New answers tagged

1

Yes, doing it as the root user would allow you to change the permissions on (and owner of) these files and directories. $ cd /backup/dir/somewhere $ sudo chown myname:mygroup myfile $ sudo chmod u+rw myfile ... where myname and mygroup is your username and default group (check you other files in your home directory or use id -n -u (for username) and id -n ...


0

You need to become root (using su or sudo) as only the owner of a file can change its permissions.


1

Try, chown manuel:manuel /home/manuel/subdir/ above command will give your account ownership over the folder subdir, if there's more directories owned by root under subdir (you can check with ls -Rl /home/manuel/subdir/) you could add the recursive option -R to the earlier chown command like this chown -R manuel:manuel /home/manuel/subdir/. That'll make ...


1

To add rw permissions use: chmod o+rw <filemame> To remove w for other: chmod o-w <filename> Likewise for group: chmod g+rw <filename> And for owner: chmod u+rw <filename>


2

chmod o+rw yourfile For other add (+) read and write permissions. I think it's quite semantically meaningful. Alternatively, you could learn the numeric notation. R is worth 4, W is worth 2 and X is worth 1. If you want read and write, for example, you add 4 and 2 together giving 6. So to keep the permissions the same for owner (6) and group (4) you ...


0

Have you tried chkperm utility? https://gitlab.com/chkperm/chkperm/wikis/home I think you can use it on fresh linux installation to get the correct permission, then boot your server into recovery mode and use chkperm to fix these permissions to the original state.


5

As root chmod 755 / restores that to the default permissions. If you'd done chmod -R 664 / then you'd have to reinstall.



Top 50 recent answers are included