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Try memleax, which detects memory leak of running process. It works like gdb and strace. It attaches a running process, hooks memory allocate/free APIs, records all memory blocks, and reports the blocks which lives longer than 5 seconds (you can change this time by -e option). It's lightweight, and more suitable for production environment. It supports ...


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if [ "1024" == "$((32*32))" ]; then echo "The test worked" else echo "The test failed" fi This ought to work; if your shell does not use $(( )) for arithmetic, the strings will not match. You can also shorthand it with: [ "1024" == "$((32*32))" ] || echo "I can't math!"


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You have two processes reading from /dev/pts/2. One is the shell (or some application) running there, the other is your application on pts/1. It's random which one is faster reading the available bytes.


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Actually, your virtual stack size is 8388608 bytes (8 MB). Of course, it's natural to conclude that this can't be right, because that's a ridiculously large amount of memory for every thread to consume for its stack when 99% of the time a couple of KB is probably all they need. The good news is that your thread only uses the amount of physical memory that ...


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The two main reasons to run a program directly without calling the shell are: Performance: Most programs that you would call from your C program are likely much smaller than the shell, which makes them start much more quickly. Environment control: Dealing with an additional layer of environment variables to deal with can be more complex to configure and ...



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