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You can write your code wherever you want, it's just text files. If you wish to compile the code for a platform that is different from the one on which the compiler runs, then you need a cross compiler (by definition). Cross compilers are commonly used to build code using powerful desktop computers than targets resource-limited embedded systems including ...


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According to GMP documentation https://gmplib.org/manual/Build-Options.html you should use those options: When cross-compiling, the system used for compiling is given by ‘--build’ and the system where the library will run is given by ‘--host’. For example when using a FreeBSD Athlon system to build GNU/Linux m68k binaries, ./configure ...


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Right. That does it. Time to script around journalctl. #!/bin/bash set -o nounset declare -a OPTIONS declare -a MATCHES OPTIONS=() MATCHES=() function processOptions { local UNKNOWN= local HELP= local SYSLOGSEL=0 for PARAM in "$@"; do if [[ $PARAM == '--kern' || $PARAM == '--kernel' ]]; then (( SYSLOGSEL += 1 )); if [[ ...


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I think VFS modules extend the functionality of a posix file system. https://www.samba.org/samba/docs/man/Samba-Developers-Guide/vfs.html For example support for extended attributes for a particular file system is optional. However you can selective enable/ disable it.


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You can also retrieve a precompiled version with static-get static-get -x gcc


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It turns out that the files in /var/lib/rpm with db in their names are not Berkeley database files. The files with no db in their names are Berkeley database files. So trying to open a file named __db.001 is the wrong thing to do. (Thought about just deleting the question, but other people may run into this).


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The first thing to note, is that the configure system has two top_dir's. A top directory for where the source code resides, and a top directory for where the code gets built. Often these two directories are the same. But there are situations where the source code resides say on a read-only file system, so you need to build the software somewhere else. Below ...


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To check whether a library is installed correctly, you'd usually try building a program using it. make check runs tests in the build tree, not on the installed files. In your case they passed, which is good, but it's not sufficient to ensure you'll be able to build software using FFTW. The presence of the files you list in /usr/local/lib indicates that ...



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