in gtk/gtkpapersize.c, function gtk_paper_size_get_default. In order of preference, it gets its paper size from: nl_langinfo, on systems where that can return paper size. AFAIK, Linux/glibc is not one of those, so this step ...


1

I think Chromium sets the default paper size based on your current locale settings. If you start it from terminal with some euro LC_PAPER setting, e.g. LC_PAPER=fr_FR.utf8 chromium or LC_PAPER=en_GB.utf8 chromium it should default to A4 when Printing to File.



Top 50 recent answers are included