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Your listing shows a + on files where you did not run getfacl, so it is hard to tell ehat really happened. Repeat with a single file and list/report state before and after and all commands. If your promblem stays on files that did not have acls before, there is a bug in your acl implementation as I cannot repeat the problem on the reference Solaris where ...


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It's history time, kids! Stevens, "APUE", chapter 4, section 10 quotes thusly: "The S_ISVTX bit has an interesting history ... if it was set ... a copy of the program's text was saved in the swap area ... this caused the program to load into memory faster the next time ... later versions of Unix referred to this as the saved-text bit, hence the constant ...


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The issue turned out to be neither a PATH nor a permissions problem. Anaconda Python was installed in my /root directory, which meant that it could only be accessed by a superuser. Reinstalling Anaconda in home solved the problem.


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This looks like it has nothing to do with permissions. You'd see a "permission denied", not a "command not found". What's going on is that you seem to have . in your $PATH as root (which is insane), but not for your own account. Is it safe to add . to my PATH? How come? Answer: no. You unpack a tar.gz, cd into the directory, and run ls. There's an ...


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If you like to achieve this, you need to compare the "ctime" of the files with the "atime" of the script. This cannot be done by a vanilla find(1) implementation but only by an extended find. With a modern find(1) implementation like the BSD find or sfind, you may use -newerXY, in your case: find . -newerca script and this will find all files with a ...


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This is hackier than any of the other answers (with the possible exception of the ld-linux.so answer, which is a really clever hack), but may be more adaptable to other problems (especially if you fall into a time vortex and travel back to a Land Before Perl™). For safety, copy /bin/chmod to a safe place: cd cp /bin/chmod . Do echo chmod | cpio -oc ...


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Only the owner of a file, or the root user, can change the permissions of a file. You need either to change ownership of the file so it is owned by the deploy user, or run the script as root.


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When doing the each chmod action, touch a file, e.g. touch /tmp/foo. When the next iteration comes around, use find -newer, e.g. find . -newer /tmp/foo -exec chmod 755 {} \; and then touch /tmp/foo.


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Most programs in /usr/bin should have permissions 755 — readable and executable by all, writable only by their owner, which is root. A few programs are setuid or setgid: they have extra privileges, which are confered by the setuid or setgid bit in the permissions. /usr/bin/sudo is one of them; it needs to be setuid root: chmod 4755 /usr/bin/sudo restores it. ...


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Fortunately those permissions aren't complete destructive, but there is no "undo". If you can't restore from back-up and you haven't installed anything from source under /usr/bin you can potentially use the package manager to recover the correct permissions: For RPM based distributions (Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Fedora, CentOS etc.) doing so is fairly ...


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Your external hard disk is likely using fat32 or a similar file system that doesn't support setting these permissions. In any case, making a mp3 file executable is at least dubious.



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