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Or even easier: # setfacl -m u::rx /bin/chmod # chmod +x /bin/chmod # setfacl -b /bin/chmod


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Update I came across this post, see if this helps: http://serverfault.com/questions/228396/how-to-setup-sshs-umask-for-all-type-of-connections Add these lines to: /etc/pam.d/sshd # Setting UMASK for all ssh based connections (ssh, sftp, scp) session optional pam_umask.so umask=0027 You might also need to add them to: /etc/pam.d/login Edit: ...


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scp has a -p option: -p Preserves modification times, access times, and modes from the original file. So set your permissions locally and then do the scp. Or, you can use tar: tar -zc file.* | ssh guy@... 'tar -zx -C ~/public_html/kool-stuff; chmod 755 ~/public_html/kool-stuff/file.*' In either case, I doubt execute permissions are ...


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Refer to the answer here. Basically, rootness trumps permissions. Permissions 000 means only root can read or write the file. I'm not aware of any extra special use for the combination of root ownership and 000 permissions. Also, you could find some worthy information from this question as well. So, as user Hauke Laging points out in his ...


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You can use Access Control Lists (ACLs) for this, giving additional permissions to a specific user for a particular file or directory. First off, make sure that the filesystem in question has the acl option enabled: commonly it will by default, but you can add it to the options in fstab (and/or remount). With ACLs enabled you control the ACL on a ...


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Create a new Group called Family. Give Family RWX Permissions, i.e. 777, for all folders attached to the samba share, and make family the owning group of the folders. Then add each family member to the group family. groupadd family chown -Rv root:family /linux/path/to/samba/share useradd -G family *username for mom* useradd -G family *username for dad* ...



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