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As Giles said no. But there are tools you may be able to use to work with EBCDIC. You can not use the standard linux/unix tool-set on these files. Also you could have trouble transferring Mainframe VB files (not all file transfer programs handle Mainframe-VB files). Many Java programs (e.g. JEdit) can handle EBCDIC (CP037 or IBM037 is US Ebcdic) but most ...


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No, it would be impossible to make the whole system work in EBCDIC. This would require recompiling all programs and modifying the source code of quite a few of them (a lot of programs make assumptions like “ASCII uppercase letters are exactly the characters between A and Z”). You can make specific programs work with EBCDIC. Not a lot of programs support it ...


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This displays all high characters as <xx>: set encoding=latin1 set isprint= set display+=uhex Any single-byte encoding will work, vim uses ASCII for all lower chars and has them hard-coded as printable. Setting isprint to empty will mark everything else as non-printable. Setting uhex will display them as hexadecimal. Here is how the display changes ...


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If you need to find out the encoding of a particular file, you can use the file command: $ cat findenc.txt Let f be a measurable function from (Ω,F,μ) to (R,B(R)). then μ(|f|>t) as a function of t is Riemann integrable over [0,∞). the expectation of the measure f induces on its codomain i.e. ∫_Ω |f| dμ = ∫_[0,∞) μ(|f|>t) $ file findenc.txt ...


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This is not possible, because the validity ranges of different encodings do overlap, thus one cannot unequivocally determine which chunk of text has which encoding. You might not like the answer, but these are the facts, in my opinion.


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How do you find out the encoding charset of the example text? If you mean how to find the charset while the example text is open in emacs, then perhaps M-x describe-current-coding-system in emacs is what you're after?



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