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Install the package libjson-glib-dev. It and its dependencies contain the files you need. json-glib/json-glib.h is under /usr/include/json-glib-1.0. so the symbolic link you created is not useful. Remove it (it may confuse configure scripts). To get the compiler to search for header files under /usr/include/json-glib-1.0, you need to pass the option -I /usr/...


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zero is a legal file descriptor. The openpty call will (like open) return a positive integer (zero or more). They return -1 on error. A successful call returns a new (previously unused) file descriptor. You could get this result you had closed stdin (also legal, done occasionally in daemon/service code).


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By default there is no authentication, so long as the client uses the apropriate socket number the server will accept the connection. look as SSL and SASL for some examples of authentication.


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I'm not a Rasbian user, but I'm assuming that you've just installed the JSON GLib libraries. You also need the header files. These are available in the json-glib-dev package. As a general piece of advice: If you find yourself moving things (libraries, binaries) around as root, or creating symlinks here and there, then it is highly likely that you're ...


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pgrep -U username|xargs kill -9


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I think the issue is that front:, from the other question, would not have worked since front: refers to a set of speakers, rather than a microphone or recording device. You could use the hw:CARD=X,Y format, but you'll get a little bit more flexibility if you use, as @CL suggests, the plughw:CARD=X,Y. Plughw can automatically take care of resampling or value ...


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The classic Unix tool for this job is indent (e.g., GNU indent). Called in K&R mode, it will indent your example code as you asked (assuming you actually want puts indented): $ indent -kr <sample.c int main() { puts("Hello world"); } A more modern solution may be clang-format (http://clang.llvm.org/docs/ClangFormat.html), which can be ...



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