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-1

running: apt-get install --reinstall fonts-cantarell fixed my issue.


1

I know this is an old question but i have been searching all night for a similar solution. I found a few helpful tips but they did not do exactly what i needed, so I had to mix and match a few to get the correct outcome I was looking for to simply remove special characters and replace them with a (.) dot for f in *.txt; do mv "$f" `echo $f | sed ...


4

When you press Ctrl-V, the shell will start by ignoring keyboard interrupts and simply take the pressed key combination as the input character. This is easily possible as ASCII is designed to hold all control characters. Of course, on display it has to cheat a bit and show the ^ followed by the corresponding key or otherwise it would output control ...


1

You've told bash and other applications that your terminal uses the UTF-8 encoding. That's good only if your terminal actually does use UTF-8. Bash doesn't get to decide that the terminal encoding is, the terminal gets to decide. If you want to use UTF-8, configure your terminal to use UTF-8. Since you're using SSH, you need to configure whatever terminal ...


2

It sounds as if you are using the Linux console (rather than one of the X-based terminal emulators), and that it is not running in UTF-8 mode. I would use this script to turn it on (and investigate to see why it is off): #!/bin/sh # send character-string to enable UTF-8 mode if test ".$1" = ".off" ; then printf '\033%%@' else printf ...



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