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6

From the byobu documentation: See: Status Notifications Here's a few samples from the documentation: cpu_count - the number of cpu's or cores on the system; displayed in the lower bar toward the right in the default text color on the default background, followed by a trailing 'x' cpu_freq - the current frequency of the cpu in GHz; displayed ...


5

Unfortunately, GNU Screen is unable to cleanly support UTF8 in the status bar. This was one of several reasons why I added the Tmux backend support to Byobu. Full disclosure: I'm the author and maintainer of Byobu.


4

Try this, it worked for me on putty: Ctrl+Q - XON Ctrl+S - XOFF


4

You can send a command to a particular screen window of a particular screen session without attaching to it. screen -S sessionname -p windowname -X screencommand The session name is set with the -S option when starting screen or the sessionname command; by default it's byobu with byobu. You can also use the screen PID after -S. You can set a window's name ...


3

It's possible that there's a runaway status script from Byobu that's consuming all of the CPU. You can perhaps disable them one by one until you find the culprit. The updates_available script is probably the most resource intensive, and the one that causes this sort of trouble most often. If you do find which one is misbehaving, please file a bug at ...


3

It could be many things. Please provide the output of: echo $TERM echo $LS_COLORS typeset -p LS_COLORS alias ls tput setaf 1 | od -c echo "$(tput setaf 1)red$(tput sgr0)" Expected results: xterm (optional, see below) no=00:... (or similar, should not be empty) declare -x LS_COLORS="no=00:..." (ditto) alias ls='ls --color=auto' (or similar) 0000000 033 ...


3

You can directly attach to a previously detached byobu/screen session including the window: byobu -r -p2 will reattach into window 2 (or a named one). -X can send any command to a byobu/screen session and also works with the -p switch. byobu -p2 -X stuff "uname -a $(echo -ne '\r')" This will send a uname -a to the second (third actually) byobu window, ...


3

Byobu now also supports a tmux backend, in addition to screen. For tmux, you can issue the lock-session (to lock the entire session and all attached clients), or the lock-client command, to just lock the current client.


3

GNU screen (one backend that byobu can use, along with tmux) has the lockscreen functionality. Have a look at the man page to see what it does. The default binding is C-a C-x. With regard to your trying to lock root out, it's rather pointless. What you can try is to find a locking program that let you set a password and hope that root doesn't know about it. ...


2

Ok, I've fixed those problems: linked /usr/local/bin/bash to /bin/bash linked /usr/local/bin/byobu-config to /usr/bin/byobu-config linked /usr/local/bin/byobu-status to /usr/bin/byobu-status Reinstalled newt from the ports collection with WITH_PYTHON=true


2

I needed to do the same thing, found the key documented as Dustin Kirkland had stated, but for me, ctrlb shift-F12. Of course, if you have remapped your bind-key to ctrla then adjust accordingly. The bind-key is not necessary for this to work. It is a toggle, so you only need to toggle it once with the shift-F12 and then if you need the Byobu function keys ...


2

If it's important to use the same shell use the --rcfile flag. $ cat test.bashrc ls PS1='TEST \$' $ screen -t test bash --rcfile test.bashrc -i a.file b.file test.bashrc TEST $ If your .bashrc is setting the environment, be sure to source it.


1

I think the best way to do this would be to use tmux's command-prompt action. With a running Byobu (or tmux) session, simply run: tmux command-prompt -p "backup finished" This will print the message, "backup finished", in the status line, and stay there until you hit "enter" to acknowledge it. Note that it's not window specific, but that command can be ...


1

You could switch the irssi process to use tmux, instead of the login process.


1

If you want a command to be executed at boot time, you can put it in your crontab with @crontab instead of a time. So run crontab and add a line like @reboot byobu -S boot-time mycommand Instead of putting the command on the command line of byobu, you can put it in a Byobu session file. If you want the session to be executed as root, you can start it ...


1

This was bothering me as well, so I wrote a tmux plugin for this. It's not perfect, but can easily be extended to know how to safely kill most kinds of processes before exiting tmux: tmux-safekill


1

tmux kill-session [-t session_name] the processes in the virtual terminals should receive SIGHUP.


1

You can toggle Byobu's use of the F-keys on and off by pressing: ctrla-!


1

This was a bug in a previous version of Byobu. It should be fixed now. If you can still reproduce it with the latest released version, then please open a bug at https://bugs.launchpad.net/byobu. Thanks!


1

Not sure how to make this work with the window file as that seems to be dedicated to screen, but I may be wrong. Anyway, the following works with byobu here (tmux backend): byobu new-session -n NAME -d \; split \; attach You may also want to take a look at this.


1

The bug is in version 5.21 of byobu currently on the official Ubuntu repos. In the byobu PPA, version 5.22 doesn't bleed colors to the right anymore. Still no answer on the {-} issue. Procedure: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:byobu/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install byobu


1

As of Byobu 5.x, several menu options have been deprecated, most notably the ones you've mentioned (the ability to choose your colors and set default windows). Regarding the colors, you can trivially set them by editing the file ~/.byobu/colors or ~/.byobu/colors.tmux depending on your backend (screen or tmux). When Byobu was originally released (under its ...


1

If you're experiencing this, you will need to edit /usr/share/byobu/profiles/common and comment out these two lines: attrcolor b ".I" termcapinfo xterm 'Co#256:AB=\E[48;5;%dm:AF=\E[38;5;%dm' I've not yet figured out what combination of terminals experience this problem, but there is an open bug, and rest assured ...


1

You are probably missing \[ and \] in your PS1. It needs to go around every non-printing escape sequence, e.g. the escape sequences used to color things blue and yellow. See the bash man page for details. It's in the section titled "Prompting". It's also documented in the info docs under Controlling the Prompt.



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