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9

The boot flag is from ancient times, where you would indicate an MBR partition record as bootable, so you could indicate where the boot loader resided. On modern OS'es this is widely unused, as the MBR consists of a minimal stage loader which bootstraps either into its own partition or jumps to another area on the disk where the boot loader code is kept. ...


8

There are several steps in the boot process (I'm describing a traditional PC BIOS): The BIOS reads the first sector (512 bytes) of the boot disk. The code in this first sector reads further data and code at a fixed location through the BIOS interface. This BIOS interface only exposes two hard disks: disk 0 is wherever the first sector was read from, and ...


7

So, it sounds like you have not installed a boot loader (e.g. grub) on the disk. This means that although you have a valid OS on it, there is no way to boot it and so you can't use it. You need to attach the HDD to a working computer (you can use a live CD), set up a chroot environment and install grub on it. Mount the partition you will be using as / (I ...


7

That procedure has always worked for me. I tried using unetbootin with debian but for some reasons it never worked for me (strangely, it works without problems for other distros i've tried like Ubuntu, Finnix (both Debian based!) and CentOS). But now, starting from Squeeze release, I found that the netinstall iso image works flawlessly from USB, too! ...


5

I'm working on an update to this question/answer. This doesn't work without errors, but as I worked with @jiewmeng I uncovered that the goal was to use a USB to install both Windows and Ubuntu onto one hard drive, UEFI. It has taken a while and I've found the solution but we need to clean the question and answer. Maybe the original question can be answered ...


4

The MBR is 512 bytes, so a quick way to see if GRUB is there... dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 count=1 | xxd That dumps the MBR, I see "GRUB" in mine at byte 0x17F = 383. dd if=/dev/sda bs=1 count=4 skip=383 When I do that, it prints 'GRUB' followed by the dd output. You can wrap that in a bash for loop or something to go across more drives. if you don't want ...


3

You have to Convert the ISO to UDRW format using: hdiutil convert -format UDRW -o destination_file.img source_file.iso for Further steps and reference click this link, go with the steps: Create bootable USB stick from ISO in Mac OS X


3

The terminology you're looking for is often called physical to virtual or virtual to physical. It's often shortened to P2V and V2P. There's a tutorial on how to do this for VMware and Virtualbox over on the AskUbuntu site. The Q&A is titled: Migrate from a virtual machine (VM) to a physical system. Migrating a Windows Guest I found these instructions ...


3

It is certainly possible to roll your own version of this concept with Grub. However there are also tools that can make the process much easier. PenDriveLinux lists several tools. Of those I have had good luck with Yumi, which is Windows based, and MultiSystem which is Linux-based. The MultiSystem project website is in French, but PenDriveLinux has good ...


3

You can try dd, like dd if=/path/to/slax.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=1M . Make sure to replace sdb with the actual USB stick.


3

Well I guess I solved my own question. Debian Images with "update" is not supposed to be bootable. http://www.debian.org/CD/faq/#update-cd


3

You can use Tiny Core Linux; it takes 8mb


3

Introduction For a drive with PC partitions (which is what you'll find on most USB sticks), the bootloader consist in a tiny part at the very beginning of the drive (the stage 1 bootloader, in the boot sector of the drive) and a larger part elsewhere (the stage 2 bootloader, in a file). The stage 1 data contains the physical location of stage 2. If you copy ...


2

The best answer to this question will depend on (1) how fast is "fast", (2) how exotic the hardware you need to support is and (3) how robust of a system you want after boot. There are a good number of Linux distribution aimed at being small and a good number that provide live images. The intersection of these two sets is also fairly large. If the lan ...


2

Any live Linux distribution will work just fine for this. Ubuntu has a fancy GUI. SystemRescueCD comes with many system repair tools, including networking tools. BackTrack is targetted at penetration testing, so it comes with a lot of networking tools, especially for network inspection and packet injection.


