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1

Yes, for PC-BSD you can install programs using the Appcafe, packages or ports. They MAY conflict. I exclusively use packages (or ports) and avoid the Appcafe at all costs. I don't remember why, just that I had issues with it years ago. The package system is installed by default. If you need ports you can portsnap them or git them (see what I did there??) ...


0

I have seen that if OpenBSD uses one of my programs in the base system, they may ignore the configure script: ncurses (see ncurses_cfg.h) form (see Makefile) menu (see Makefile) panel (see Makefile) infocmp (see Makefile) Then again, they may not. It depends on who did the work: lynx (apparently used the configure script, though some patches removed ...


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I've found a solution on my own by deep reading man lsof. (Yes, RT*M still helps.) Thanks @Gilles for aiming. Here is the solution: lsof -aPi -p 555 (555 is the PID). Explanation: -p to specify the PID number; -i to display only network devices; -a to AND two conditions above (otherwise they will be ORed); -P to display port numbers (instead port names ...


1

I would suggest that any decent not-so-modern x86_64 true server should be able do a full build in a couple of hours or maybe less, including xsrc. My NetBSD-current build server is a Xen domU with 8GB RAM and 8 VCPUs running on a Dell PE2950 8-core (Xeon E5440 @2.83GHz) with 32GB RAM and with a decently fast set of SAS disks on the integrated PERC 6/i ...


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lsof provides information about files opened by processes, including network ports. It's available on pretty much all unix systems, including OSX. The Rosetta Stone for Unix doesn't list any other tool for “match process to file or port” on OSX. To list processes listening on a TCP port, you can use lsof -iTCP -sTCP:LISTEN lsof -iUDP lists processes ...


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On FreeBSD, you can use sockstat for this information. I am not sure whether OS X has sockstat, as I don't have a Mac. For instance, to see all of the TCPv4 connections: sockstat -4


-1

if you want to know which port is listening you can use netstat's -p option.you need to be the superuser: $ sudo netstat -nlp | grep 80 tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:80 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 125004/nginx if you want to know more about it try this link


2

It takes roughly a day for me to build 5 or so different architectures, as complete release builds (aka, tarballs and ISO images.) I'm building on a relatively low memory (512M), i386 virtual machine, using a script that also checks out the sources, and does a bunch of setup around build.sh. If you have more than one processor/core, you can speed things up ...


2

Maybe it will take more than 90 min to build the kernel . To speed up the compilation process we need to use -j option for example if you have 2 core you can type: fakeroot make-kpkg..... -j 2 or make -j 2 you can speed up the compilation process X2 ( 45 min) , (8 core less than 10min) Also you can use the CONCURRENCY_LEVEL variable for example if ...


0

This will use the find command to retrieve dot files and files with the "hidden" flag set. The matching files are fed as an argument list into ls via sed (to remove the "." result as well as leading "./" prefixes) and xargs. This allows for the specification of additional ls parameters (e.g. -l). alias l.="find . \( -flags +hidden -or -name '.*' \) ...


3

This is traditionally done with an expect script. Eg #!/usr/bin/expect -- set user [lindex $argv 0] set oldpassword [lindex $argv 1] set password [lindex $argv 2] spawn kpasswd $user expect "password" send "$oldpassword\r" expect "password" send "$password\r" expect "password" send "$password\r" expect eof ...


3

Depending on the source (and weight you may attach), shar dates back to around 1980. In a form which you might recognize, that comes from Rich Salz's implementation introduced in 1988, and improved in stages over the next few years. shar was originally a convenience for bundling text files. uuencoding (a way to send binary files) has been around at least ...


2

You are mistaken, shell archivers did exist no later than 1980. They have been written for the usenet source archives in order to allow the archives to appear inside a mail. Tar is binary and cannot easily be in a usenet source archive.



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