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17

You can't use dd this way (it might work for DVD-RAM though). What you are looking for is growisofs - (the main) part of dvd+rw-tools. growisofs -Z /dev/dvdrw=image.iso


6

Using dd command you can not write DVD. You can write DVD using growisofs command. First you have to create ISO Using dd command like dd if=/dev/dvd of=my_test.iso bs=2048 Then write DVD Using this command growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/dvd=my_test.iso


6

For video data You can use the -dvd-video option to genisoimage/mkisofs to enable the creation of UDF structures required for video playback. Normally this is done in one operation with growisofs (which calls genisoimage itself), e.g. $ growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/dvd -dvd-video /path/to/dir however you could use genisoimage by itself to create an ...


4

You can also try fpart, a tool I've written (BSD-licensed) : https://sourceforge.net/projects/fpart/


4

If the ISO file is the same one used to burn the CD, then here are my two favourites: diff /dev/sr0 /tmp/file.iso Compares the recorded image against the image file. If you feel a bit more masochistic, you could try something like this: sha1sum /dev/sr0 /tmp/file.iso and compare the signatures. This one's more useful if you already have the SHA1 sum ...


4

The original CD data storage size was 650 MiB; these are also called 74 minute CDs, since that's the amount of audio data you can get into the same space. Well after CD-Rs started becoming available, you started seeing 700 MiB (or 80 minute) CD-Rs. Most CD-Rs sold these days are of this newer sort. I've never seen a CD-R capable of holding ...


4

If you are creating an image of the bin directory, either put your boot image in bin/bin/boot.bin or specify it as boot.bin. The boot image path is relative to the source path (bin).


3

Yes it will. Pioneer, manufacturer of your drive states: The DVR-KD08 Internal Slim-line DVD/CD Writer from Pioneer offers many industry leading technologies, including: Write Speed: Up to 8x on DVD-R/+R, DVD+RW, up to 6x on DVD-R DL/+R DL, DVD-RW, up to 5x on DVD-RAM, up to 24x on CD-R, and up to 24x on CD-RW Read Speed: Up to 8x on ...


3

As said in a comment, there is a cleaner way of doing that: wodim -prcap which gives exactly what you need. Device seems to be: Generic mmc2 DVD-R/DVD-RW. Also, dmesg | grep RW, in my case (DVD-RW/BD reader drive) it returns something like [ 2.399074] ata2.00: ATAPI: HL-DT-ST DVDRW/BDROM CT40N, A101, max UDMA/133 [ 2.409247] scsi 1:0:0:0: CD-ROM ...


3

If you have control over both systems, you could share the data with NFS, mount it on your system, and burn your image just as you would if the data was local. There's also sshfs, which lets you mount a remote machine's filesystem using ssh as the data bearer.


3

First, you rip your CD to a temporary file: dd if=/dev/sr0 of=copy.iso Then you check if copy.iso and orig.iso have the same size, for example with: stat -c '%s %n' orig.iso copy.iso If the size is identical, it's easy: sha1sum orig.iso copy.iso But I noticed that in certain cases the size can be slightly different because there are trailing zeroes ...


2

The CD-DA, CD-ROM, CD-R and CD-RW formats all store information in 2,352 byte sectors, divided into 98 distinct 24-byte frames. On CD-DA discs, each 24-byte frame holds two 16-byte audio samples, one for each stereo channel. The CD-ROM specification defines two sector modes, Mode 1 and Mode 2, which describe two different sector layouts. Both modes reserve ...


2

You can check that CD is fully readable by using dd (for example dd if=/dev/cdrom of=/dev/null). But you can't compare it directly with an ISO image. Each software will create slightly different ISO file (maybe some different headers, or padding), although these different ISO images will all provide the same CD contents (directory structure, file attributes ...


2

If you can ssh to the system where the ISO file resides you can do this: ssh syswithiso 'cat /path/to/file.iso' | growisofs -Z /dev/dvd=/dev/fd/0 NOTE: The /dev/fd/0 is the file descriptor for STDIN. References Hard Drive Cloning in Linux


2

The main thing to look out for is the difference between DVD "plus" RW and DVD "minus" RW. If the drive only supports one, you can only use that type of blank disc. However, this model appears to support both DVD "plus" RWs and DVD "minus" RWs (this is based on information retrieved from a couple searches) so your disc should work in this drive. As far as ...


2

Example using wget (for downloading), bfr (for buffering), and growisofs for burning: wget -q -O - http://somewhere/image.iso \ | bfr -b 512m -p -i 100% -m 10% -t 120 -T 95% \ | growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/cdrom=/dev/fd/0 The buffering part is optional, but without it you will have to rely on your drive to cope with buffer underruns. That doesn't work ...


1

Most likely, you have bad hardware. Its probably low-quality or defectively manufactured CD-R blanks, but it could also be a bad drive (either the reading drive or the writing drive, if those are different). You're not noticing it with the audio disks (I assume you mean CD-DA, as in the discs you put in an ordinary CD player) because the players are ...


1

The nature of this question has changed since I answered it (and now seems a bit offtopic to UL), but here is a second take on it. If you want XP on the external hard drive you could install in a VM using the raw disk partition as the backing storage (rather than a sparse file). Don't install the guest additions or other things and you can probably boot ...


1

Tools like wodim, cdrecord, or brasero are usually suggested for CD-ROM burning under Debian. These applications have more complete handling of burn speed, readback, and device specific ioctls that dd lacks. You are looking more at limitations of the fact that CD burning is a post-design kludge than any fundamental, fixable problems with the raw device ...


1

Simply enough: lshal|grep dvdr


1

I don't think what you are looking for exists due to technical limitations. Puppy linux might get away with it because both their user base and distro are small. Small user base means that the cases that hit a dead end are few enough not to worry about. Since the distro is small and leaves space on the media they can get away with this for longer. Most ...


1

I tried everything I could think of with cdrdao, but I couldn't get past the error. Then I tired cdrecord, and it worked fine. cdrecord data.iso I still was able to make the first session of the disc using cdrdao, which was the important part for me.


1

Why not use the standard utility in cdrkit package: dirsplit It can create ready-to-use folders with links to easily create DVDs with K3b or other GUI software


1

We shouldn't forget that the essence of the task is indeed quite simple; as put in a tutorial on Haskell (which is written around the working through of the solution for this task, incrementally refined) Now let's think for a moment about how our program will operate and express it in pseudocode: main = Read list of directories and their sizes. ...


1

I once wrote a script to solve a similar problem -- I called it "distribute" (you can read the main code of the script or the file with the help message, or download it as a package); from its description: distribute -- Distribute a collection of packages on multiple CDs (especially good for future use with APT) Description: `distribute' ...


1

I once made an ugly script for a similar purpose. It is just a kludge, but when I wrote it I didn't care about execution time or prettiness. I'm sure there are more "productified" versions of the same concept around, but If you wish to get some ideas or something to start hacking on, here goes (did it in 2008, so use at your own risk!) :-) #!/bin/sh - ...


1

You should be able to find out exactly what types of disks your burner will support. That error message indicates it doesn't support DVD-R (as backed up by your comment that it did work with a DVD+R disk) As Gilles commented, you should be able to use dvd+rw-mediainfo but failing that, you could look at the physical writer itself.


1

You may be using a bad fork of the CD writing software. It seems that Debian forked the cdrecord tools five years ago, and one fork does not work well, including emitting errors about exclusive locks on the CD device. Get a copy of the real software by going to http://cdrecord.berlios.de/ Also (even though you may not be using ubuntu) the following may be ...


1

fuser -a /media/cdrom Usually that tells you which process is accessing or locking the resource.



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