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I was able to get it running by compiling my SATA controller into my kernel, which was originally being compiled as a module (and which was why it would run fine with an initial ram disk).


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update-grub only updates de grub configurations; you need usually to run grub-install after it. The system is not booting, because grub is thus still pointing to the old kernel and not to the new one. If you have grub in your MBR, it should have been then: sudo update-grub sudo grub-install /dev/sda I thus advise to boot the system/VM from a live system ...


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I found out, how to configure pxelinux for my needs. tftp was already running and working, i made a "tail -f /var/log/messages" to discover that chain.c32 was not working (it was loading, but nothing happened): 2016-06-29T16:15 uaewg-srv xinetd[1536]: START: tftp from=::ffff:172.99.199.9 2016-06-29T16:15 uaewg-srv in.tftpd[2939]: RRQ from ::ffff:172.99.199....


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I've had exactly the same issue today. Digging through boot-repair tool logs I've found this error: gui-actions-purge.sh: line 441: ${APTTYP[$USRPART]} ${INSTALLTYP[$USRPART]} ${YESTYP[$USRPART]} linux${$KERNELTOREINST}-generic linux-headers-generic: bad substitution The logs are stored in the \var\log\boot-sav\log\YYYY-MM-DD__HHhMMboot-repairXX\boot-...


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You wrote: result of execution of ls -l $(type -p su) -rwxr-xr-x root root 157400 2016-04-21 19:11 su There's your problem. su is missing the setuid root bit. The permissions should look like this: -rwsr-xr-x 1 root root 40040 Nov 12 2015 /bin/su There are three possibilities for this situation. The su executable on the server is not setuid (...


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Typically this happens if the NFS share isn't exported properly. By default, the root user is mapped to nobody. This means that when you try and run su (which is suid root) then you will try to access files on the NFS server as user nobody... and this won't let you read /etc/shadow and similar. You didn't say what your NFS server is, but if it's the ...


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In case anyone stumbles across this post and is using Centos 7 / GRUB2 (like I am), the variable name appears to have changed to GRUB_DISABLE_UUID (not GRUB_DISABLE_LINUX_UUID). You can check yours at /usr/share/grub/grub-mkconfig_lib. Mine has this: if [ "x$GRUB_DISABLE_UUID" != "xtrue" ] After a grub2-mkconfig, the UUIDs were replaced with /dev/sda1, ...


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I found a solution to systems error kernel not loading Use live cd to gain access to your existing installation. Once in reinstall Linux kernel : pacman -S Linux Then delete the fstab file from etc/fstab : rm /etc/fstab Now reinstall systemd: pacman -S systemd When reinstalling systemd it will automatically generate a new fstab file Now reinstall ...


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If the root= parameter is correct and the issue is just that the necessary device isn't available (for example because the initramfs failed to assemble an md RAID), then it's enough to make the device available manually, for example: mdadm --assemble ... Then check that the device is there and if everything looks good, hit ctrl + d or type exit to quit ...


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I have found the solution of my problem. When Android starts it makes flush of all rules. The code that does this work I found in file system/netd/RouteController.cpp function int flushRules(). When I blocked execution of code of this function I haven't seen message about NFS connection loose anymore. // Returns 0 on success or negative errno on failure. ...


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You need to use the chain loader (chain.c32) from syslinux. As with the other syslinux modules there are different versions for BIOS, efi32, and efi64. LABEL local MENU DEFAULT MENU LABEL Boot from Local Hard Disk KERNEL /path/to/chain.c32 APPEND hd0 2 That's adapted slightly from my /srv/tftp/default file - my version has KERNEL http://...


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After a lot of web browsing I have not found any solution and I've made a wrapper for pygrub to be used with libvirt/kvm. Maybe this solution is useful for you, even late, so I'd like to share it. It's a libvirt hook script. The script parses the domain configuration on prepare/begin event, lets pygrub find the kernel through the available disks and then ...


3

A potential intruder could reboot into single user mode if they had physical access. Physical security is just as important as software security. That is why schools lock out USB drives and the BIOS. You have to lock it down. In /etc/default/grub you can uncomment the following line GRUB_DISABLE_RECOVERY="true" And poof! Single User mode is now gone.


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Several reasons: one, you have to have physical access to the servers, and most employees don't want to lose their jobs by getting caught on CCTV video breaking into systems. Then, you have some companies that implement BIOS / boot passwords or boot loader passwords. Sometimes, the "single user" option requires a password (if set up properly ahead of time), ...


