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The GRUB banner is printed before configuration files are read, so the only way to get rid of them is patching the source or the binaries. There is prior art in this field, though, if you really mean it. Syslinux behaves the same in this respect. The boot loader banner is often used as a "progress bar": different parts of it are printed by different stages ...


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To boot Ubuntu server I'm using a menuentry like so: menuentry "Ubuntu server installer" { set isofile=/isos/ubuntu-15.04-server-amd64.iso loopback isoloop $isofile set gfxpayload=keep linux (isoloop)/install/vmlinuz file=/cdrom/preseed/ubuntu-server.seed iso-scan/filename=$isofile quiet noeject -- initrd (isoloop)/install/initrd.gz } ...


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As stated in : https://en.opensuse.org/HCL:Raspberry_Pi2 As root extract the image onto your SD-Card (replace sdX with the device name of your SD-Card). WARNING: all previous data on the SD-Card will be lost. I had the same problem sudo simply won't work you must login as root and it will work !


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On arch linux, there is an AUR package dropbear_initrd_encrypt that does what you want out of the box. Works pretty well for wired interfaces. I had to hack it up slightly for wireless.


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It seems impossible to copy base packages from boot media to RAM to build an alternative APT repository for installation with current Debian Installer. But you might be able to eject the media after boot and continue installation using "netboot" image which would download everything from the internet, not out of boot media. You can remove it permanently ...


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The /boot directory in the root is simply the place where your boot partition gets mounted, which means the files in that partition appear in /boot. These days about the only reason to have a /boot partition is if you want to encrypt your root partition. In the late '90s it was often needed to work around BIOS limitations on hard disk size: the BIOS could ...


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For Debian 8 (jessie), you need different options to find the iso image (the option you specified are valid for Ubuntu). Change your grub entry as follows: linux (loop)/install.amd/vmlinuz findiso=$isofile


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Assuming that your Kali Linux install uses ext4 (or an older version, which will work even better), you may also be interested in installing ext4 drivers for your windows 7 installation, so you can access your files from within windows. I've used them with reasonable success (I run Windows 7 and Arch Linux). To be safe I would disable writing the your ext4 ...


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use a live-cd (ubuntu/fedora) and acess your Linux partitions, copy the files/data from there to your windows partitions. First priority is to save the Data. copy to an external disk/usb pendrive, then Later fix the grub issue with grub restore/rescue process.


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You will need to chroot (change root) to the installed system once you're booted from the live cd/usb. Excellent instructions on creating the chroot environment are here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1581099 I've used these instructions quite a few times - please read and understand each step before starting - pay particular attention to the ...


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Try installing Fedora first and then Debian. Debian usually plays well with others, as long as it the last kid picked.


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I noticed that what happened was I install the boot sequence (or whatever it is called) on sdb1 or something similar and not on sda where the boot flag was set. So what I did was I booted linux from a live USB and re installed my linux mint, and put the boot sequence to be installed on sda and set the boot flag there through gdisk. After that I installed ...


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The /dev/kmsg represeted by the kmsg_fops structure which has file_operations type that represents standard operations with a file: const struct file_operations kmsg_fops = { .open = devkmsg_open, .read = devkmsg_read, .write_iter = devkmsg_write, .llseek = devkmsg_llseek, .poll = devkmsg_poll, .release = devkmsg_release, }; You ...


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Ok, I figured that out by myself. ZFS Loader doesn't allow to set a root pool to boot from, but it tries to guess the correct one by pooling the BIOS for the boot priority order. To make it boot from the correct pool, I set as first booting device in the BIOS the drive containing the bootloader, and as second and third the drives belonging to the root ...


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I'm reposting Part of Another Answer here in hopes that it will help you, instead of telling you to use a VM... If doing this helps, I'll readd Part 2 with some explanation that fits here. BTW, these screenshots are from my Personal Laptop, that I used this method with to keep Windows Update from bonking my non-refind EFI, discussed in the question I asked ...


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Is /sbin/init owned by root, or by some other user instead ? Likely its owned by a non-root user, along with files like /bin/mount. Which means when they run (they have the SUID bit set) they run as non-root. Example below. See how mount and mount.steve have the same contents but mount.steve is owned by steve. So mount.steve fails with the "only root ...


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Which version of Debian, and which init system are you using? With new systemd, use journalctl -b or follow this instruction. With old traditional sysvinit, you can use bootlogd to log all the output from init scripts. I can see that message in /etc/init.d/udev, which would be run by sysvinit boot. # wait for the udevd childs to finish ...


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I didn't bother researching how to import missing modules and such. That's a pretty steep learning curve for my taste, as I am only starting to use GNU/Linux. Instead, I formatted the UFD with ext4 using a healthy Ubuntu installation on another PC. I was then able to mount it on the patient PC, and from there I only had to copy the file. In terminal on the ...



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