2

Leave the stick unmounted and then as root: cat XXXX.iso > /dev/sdX sync


2

I will do my best to answer the question, hopefully I'll get you in the right direction. As you already know, Win7 x64 installation from GPT is only possible from EFI. Even worse your prevented from using any hybrid, as Win7 x64 treats any hybrid disk as legacy MBR. So you have to relabel/repartition your USB as GPT. This type of setup is not preferable ...


2

Yes, it is possible to install linux from another linux install. One way is known as "poor man's install". You create a partition, copy the ISO contents there and use GRUB to boot and start the installer from that partition. There are several guides available online, e.g.: Ubuntu Debian (see Installation media: Hard Disk) Fedora (see Preparing for a Hard ...


2

you've installed Debian in a logical partition and in the msdos partition table you can not set logical partition as bootable you can resize the first partition (/dev/sda1) and make a 1G ext3 or ext4 partition before that then run a live boot and: mount the new partition (that is /dev/sda1 now) under somewhere like /mnt # mount /dev/sda1 /mnt then ...


2

As the comment above states (from cnst), UDRW appears to be Apple/mac/OSX proprietary. I had to convert to "UDTO - DVD/CD-R master for export" to make the USB bootable on other machines. When dd is finished in this case OSX (Mavericks) complains that it cannot read the disk/USB in this format which kinda confirms it. Also, unetbootin for OSX does not work ...


2

While trying different things, I've got it to work and am now operating on Windows again. Solution: Legacy Boot inside the BIOS settings should be enabled. I believe the selection will be labeled as CSM (as opposed to EFI) and in the accompanying description it is referred to as legacy. Started right up from the USB. Now to tell the others. "I came, I ...


2

I am the author of those instructions on chtaube.eu :) dd is a little bit inconsistent when it comes to sizes: bs=1M defines a blocksize of 1 mebibyte meaning 1024*1024 bytes. 30 mebibytes are 30*1024*1024 = 31457280 bytes. dd's final output uses the decimal megabyte with 1 MB = 1000*1000 bytes. This is why it is shown as 31 MB. So there is nothing to worry ...


1

[...] if I could copy the latest installation media ISO [...] As a more thorough inspection of the pen shows, all the default bootable pen has are images like ISOs. And so it does not really matter the system in which they're in is iso9660 itself; unless you were to extract every one of them, re-configured it all, and change from iso9660 to a writeable ...


1

Here is a Windows based tool, ISO to USB. Also you could try using UNetbootin to write an ISO file to a USB thumb drive too. UNetbootin runs on all OSes. excerpt from UNetbootin website UNetbootin allows you to create bootable Live USB drives for Ubuntu, Fedora, and other Linux distributions without burning a CD. It runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. ...


1

From a bootup perspective, the kernel file itself is just a configuration option fed to grub. As long as grub can find the kernel, you should be good to go. You will however need something to use as a rootfs, so a partition or dd image on your usb key would make sense, and then store your kernel file in there. Likely you can even get away with putting it ...


1

Setting the Sandisk 32GB USB stick as HDD instead of auto-detected FDD mode worked. I guess that old BIOS was mistaken. Unfortunately the BIOS update only runs in Windows. (Should i try it in Zorin?) Windows 7 recognized the USB stick as local drive correctly, it turns out. Weird.


1

Here the Detailed Visual-Guide to Boot from Debian Installation Media on Win8: http://install-climber.blogspot.it/2013/01/howtoinstall-linuxdebian7wheezy-pcwindows8preinstalleduefi.html


1

Start with bdowning's answer above, then continue here to add Parted Magic. There are a couple of ways to go about this, but the simplest is to copy the pmagic directory from the Parted Magic ISO to the root of your usb disk, and then add a menu entry for it: menuentry "Parted Magic" --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os { linux /pmagic/bzImage ...


1

Have you looked into this? http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/


1

In 256 Mb you can have GUI, web browser, text editor and a music player! Install puppy linux on your usb. It is a fully operational Linux with a nice UI (and terminal to run commands). You can find instructions at pendrivelinux. If you want something even smaller then have a look at Damn Small Linux. Edit: You can set init to 3 from 5 in file /etc/inittab ...



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