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normal procedure is mount /dev/sdX /mnt fix problem on /mnt reboot You might want to mount /dev/sdX /mnt fix /mnt umount /mnt mount /dev/sdX / finish boot manualy This is not recommended, you'll have to do it on every boot. In a production environment, you can't be sure manual boot follow same steps as automatic one. However in a emergency with ...


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I believe there are two different things : automatic login and automatic start of programs at startup. Archlinux is based on systemd, and the best in your case is probably to write a systemd unit to start your non-terminating executable at startup, ensuring that its dependencies are started.


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fix from upstream https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/next/linux-next.git/patch/include/linux/usb.h?id=feb26ac31a2a5cb88d86680d9a94916a6343e9e6 ubuntu bug report : https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/1437492


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There is another solution mentioned here: Add FreeBSD to GRUB2 boot menu, which is: menuentry "FreeBSD" --class freebsd --class bsd --class os { insmod ufs2 insmod bsd set root=(hd0,1) kfreebsd /boot/kernel/kernel kfreebsd_loadenv /boot/device.hints set kFreeBSD.vfs.root.mountfrom=ufs:/dev/ada0s1a set kFreeBSD.vfs.root.mountfrom.options=rw set ...


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I'm not an expert, but from the source (ply-text-progress-bar.c) it looks like you set the overall percentage done and that the different colors/layers's progress is hard coded by the following, and other functions within that file: brown_fraction = -(progress_bar->percent_done * progress_bar->percent_done) + 2 * progress_bar->percent_done; ...


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You can mask the service to make it imossible to start, using the following command: systemctl mask unit To get the exact bluetooth service , run systemd-analyze blame and replace it Edit The openvas-manager take 1m 31.246s, the right command will be: systemctl mask openvas-manager.service If you need to re-enable it you can unmask , enable and start ...


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Seems like a firmware bug. I finally worked around it by: Deleting the Microsoft directory in /boot/efi/EFI and replacing it with the contents of the Fedora directory (note: this assumes you don't want to dual boot with Windows, which I don't). Copying the grub .efi file into where the firmware expected to find the Windows boot loader. Note: The above ...


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I directly modify the file /etc/system/getty.target.wants which is a symlink to /lib/systemd/system/getty@service; I changed the line ExecStart=-/sbin/agetty --noclear %I $TERM into ExecStart=-/sbin/agetty -a *username* %I $TERM And rebooting the system I was automatically logged in.


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This is to be expected (MD5sum being different on bootup when using Puppy on a usb drive). assuming your using a multisession flag. This url may help understand if this is in fact to be expected based on the way you are using Puppy linux. Hope this helps at least point you in the right direction.


1

Use the command line: $ sudo rm /boot/.Trash-1000/* would empty all the files from the trash. The 1000 refers to your UID so may differ. It will begin with .Trash- though. There are two directories within this one - one called files where your deleted files reside and another called info which stores small text files containing the original filename ...


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I suppose it's true that modern hardware wouldn't mind e.g. a 50MB kernel. You could argue that loading everything as separate modules has not been as important for a while now. However the initial ram system allows bootstrapping of any possible configuration, without needing any special handling in the kernel. Writing kernel code is a Big Deal. The ...


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There are many reason to have an initramfs, some are below. When you need have a separate /usr,/var as some distros depends on having these directories in / When you want to encrypt / but you like to have /boot on a usb stick since you can't have an encrypted /boot When you don't want to have stuff in kernel builtin but instead as module, that way you only ...


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The strength comes from all the other things you can do besides loading modules. Basically it gives you a userspace and the possibility of doing all the things you can do from that. An example: I use an initrd to have an encrypted root fs, setting that up requires code that there's no point having in kernel. The "Rationale" section of the Wikipedia page on ...


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Might be a missing "active partition" within DOS Partition Table, just ran into that with E5450 and Linux -- fire up fdisk and check/set.


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To make this permanent, you'll want to update /etc/default/grub to point to the correct swap partition. Example: Change this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rd.lvm.lv=rootVG/root rd.lvm.lv=oldnameVG/swapLV rhgb quiet" To this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="rd.lvm.lv=rootVG/root rd.lvm.lv=rootVG/swapLV rhgb quiet" When that is completed, you 'll want to regenerate the grub ...


