Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

It's the standard C "address of" operator... The construction above means: __skb: the parameter given to the macro (a pointer to a struct skbuff) (__skb)->cb: the cb array in the skb (__skb)->cb[0]: the first element in the array &((__skb)->cb[0]): the address of the first element ((struct tcp_skb_cb *)&((__skb)->cb[0])): the address of ...


2

That has nothing to do with cat, pipes or buffering. Your "problem" is upstreams, at the terminal device. If every character you enter at the keyboard in the terminal was available for reading by your application immediately and cat, then would you enter aBackspacebReturn, your application would read a then ^? then b then ^M, which is not what you want and ...


-2

follow this loop: while((ch=getchar())!=EOF) { write(p[1],&ch,1); } with: char carriageReturn = 0x0D; write( p[1], &carriageReturn, 1 );


2

My first comment is all of what you state will only work if the filesystem on the device you're interested in is currently mounted. But I guess you know that and accept that limitation. The method you propose seems quite thorough and I think it will catch all cases. About looking ip in /sys/dev/block: You're not looking for <maj>:0 as you state. ...


3

The answer is "Other". You can get a glimpse of the memory layout with cat /proc/self/maps. On my 64-bit Arch laptop:: 00400000-0040c000 r-xp 00000000 08:02 1186758 /usr/bin/cat 0060b000-0060c000 r--p 0000b000 08:02 1186758 /usr/bin/cat 0060c000-0060d000 rw-p 0000c000 08:02 1186758 ...


2

You should be aware that the "latency" might include the stdio system buffering enough output for an "efficient" filesystem write. See man 3 setbuf for some further information. The buffering is on a per FILE * basis, so stderr is typically unbuffered, while stdio is typically buffered. That's why output to stderr and output to stdout end up appearing ...


1

First, keep in mind that it is rather unconventional to have your module's code logic change according to other modules' results: this is usually done by using control flags, such as required and requisite, which control which modules get called, in which situations (i.e. according to the current chain status, previous modules' results). With that in mind, ...


0

In Ubuntu, lxc-dev contains the header files, so it's the starting point for writing code using the LXC libraries. Typically for Ubuntu, foo provides stuff that end-users expect, and foo-dev provides what developers need.


7

Sure, of course, since you can develop portable software that runs on both MacOS and Linux. Be sure to test it on Linux at regular intervals to make sure you haven't unintentionally added something unportable. If you want to use Linux-specific features then you will have more of a hard time. Depending on what it is you do, the program may compile on MacOS ...



Top 50 recent answers are included