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Sorry that this is posted as an 'answer'. I think it is probably more of a comment, but I just don't enough rep to post a comment... :( Anwyay, TurnKey Linux is currently based on Debian (v13.x is based on Debian Wheezy; previous v12.x based on Squeeze; prior to that it was Ubuntu based - v11.x based on Lucid). I have read that editing /etc/default/rcS and ...


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Ok, the next few boots identified the problem. There were increasing problems reading the memory, and eventually the video never even turned on for the bios power-on self test. I opened up the case -- the graphics card and AGP slot have a scorch mark covering 2-3 connectors. The card is busted, probably ditto for the main board.


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When the system transitions from one runlevel to another, it executes all the "K" scripts in the existing runlevel, in order, then all the "S" scripts in the new runlevel, in order. Debian implements parallel boot, so most of the scripts will run concurrently (but effectively in order), and there's a standard for including dependency information on each ...


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Was an UEFI configuration problem, Hitachi SMP blades with more than 1TB of RAM need some tweeks. (Firmware dependant, so if you have such problem, ask Hitachi for the correct parameters).


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That was because the downloading was not complete, Although Chrome showed that it is complete I re-downloaded from another browser and it work fine now.


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First, I would not use MBR, because you have there 4 OS's and that will not go far. You need to have the /boot partition as primary and not extended. So you either throw out the Solaris installation, or the Linux one. Booting into FreeBSD (or PC-BSD... whatever, makes no difference) with GRUB2 is easy. You just define your "set root=..." and then you say ...


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Boot in Shell mode from your LiveCD and active your partition as follow : gpart set -a active ada0


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I'm most familiar with how Cobbler sets up TFTP so I'm not sure if this is relevant but I'll offer this info up anyway. Cobbler sets up a bootloader using pxelinux.0 as @Patrick explains in the comments as well as @msw. But it also sets up a corresponding pxelinux.cfg/ directory along side it that contains MAC addresses for each system that will be ...


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The comment @Patrick made to your question was dead right: all the client machine needs to bootstrap PXE is to broadcast a DHCP request. The DHCP server (usually on the PXE boot server) will see the MAC address of the client device and will use it to give the client an IP address tell the client what files it should get from the PXE server at that point, ...


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How about using a real tftp client? Those two which come to my mind: tftp atftp


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Please download memstick image from here (or you can use amd64 of course). Attach the pendrive and write the img file with dd: dd if=your_img_file.img of=/dev/device_name_of_pendrive bs=512 The device_name_of_pendrive is the device name of pendrive, NOT partition! (e.g. /dev/sdc and not /dev/sdc1 or similar)


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To find out how long it takes for the system to boot, systemd provides systemd-analyze. Without parameters, it will tell you the time to boot. Calling systemd-analyze critical-chain will print a tree of the chain of services that took the longest, while systemd-analyze blame will tell you how long each service took independently. Finally, systemd-analyze ...


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Use systemd-analyze built-in tool. You are especially interested in two options: blame and plot systemd-analyze blame systemd-analyze plot > graph.svg blame: Print list of running units ordered by time to init plot: Output SVG graphic showing service initialization


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CTRL + ALT + F2 Login, type service gdm stop or systemctl stop gdm Type startx Post the results in your question


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This is was an embarrasing layer 8 problem. I was trying to install this iso debian-testing-ia64-DVD-1.iso which has compatibility problems with many motherboards AND is a live CD not a debian installer iso. I downloaded the debian net installer and that solved the issue.


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This is a very interesting FOSS-support problem. UEFI BIOS enabled motherboards tend to be problematic. This really can't be as bad as the Power-VR graphics support issue I solved earlier this year, and I seriously doubt we will be requiring any kernel hacking, as this issue is with GRUB. I am aware that you are requiring dual-boot capabilities. Therefore, ...


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You should build your own Debian image according to the instructions contained in this link: Debian UEFI-BIOS Compatibility I've done this before, following this exact guide. Let me know if you have any questions.


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I'm not sure what this has to do with UEFI, as I've never heard of any Linux distro that won't still boot via BIOS. Just download an ISO image of the distro you wish to install, and use something like Rufus to "burn" it to a USB flash drive.


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CONFIG_EFI_MIXED might be what you need.


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After some chat, I'm posting an answer summing up a few interesting leads to follow while facing such problems. Booting safely on a USB image As you can see here, it seems like your system went into some trouble when trying to boot from the USB drive: ERROR: '/dev/disk/by-label/ARCH_201409' device did not show up after 30 seconds... Falling back to ...


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Turns out I had a typo in the the real_root=ZFS= parameter in grub.cfg. After fixing it, the system boot successfully. So, zfs-0.6.3 does support kernel versions 3.16.y there is a "typo" in the related FAQ


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Yes you cannot use gparted from within a system to resize. There are filesystems that you can resize on the fly like btrfs. You can copy your system to disk and copy it back onto a new partition scheme. Boot into from your bios.


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It's not Arch that you want to tell to not from there, you need to let your BIOS know. Go into your boot settings and set it to boot from USB.


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The initial ramdisk is not traditionally embedded in bzImage, though it can be. Instead it is stored in a second file and specified using the init directive. The method your rootfs.cpio file uses to switch the root is up to whatever generated that file, but traditionally, pivot_root /new_root or switch_root /new_root is used to switch to the new root.


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The bootloader (lilo or GRUB for example) loads the cpio initramfs (unless embedded as a blob in the kernel) or initramd and passes that to the kernel when booting it. It is normally specified with the initrd directive in the bootloader configuration file. If you use initrd you will typically specify the root filesystem device as root=/dev/ram0 on the ...


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According to the website http://sources.debian.net/src/simple-cdd/0.5.0/README/ to preseed these answers, you should pass the --locale parameter to the build-simple-cdd command Language and Country Selection to pre-select the language and country, it is recommended to use the --locale commandline option: build-simple-cdd --locale en_US


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My suspicion is that something in /root/.bashrc (or something being source'd by that file) is causing bash to immediate exit, resulting in the machine booting to the default runlevel. For more details about this suspicion, see the below. Any kernel arguments that are not recognized by the kernel are passed onto init. According to bootparam(7): Any ...


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It only matters if you're going to use the ancient GRUB, ext4 is only supported by GRUB2. ext2 is simple, robust and well-supported, which makes it a good choice for /boot.



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