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The instructions are already documented by Debian. Edit: If you experience problems with the wired network card, and the card is Realtek, the following could be useful: $ apt-get update && apt-get install firmware-realtek


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You would have to use a systemd service to run your application during boot process. Create a new file in /etc/systemd/system (e.g. myscript.service) and add the following contents: [Unit] Description=My script [Service] ExecStart=/usr/bin/my-script [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target put your script in /usr/bin/my-script and make sure to make it ...


2

You can add the applications you want to automatically start when booting the system by adding them to Startup Applications in the tweak-tool - open the Tweak Tool from Activities launcher : Alternatively copy a .desktop file from /usr/share/applications/ to ~/.config/autostart/.


3

Archemar is correct, you don't need NFS for PXE, it's just convenient for diskless installations. Nfs can be used for diskless setups, where the root filesystem is mounted from a common nfs store. An example using RHEL: After creating a root filesystem (either using rsync or with yum installroot) and exporting it, In your tftpboot/pxelinux.cfg use label ...


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You don't need NFS to use PXE booting. PXE booting consist of an IP (usualy given by DHCP server), and downloading kernel (usualy via TFTP), kernel then is loaded into memory. At this point, either the host has local disks, or not. Obviously, if you don't have local disks, you'll need some way to share resources. This is where NFS comes into play. Note ...


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I had the same problem too. I installed kali linux in 10 GB hard drive and i had windows 10 installed too. the first time i booted kali, i had no problem but after a little work, root hard drive had 9.8 GB Data. after restarting it freezed in a black page and asked for kali login and password and didn't boot, so i increased hard drive space to 20 GB and ...


1

Because dd will copy the contents of the iso image along with partition table inside it, so having the USB device mounted is not recommended and backing up the contents of the USB device is because the dd command with wipe all data in it. If you have a USB stick with grub as the boot loader you can actually boot from an iso so that you don't have to wipe ...


0

You need to install the dnfplugin system upgrade package, From the terminal type the following command : sudo dnf install dnf-plugin-system-upgrade --enablerepo=updates-testing then download the updated packages: sudo dnf system-upgrade download --releasever=23 --allowerasing The --allowerasing will erase packages which dependencies cannot be satisfied....


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The fedup is obsoleted since Fedora 22, the DNF system upgrade should be used to update from Fedora 22 to Fedora 23.


0

The point of hibernation is to power down the hardware. It does not really help you run multiple operating systems on the same hardware. You can do that, but only if the OSes are completely independent (or close enough. If you have a single OS, you need to be careful not to hibernate a deleted kernel. It's best not to do kernel upgrades until you're ready ...


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You need to add noauto option to the /boot line of your etc/fstab, so the system would not try to mount it each time it boots. You need to mount the /boot partition before system updates as the lack of files in their places according to the package manager database may disrupt the booting. For example, updates to grub2 and kernel packages usually trigger ...


2

I do think the shared filesystem situation is kind of evil :(. It is mitigated by a patchwork of different measures, but there are undoubtedly plenty of holes you can fall through. The shared partition case is kind of nice in that once you know it's horribly dangerous, you can "just" avoid setting the system up that way. Despite how useful it would be if ...


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I solved this by doing the following: enter sudo gedit /etc/default/grub in terminal and edit/uncomment the line "GRUB_GFXMODE" so that it's GRUB_GFXMODE=640x480


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I thought that maybe as "@steeldriver" user said, the network couldn't have been ready yet when the system booted, hence I edited and added "sleep 120" before the command. Now it is "@reboot sleep 120; /path/to/my/script.sh > /home/myuser/itworks.txt 2>&1". It simply works, it creates the file itworks.txt and if you "cat" it, you'll get all the info.


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You may invoke crontab as root, crontab -e and then insert this line @reboot /home/myuser/bin/command.sh where command.sh is the executable file note: chmod 755 command.sh


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My /boot/loader/entries/arch.conf should have been title Arch Linux linux /vmlinuz-linux initrd /initramfs-linux.img options initrd=initramfs-linux.img root=PARTUUID={/dev/sda2 uuid} rw (replace {/dev/sda2 uuid} with the actual UUID)


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The LinkDelay seems to have solved the problem.


2

The escape sequences used by systemd are hardcoded in the program, like this: #define WHITE_ON_BLACK "\033[40;37;1m" #define NORMAL "\033[0m" static void print_border(FILE *output, unsigned width) { unsigned x, y; /* Four rows of border */ for (y = 0; y < 4; y += 2) { fputs(WHITE_ON_BLACK, output); and making ...



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