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We went with cgroups in the end, since there really doesn't seem to be any other approach that would accomplish this. Cgroups allow CPU utilization limiting through the kernel scheduler, using cpu.cfs_period_us and cpu.cfs_quota_us. This avoids the explicit specification of CPU cores.


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Remember how I said: The system uses lxc containers for compartmentalisation, but that shouldn't matter here. Well, turns out it did matter. Or rather, the cgroups at the heart of lxc matter. The host machine only sees reboots for kernel upgrades. So, what were the last kernels used? 3.19, replaced by 4.0.5 2 months ago and yesterday with 4.1.3. And ...


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Shares are relative among groups. For example, assigning 25% of CPU means that a cgroup will observe "at least" that much of CPU, but it can use more. From the red hat docs on cgroups: Note that shares of CPU time are distributed per all CPU cores on multi-core systems. Even if a cgroup is limited to less than 100% of CPU on a multi-core system, it may ...


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Have you tried a cron command for job scheduling. Refer this link https://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/Deployment_Guide-en-US/ch-autotasks.html



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