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As others have said, /var/cache/ can be used by any application to store information to save on retrieval time. In my experience though, most of the space taken up in there is from the system's package manager. From the Arch Linux wiki: pacman stores its downloaded packages in /var/cache/pacman/pkg/ and does not remove the old or uninstalled versions ...


-1

This is all fine and dandy, but what about the lag time between having to make the request for memory, mapping it out for what the disk cache has to release? Sure, you may say it's minimal, or not even noticeable, but maybe I care about the 0.0000001 seconds added because of this process. Who are you to decide how my RAM is used? What if I don't want to ...


1

Look at the keepcache parameter. I believe that it goes in /etc/dnf/dnf.conf and should read keepcache=1 or keepcache="true"


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The filesystem on Linux caches recently accessed files. These caches do not impact performance because they can be invalidated if the memory is needed. It helps the overall performance of the system to use all available pages as a disk cache. There is no caching of search results (as in, associating a certain command with a certain cached output, so that ...


0

The following Debian Forum topic and blog post based on it has the missing information. Outline -1) Back up your LVM configuration and have a like CD ready. 0) Make sure you have a separate /boot partition (your cached root will only be available later). This can be a 200MB partition and can be part of the same VG as your cached root. 1) You need ...


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I'm not sure why you want to drop the caches every hour - that is going to kill performance. There are a few problems with what you've done: You need to edit the crontab of root, as you cannot write to /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches as a non-root user. Your crontab entry is not correct. It should be: 2 * * * * /usr/bin/free && sync && echo 3 ...


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Properly configured Duplicity should not do that. You might find these steps useful: Duplicity I know you are on Ubuntu, but I cannot find any suitable source for you. It should be universal.


1

The cache that matters most for directory traversal is the inode cache. This isn't included in the “cache” figure that free displays. It's part of the kernel data (the “slab”). You can see how much memory the various slab pools occupy in /proc/slabinfo (this requires root access). You can use slabtop to see them vary in real time, or this snippet to get a ...



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