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This is an opinion based question, but truth be told, to talk about performance is such a broad topic that unless you know exactly what you want and exactly what you are experiencing it is hard to advise on something. Having said that: Check this page The author is experienced on performance and was a kernel engineer for Sun. The method he describes is ...


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This is mainly an opinion answer which depends on my past experiences and nothing else. I am not a programmer and Solaris (any version) is my least favorite UNIX flavor. I try to get away with doing as little as possible on Solaris system. Having said that, I worked with T4 systems in the recent past and the CPU is a work horse. It takes a lot more than ...


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If you look at the kernel's inode source code, you can see that the ihash_entries is set at the kernel level only. There is no user or process level considerations at all. Adding those could drastically decrease performance which would be counter productive. It would also imply keeping track of all processes that used the cached entries, therefore ...


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If that is a static file, most likely your browser doesn't really retrieve the new file, you can check that by pressing Shift while clicking refresh (at least in Firefox). If that doesn't work, it is probably your webserver doesn't notice the change in that case reloading the webserver is normally enough. E.g for apache2 service apache2 reload or ...


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You have LVM set up on /dev/sda2, so you need to run make-bcache on the logical volumes (LVs) instead of the raw partition. If you want to use both the centos-root and centos-home LVs as backing devices and the entire SSD as a cache device, you can set this up with make-bcache --bdev /dev/mapper/centos-root /dev/mapper/centos-home --cache /dev/sdb See ...


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The cache target requires 3 devices, but you have only specified two. I believe the devices also must be dm devices, not a scsi disk.


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This command creates metadata cache for downloads: sudo dnf makecache To instruct dnf to be more resource-aware and to terminate immediately if it’s too soon after the last successful makecache run we add timer to it: sudo dnf makecache timer


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If you want to prevent disk writes as much as possible, you can do this with Laptop Mode. One of the features of laptop mode is to allow a disk to spin down and to prevent the kernel from writing to it until memory gets full or until a timeout occurs (or until the disk needs to spin up in order to read data from it). See also the Arch Wiki. You'll presumably ...


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sounds like a job for eatmydata ( http://www.makelinux.net/man/1/E/eatmydata ) in debian, try something like apt-get install eatmydata; printf "\nLD_PRELOAD=libeatmydata.so" >> /etc/ld.so.preload reboot



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