New answers tagged

0

This troubleshooting guide suggests it's either metadata cache corruption or genuinely broken package (missing 'provides: libX11.so.6()(64bit)').


0

The directories containing system libraries should to be referenced in /etc/ld.so.conf. (If you change those then call ldconfig to update the corresponding binary database.) When you have per-application libraries stored elsewhere you need to set LD_LIBRARY_PATH to one or more colon-separated directories containing these user libraries. export ...


0

This comment is added on May 18, 2016. There are news that Google will end support for flash at the end of year 2016. They are also removing the support for NPAPI plugins. If you are using flash to view video, most browser now support html5 based video player. References. Chrome support for NPAPI plugins no longer available Google to phases out support ...


4

The reason it doesn't run is because .exe files are designed for Windows, and won't run on Ubuntu without using Wine or a VM. So you downloaded the wrong file. You need to get the Linux version. You're looking for the file that ends with .deb. Here is a link to the file you need: Please note that this will only work if you have a 64-bit version of Ubuntu, ...


11

Clarification : This .exe file you downloaded is an installation file for Windows operating systems. You can install Google Chrome in Ubuntu this way, open a terminal and execute these commands: echo "deb http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list wget -q -O - ...


4

You can go on the Google website and download the .deb package from this url : https://www.google.fr/chrome/browser/desktop/index.html The google website will auto-detect you're operating system here GNU/Linux, if not click on other platform and select "Linux" if will give you two options an RPM and a DEB package, as you run Ubuntu, you will choose the "64 ...


6

Because chrome is not open source. Ubuntu (as most other Linux distributions) come with chromium instead, which is the open source project that chrome is based on. Because chrome isn't open and re-distributable, it can include some things that aren't really free but typically aren't hard to get (if you want them), I've read that in ubuntu (I use Debian) you ...


0

No. [dm-devel] [PATCH v5 0/3] init: add support to directly boot to a mapped device


4

Google Chrome is no longer supported on 32-bit Linux or any architecture of Ubuntu 12.04/Debian 7. You can install it, but it is not a good idea. It gets no security updates, and is currently vulnerable to many security bugs. You also don't get any new features. There are a few things you can do, though. If you really want to use Google Chrome, it may ...


0

Google discontinued 32-bit builds. Given that Chrome is closed-source, there can't be any unofficial builds. However, Chromium, the core of Google Chrome, is open-source and will keep supporting i386 (as per link above). It's available in Xenial under the name of "chromium-browser".


-1

Install Google Chrome 48.0.2564.116 on Linux Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus (LTS) Open a new Terminal window and type in the following commands: Download For Ubuntu 32 bit: wget https://dl.google.com/linux/direct/google-chrome-stable_current_i386.deb Install: sudo dpkg -i --force-depends google-chrome-stable_current_i386.deb In addition, if you find ...


1

If you want to execute something from your current location, you need to write ./ before the command. In your case ./chrome Calling chrome directly would only work if the current directory is in the PATH environment variable.



Top 50 recent answers are included