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0

Besides booting into single user mode you could attach a virtual CD-ROM containing an installation or rescue system image, boot that, mount the root filesystem of the machine and edit the boot scripts. This may be more comfortable to use than using single user mode.


1

Using fdisk to create and format partitions instead of cfdisk solved the problem! Apparently LILO doesn't work with cfdisk.


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Boot into single user mode by going into the Grub menu and select the kernel version and press e to edit press space and type single


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From man fstab: Instead of giving the device explicitly, one may indicate the (ext2 or xfs) filesystem that is to be mounted by its UUID or volume label (cf. e2label(8) or xfs_admin(8)), writing LABEL= or UUID=, e.g., 'LABEL=Boot' or 'UUID=3e6be9de-8139-11d1-9106- a43f08d823a6'. This will make the system more robust: adding or removing a ...


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Extra code is necessary to work around firmware bugs When not chaining grub, the distribution is relying more upon the firmware to correctly boot. As any software will have issues, firmware is also prone to that. Now the Linux distributions will have to write to workaround these firmware bugs too. A real life case as an example. The Asrock H81 pro BTC ...


1

Measured results BIOS - fast boot = 14.15 seconds BIOS + fast boot = 13.08 seconds UEFI - fast boot = 13.01 seconds [1.14 seconds faster] UEFI + fast boot = 11.30 seconds [1.78 seconds faster] UEFI stub + fast boot = 9.84 seconds2 UEFI + ultra fast boot1 = 10.87 seconds 1. no working keyboard during boot -> no access to the firmware setup utility ...


1

I am not familiar with this tool but from looking at the source for the livecd-iso-to-disk.sh script here, I think you've got this backwards. You still need to provide a single source (not a directory) because this tool can only do one ISO at a time, so you need to run it once for every ISO you want to add. Meanwhile, --livedir is supposed to be the name for ...


-1

Please check this best tabular difference http://tabulardifference.com/2014/08/difference-between-lilo-and-grub/


4

If you've booted using the UEFI firmware as opposed to using BIOS firmware then your system should make the EFI NVRAM variables available in: /proc/firmware/efi/vars/ or /proc/firmware/efi/efivars/ When booting using a BIOS (or the BIOS emulation mode of UEFI firmware) then these variables aren't available.


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First method: Ok, I booted up my UEFI box to check. First clue, near the top of dmesg. This shouldn't appear if you're booted via BIOS: [ 0.000000] efi: EFI v2.31 by American Megatrends [ 0.000000] efi: ACPI=0xd8769000 ACPI 2.0=0xd8769000 SMBIOS=0xd96d4a98 [ 0.000000] efi: mem00: type=6, attr=0x800000000000000f, ...


1

If you didn't have an initramfs, you could do it with kernel parameters. Just add a random string as kernel parameter and then use /proc/cmdline as the key for your encryption. If it's not easy to add such parameters to your boot loader, the Linux kernel has a CMDLINE config option that lets you compile it in. (Note: it is possible for kernel parameters to ...


2

Use Win32 Disk Imager on Windows or dd to write the ISO to the USB stick on Linux/OSX. dd if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-NetInstall.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=8m I've recently used the first and it booted fine after doing that.


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This should involve some kind of emulation such as linprocfs that will allow you to run Linux binaries inside FreeBSD. I donĀ“t think that such technology exists, where you will be able to run Linux binaries inside XNU. However, you could give it a try on the PureDarwin software distribution, that is a Darwin compilation and it will allow you to user ...


0

You probably mounted the wrong Windows partition mounted. Look for a small partition of 100 or 300MB (boot Partition of Windows), mount it and then run the command again. If you still are having problems add following to the end of /etc/grub.d/40_custom: menuentry "Windows"{ set root='(hd0,0)' chainloader +1 } This is assuming the Windows boot ...


3

An easy way is to just create a directory in /tmp and use a symlink: mkdir /tmp/mine ln -s /tmp/mine /home/me/tmp You may want to chmod 700 /tmp/mine to keep it private. If you instead want to mount an actual separate tmpfs directory: mount -t tmpfs -o size=100M tmpfs /home/me/tmp You need root privileges to do this, but normal permissions rules apply ...


1

Using the @reboot cron keyword, this will execute the specified command once after the machine got booted every time. @reboot rm -rf /dev/tmp/*


0

If you need simple, easy to set up bootloader, then I recommend LILO. It is less capable than GRUB2, but on home desktop PC it doesn't really matter.


0

Typically, swap is configured in /etc/fstab. It sounds like you have a swap device configured there which doesn't exist. If you intend to have swap, you need to change the UUID to the one that actually exists on your system.


0

Try booting in recovery mode (select via grub). This way you may see more output. There is also a kernel command line option that you can set (I believe you have to make sure quiet is not set). Also you may want to check the journal after boot has finished. It may be the case that systemd is waiting for some devices that are not present (probably because ...


1

Mount the windows Partition. (If you can't mount install ntfsprogs-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm and ntfs-3g-2013.1.13-5.el7.x86_64.rpm) Run as root grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg



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