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3

On a GNU system, the program you're looking for is man. BROWSER=firefox man --html man Try that command (or substitute some other valid value for BROWSER=, such as, for example, cat with a redirect if you wish to save the result) and see what you get. If you want it to be the default configuration, you'll find instructions for configuring man to your ...


2

I have no idea why you would want to do this, it seems far simpler to just keep a terminal window open, but you can create HTML versions of all your manuals like this (assuming the names of the directories where your manuals are stored contain no whitespace): Install man2html sudo apt-get install man2html Create the directory where you will keep the HTML ...


4

There is xman, a graphical utility for displaying manpages. I don't know anyone who has ever used it though. It was old an archaic already 20 years ago. For your stated use case of having manual pages displayed all the time, you'd probably be better off just opening a new terminal window and typing man something than by using xman.


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You can use man2html(this is how the package is usually called), an example. man 1 man | man2html > man.html And then use firefox, elinks or whatever browser you want to view it. There are also some services that keep manpages such as http://manpages.ubuntu.com/


1

Write a screen saver. This is not as crazy as it sounds. Xlock uses screensavers to draw on the screen that are not part of the screen locker so you can write a simple shell script which kills the browser then execs another screensaver to draw on the screen, and set xlock to use that script as the screensaver. I could probably get it down to about five ...


4

Since you use low ressources, I'm gonna guess the default screenlocker is xlock without any screensaver turned on. In that case. You'll have to edit the command for screen locking from "xlock" to "xlock && pkill firefox" or "xlock && pkill chromium". I dont know more on this but basically, if you add " && " after a command, you ...


2

I have to disagree with @dave_thompson_085 on this. To me this is clearly a listening socket since the local address is specified and the foreign address is set to any:any. In other words the local system is waiting for udp datagrams incoming to port 5353 on any interface and from any port on any foreign IP address. This is supported by netstat itself using ...


0

This is not really a UNIX answer, but if you don't mind leaving it running in the browser: window.setInterval(function () { document.getElementsByName('GENERATE_DAILY_TRENDS')[0].click(); }, 1000); // 1000 milliseconds And if you want a bookmarklet that you can click to get it going (once you're already on the page), add this for the bookmark url: ...


1

You could use xdotool to get your mouse at your desired position and click the button: xdotool mousemove 100 100 click 1


0

Google Chrome and Chrome Remote Desktop are excellent userland options, as @jcbermu has already suggested. Other options would include something like VNC, which can seem a bit daunting at first but is actually not too hard. If you want to minimize what needs to be installed on the computer you are using to access the media server, you could use guacamole ...


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1 - Install Google Chrome and Chrome Remote Desktop on the media server. 2- On other PCs, from Google Chrome you will be able to acccess the graphical interface of the media server.



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