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2

Before there was such a thing as an initrd, you had to pass the device name of the partition you wanted to use as your root fs on the kernel command line. The kernel had special one off code to parse this name and recognize a handful of common strings, and translate them to their well known dev_t number. That is to say, that internally the kernel knows ...


3

Why not only use what's on the disk ? You can. You do not have to use an initrd (or an initramfs, the newer and more widespread version since kernel 2.6.13). The reason that they are used is that distro kernels are generic and must support a wide range of hardware out of the box. Some of the drivers for different hardware, crucial to mounting a root ...


1

chaos perfectly summarized it. I'd just add that an initial ramdisk (or initrd) is optional. There are certain circumstances it is required, for instance when /usr lies on a separate filesystem, which used to be advertised as a good practice. Also, systemd, which is found on many Linux distributions, requires /usr to be available at boot. Otherwise you have ...


1

The task of the initrd is to make the real root device available and switch into it. The real root device can be (for example) a partition on a hard drive, a nfs share in the network, a filesystem at an USB-stick, a pseudo-filesystem or something else. Nearly every initrd has a routine called mountroot. That's the function that searches for the correct root ...


0

I wrote an Ansible role which does this for you. Just get the role ypid.cryptsetup_remote_unlock and run. - hosts: localhost remote_user: root vars: # cryptsetup_remote_network_ip_line: "{{ ansible_default_ipv4.address }}:::{{ ansible_default_ipv4.netmask }}:{{ ansible_hostname }}::off" roles: - ypid.cryptsetup_remote_unlock


0

jasonwryan pointed me in the right direction. I performed the following steps: 1) downloaded latest installation media and made a bootable USB 2) unencrypted my LUKS LVM volumes 3) mounted my volume to the live USB file system in /mnt/arch, a directory I created (including /mnt/arch/boot, and /mnt/arch/home) 4) connected to the internet with wifi-menu ...


-1

You can disable it by editing /etc/X11/default-display-manager and replacing gdm with 'true' or some other dummy command. Source (since Kali is based of debian ;) ): Disabling graphical login in Debian wheezy


0

After a lot of troubleshooting and help from @Anthon Anthon, I finally managed to achieve what I wanted. The problem after all was that X server did not have enough time to load. The Xserver was started from lightdm that was an upstart service, and my script started from init.d. It seems that if a monitor is connected X server starts earlier and my script ...


0

You can have any application run with a virtual X frame buffer using tools like Xvfb or Xvnc. You should also consider switching to using a language that doesn't force you to have a running X to connect to. That things work if you use ssh to connect to the machine is not a surprise. Try making the connection after first entering unset DISPLAY, or by doing ...


1

As you indicate yourself, as root you can just write things to /dev/tty1. If your script does write to stdout you can use: yourscript | tee -a /your/log/file > /dev/tty1 if the script directly writes to the log file things are not so easy, you would have to follow the log file and display new content. In that case it is probably easier to change the ...


0

I have read rave reviews of Mint but have never got on with it - suffice to say my user name was "is-mint-pants?" and my password was "mintispants" (and you must remember that in the UK what the Americans call "pants" we call "trousers"; "pants", over here, are an undergarment worn to protect the "fundamental" areas of the trousers' groin & buttock from ...


2

It depends on whether the BIOS/UEFI of your computer supports this feature. If it does, you can use the Ubuntu package nvram-wakeup to set the wakeup date/time. Read the documentation of the package before using it (/usr/share/doc/nvram-wakeup/README.mb.gz) as it is possible that you need to do some work to configure the tool.


18

One option is to not shutdown, but to hibernate or suspend the system and then automatically wake it up using rtcwake utility. For example rtcwake -s 3600 -m disk will immediately hibernate (suspend to disk) the system and resume it in 1 hour sleep 600; rtcwake -s 60 -m mem will suspend to ram in 10 minutes from now and then resume in 60 seconds You ...


4

As far as I know, automatic boot is a feature that has to be provided and set up in your BIOS or UEFI and is independent from the OS (like Ubuntu) installed. Look at the manual of your BIOS/UEFI or mainboard.


14

Check out the Wake-on-LAN (WoL) feature. Arch Linux has nice documentation on using it, and do not worry; it is Linux general. In Ubuntu you have the wakeonlan package to send magic packets to your machine. Here is Ubuntu documentation on using WoL. So to turn your machine automatically, you will have to use another machine that will turn it on with WoL.


3

I can't say that my own 19 year experience of running Linux supports your assertion that windows boots more stably, but here are some things that will effect what you are seeing: Filesystem caching Linux uses caching on all filesystems unless told otherwise. This improves speed and response times for disk reads and writes by userspace programs, as they ...


0

Turned out that the IPNHost program was dependent on intel ipp libraries environment variables for which the location was not specified at that point of time during boot. Did a script autoStart.sh #!/bin/bash source /opt/intel/bin/compilervars.sh intel64 cd /root/IPNHost ./IPNHost The source /opt/intel/bin/compilervars.sh intel64 loads the required ...


1

If you are using centOS 7 you also have to enable the rc-local service in systemd.


0

Update for RedHat/CentOS 7 that has switched from sysvinit to systemd. To switch from GUI to CLI: systemctl isolate multi-user.target To switch from CLI to GUI: systemctl isolate graphical.target To set the CLI as a default runlevel (target in systemd terminology): systemctl set-default multi-user.target. Analogously for GUI: systemctl set-default ...


0

The oracle-linux 7 installation by defaults takes minimal installation option . You must change it to installation with GUI mode at the time of installation .This has solved my issue on not able to use the graphical user mode .


0

A 32-bit grub bootloader will boot a 64-bit Linux image compiled with the CONFIG_EFI_MIXED option using the "linux" and "initrd" commands. Note that these Grub commands execute EFI's ExitBootServices() prior to starting the kernel. Thus the kernel cannot use secure boot nor can it access the ROMs of PCI slots (most notably the BIOS of the graphics' card). ...


0

Well this was better a VirtualBox and Windows issue. I had an other Win7 virtual machine, I added a virtual disk. I copied the necessary files according to http://www.instructables.com/id/Install-Windows-7-without-USB-or-DVD-without-upgra/ and made it bootable. Then I created a new virtual machine whose sole disk was this newly created bootable drive. ...


1

Usually daemons double or triple fork and the parents exit. When a daemon is started in bg, the non-interactive shell doesn't wait for the first fork to exit. And because it's got nothing to do it just exits immediately. This may speed up a bit. I don't think of any bad consequences of this if you are sure that the daemon won't fail. To do away with a ...



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