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A few things: 1) Doesn't the x11 option require that the program is launched while an xserver is running? 2) Apart from this you could try cron, using the @reboot directive. 3) You might also use the screen utility to daemonize your script. 4) Further you might use sudo -u underprivileged-user ... to prevent running the program as root.


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So, the reason was that I had compiled the kernel like so: make oldconfig make -j6 sudo make install I was wondering why my previous (official ubuntu repo) initrd was 28m in size while the new one was 8m. I had not installed the modules! Doing sudo make INSTALL_MOD_STRIP=1 modules_install sudo make install fixed it. Now the HD crypto is initialized ...


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The solution: installed grub on the second disk and changed the order of boot device.


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Probably SELinux is preventing from startup. Mine too was not starting . And here's what I did to solve my problem : Selected 2 option (rescue mode) and press e ; Added 3 in front of .....rhb quiet (Like this : rhb quiet "3") and press Ctrl+x Then I logged in as root in virtual terminal and typed startx and pressed Enter Then I was logged in graphically ...


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Reinstall the CentOS bootloader (whether it is LILO or GRUB). The bootloader installer should recognize OSes in your machine and automatically show you OS choices in booting time. CMIIW.


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The easiest way would be to take your WiFi config out of /etc/network/interfaces or similar and switch to Network Manager. Even if you set the connection to a system connection, it should be brought up in the background. This also gives you much easier WiFi connection management, at least for laptops that may be moving between networks. You could also take ...


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Try this perhaps it might help: http://www.fclose.com/2218/configuration-of-linux-kernel-video-mode/ http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/KernelModeSetting https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/kernel_mode_setting


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I'd start with taking a look at the setup of your system, specifically the contents of the file, /etc/fstab. In there it will show you what partitions are being mounted and how they're being mounted. It's likely the case that with the addition of this new device that it's throwing the device handles off slightly, causing your system not to be able to access ...


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I didn't find the cause of the slow booting with GRUB 2. I ended up using EXTLINUX instead, which is compact and fast, and better-suited if you don't need all the fancy GRUB 2 things. http://www.syslinux.org/wiki/index.php/EXTLINUX


2

I've just had to deal with this on a laptop running Debian Testing (Jessie/Sid). Possibly relevant: swap partition on an LVM volume (non-encrypted) at /dev/vg1/swap. To make the system resume after hibernation, I had to edit /etc/default/grub and change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="resume=/dev/mapper/vg1-swap" and then run ...


2

I would guess that this has much to do with the way bootloader and kernel are glued. Section 5.1.3 (Bootstrap Loader) in Hallinan's Embedded Linux Primer has the following to say on this : Some bootstrap loaders perform checksum veriļ¬cation of the kernel image, and most decompress and relocate the kernel image. The difference between a bootloader and a ...


1

I don't think there's a way of bypassing GRUB2 (or any other Linux bootloader) via EasyBCD. Most probably EasyBCD is not a universal bootloader and it works by chain loading into GRUB2. Your best bet is to try and make GRUB2 timeout on the Ubuntu entry immediately as Jonyburd's answer is suggesting. I believe you should look into why it failed.


2

Try changing the values that are in etc/default/grub to look like these: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" Then run sudo update-grub.


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Just in case anyone else ever has to the same thing I did here, I'll answer my own question. 1) Get the binary DVD iso image from redhat.com 2) Remove unnecessary rpms (GNOME, eclipse) so that it is less than 4GB (this allows it to be stored on a FAT32 filesystem) -copy this iso onto a USB 3) Remove the iso image that comes with the previous bootable USB ...


3

As the kernel documentation states, /dev/nfs is not a real device but only a hint to the kernel to use NFS as rootfs. You'll also have to tell the kernel where to find this root through the nfsroot parameter or a properly set up DHCP daemon. For the latter one to work you'll also have to either configure your kernel to auto-configure its network ...


1

You can make a partition bootable with out making an other changes. Also you may try re-installing grub on the hard disk, which should not hurt the partitions either.


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


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As @Leiaz very correctly pointed out in the comments, /sbin in Arch (and by extension, Manjaro) is now a symlink to /usr/bin. This means that unless /usr is mounted, /usr/sbin/init will not exist. You therefore need to make sure that /usr is mounted by the initial ramdisk. That's what the Arch wiki quote in your OP means: If you keep /usr as a separate ...


2

From Mint, you can change root to your Manjaro installation, in order to regenerate initramfs. Mount your Manjaro root under the directory of your choice ( ~/foo). Mount your /usr partition at ~/foo/usr, also mount boot if it is separate. Mount proc sys dev : # mount -t proc proc ~/foo/proc/ # mount --rbind /sys ~/foo/sys/ # mount --rbind /dev ~/foo/dev/ ...


0

You didn't say which distro of Linux you have installed, but I'll make a bad assumption here the since you have a flash drive with Ubuntu, you are running Ubuntu. Also, make sure you have a back up. You can still get to your files by mounting the drive. I explain how to mount below, or you can look at man pages. There is a program called boot repair. Open ...


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This kind of functionality is far too advanced for GRUB. GRUB can't even talk over the network except for TFTP. The SSH server that you saw runs under Linux. It is started early during the boot process, after the kernel has booted but before mounting the root filesystem. Linux runs programs from the initramfs (or initrd on older systems) before mounting the ...



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