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1

The default locale on Debian is in a UTF-8 encoding, at least since wheezy (I don't remember when it switched). So you must have chosen some non-default setting during the installation. putting export LANG=en_US.UTF-8 in my .bashrc file. That's not going to work, because .bashrc is the wrong file. An environment variable defined there only applies to ...


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First, I am surprised that you are able to update Mint 15 to Debian 7.6. They after all are different distributions. I assume Debian made the decision to use ISO 8859.1 because you are located in Europe and answered some question to that effect regarding the locale.


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do I need to remember to edit the .bashrc file for every new user account that I create from now on to edit the export line in? The best idea in this case is to put it in a system wide file; first check to see if it's already being set somewhere: grep -R LANG /etc You may or may not want to change anything there. Gilles' answer probably has the ...


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The file is encoded in ISO-8859-1, not in UTF-8: $ hd 0606461.txt | grep -B1 '^0002c520' 0002c510 64 75 6d 20 66 65 72 69 65 6e 74 20 72 75 69 6e |dum ferient ruin| 0002c520 e6 0d 0a 2d 2d 48 6f 72 61 63 65 2e 0d 0a 0d 0a |...--Horace.....| And the byte "e6" alone is not a valid UTF-8 sequence. So, use iconv -f latin1 -t ascii//TRANSLIT file.


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The file you linked appears to be UTF-8 inside an HTML document $ file 0606461.txt 0606461.txt: HTML document, ASCII text, with CRLF line terminators If you run it through an HTML-to-text converter first, e.g. iconv -f UTF-8 -t ascii//TRANSLIT < <(html2text 0606461.txt) then the UTF-8 fragment you appear to be having trouble with appears to ...


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tr and grep are text processing tools. They expect their input to be text files. Computers store data as sequences of bytes. A text is a sequence of characters. There are several ways to encode characters as bytes, called character encodings. The de facto standard character encoding in most of the world, especially on OSX, is UTF-8, which is an encoding for ...


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I suppose that your charmap from the locales is UTF-8, so that you'll have problems on binary files. Just switch to C locale: LC_ALL=C tr '\r' '\n' < target-file | LC_ALL=C grep search-string


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In short, the "problem" arises from the fact that, IMAP4 encodes folder names using a modified UTF-7 coding. offlineimap does not convert folder names to something readable before creating local repositories (e.g. in UTF-8). This, in turn, derives unreadable folder names like the ones shown in the screenshot of this question. Hence, it's neither Mutt's nor ...



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