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I doubt this will help, but here's what I've done to dual-boot Qubes and Mint. This is a direct crib from Micah Lee's blog, so I take no credit for it. (https://micahflee.com/2014/04/dual-booting-qubes-and-ubuntu-with-encrypted-disks/) I booted from a Mint live DVD for the initial hdd partitioning. Create three partitions on the HDD: one for Qubes and ...


1

Start another Linux VM, and mount that disk to repair the problem. In addition, to avoid the password entered in single user mode, change as follows /lib/systemd/system/rescue.service. --- /lib/systemd/system/rescue.service.orig 2015-11-20 13:49:03.000000000 +0900 +++ /lib/systemd/system/rescue.service 2016-04-11 15:58:31.002000000 +0900 @@ -18,11 ...


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I had to copy the modules from Qubes and regenerate the initramfs using the sudo dracut -f command.


2

This is caused by a bug in the SELinux policy. See https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1331668 — as of May 2, 2016, there is an update in testing which should resolve the issue. In the meantime, booting with enforcing=0 will work around the problem.


0

Solution for all Corsair mechanical keyboards with usbhid quirks. sudo nano /etc/default/grub or any other editor you like to use instead of nano. you will see this line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" make sure to put the usbhid.quircks between the quotes and save that. In my case I had to change it to this line ...


1

For the sake of completeness, i will add that this is a problem with selinux-policy and selinux-policy-targeted version 3.13.1-183.fc24. Downgrading these to previous versions or using 3.13.1-184.fc24 fixes this issue. Also see bugzilla entries here and here.


2

The solution I used was Change default.target to multi-user.target (Was graphical.) setenforce 0 systemctl isolate graphical


5

This worked for me. Add the following to your kernel parameter. selinux=1 enforcing=0 This sets the SELinux enforcement mode from strict to permissive. This is a temporary solution until I figure out what is going on, or until an update fixes the problem. Hope it helps.


0

Found that adding File 11_windows in /etc/grub.d was more helpful: Contents: #!/bin/sh cat << EOF menuentry "WINDOWS"{ set root='(hd0,msdos1)' chainloader +1 } EOF Then ran grub2-mkconfig after saving backup of grub.cfg in /boot/grub2. Results included added Entry "WINDOWS" in grub menu during start up. My case was for Windows10, but should be ...


1

I also have an N2600 with similar symptoms. But for my, anything after 3.16 would see this problem, but 3.16 and below was fine. I've found that acpi=off gets stuff working again. Clearly there is some kind of issues with timers or CPU sleep states that needs to be addressed.


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You need to mount your root into which you will switch. I assume you already know how to do that. Basically it's just mkdir /newroot; mount -r /dev/something /newroot Then you need to replace your currently running fallback shell. It's running with PID 1 (you can verify that with echo $$), and target init needs to get this number again. So you need an exec ...


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You should be able to create it with dd on a Mac. I have done this successfully with an Arch Linux ISO. Make sure the output destination is the USB device, not a partition on the device.


0

The system is probing for hardware, that is no longer installed in this setup. After a timeout the system starts all network related processes. Solution is to change probing for hardware.


0

I had the same symptom, after moving a F23 installation (ssd) to a different motherboard+chipset. The solution was to change the Secure Boot settings in BIOS. It was set to "Windows 7," and I set it to "Other OS." I guess the first motherboard had this setting by default. I became aware that this may be the issue when I tried to reinstall the Nvidia driver ...


1

im not sure about grub legacy but in grub 2 which im using ive added 'insmod progress' to grub. that give me indication and progress.


0

In dracut emergency shell: Dracut offers a shell for interactive debugging in the event dracut fails to locate your root filesystem. To enable the shell: Add the boot parameter ''rd.shell'' to your bootloader configuration file (e.g. /etc/grub.conf) rhgb = redhat graphical boot - This is a GUI mode booting screen with most of the information hidden ...


2

efivar version 0.23 needs a patch to work with kernel headers from 4.4 (and later kernels), because the header defining NVME_IOCTL_ID changed (it was renamed from nvme.h to nvme_ioctl.h). To build efivar on your system, you'll need the "Workaround rename of linux/nvme.h" patch. To apply that, go into the directory containing the efivar source code (with the ...


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The sda2 partition was most likely the physical volume that made up your LVM's logical volumes 'root' and 'swap'. You might be able to recover the LVM metadata with https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Logical_Volume_Manager_Administration/mdatarecover.html


0

You probably want to use a single user mode. The way to invoke it depends on your exact distro. Very often it consists of just adding some boot-time option ("1" or "single"). This can be done from your bootloader. In Grub just highlight the kernel you want to use, press 'e', go down to line starting with 'linux' and add the boot-time option to the end of ...


0

Linux doesn't identify drives or partitions using drive letters like some versions of Microsoft DOS and Microsoft Windows. Linux uses device names in a hierarchy. Device Boot Start End Blocks Id Systems /dev/sda1 * 2048 308457471 154227712 83 Linux /dev/sda2 308459518 312580095 2060289 5 ...


0

what is your hard disk size? are you sure you didn't erased your other partitions through installation when making new partitions? it seems that there is no other partitions on the disk so you should try recovery tools like this: https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/precise/testdisk/


2

Yes, it'll remain on the login screen indefinitely unless it's set otherwise (I've never seen anything else happen). If you have the sshd configured to start at boot, which I think is almost always the case by default, you shouldn't have to manually start it.


1

Suppose you want Mint on /dev/sda, and Ubuntu on /dev/sdb. Only one OS needs the grub installer, preferably Mint on the boot disk. After you install Ubuntu, rerun sudo update-grub on Mint, and grub will detect and make menu entries for both OSes. But even if you installed Mint, then Ubuntu, and used the grub installer on both, it should still work OK.


2

The root filesystem is passed to the kernel upon boot using the root argument. So you should be able to: cat /proc/cmdline and then look for root=/some/path, or perhaps root=UUID=longstring. For instance, I get: BOOT_IMAGE=/boot/kernel-genkernel-x86_64-4.4.0-sabayon root=UUID=18f3b5a1-3994-43ef-ad6d-cb4c86ff5f95 ro quiet splash If it's a path, it ...


1

UUIDs solved my problem, which was the same as your problem. The following excerpt from the Arch Wiki is very helpful: If your machine has more than one SATA, SCSI or IDE disk controller, the order in which their corresponding device nodes are added is arbitrary. This may result in device names like /dev/sda and /dev/sdb switching around on each boot, ...


2

You can use the other command line options of systemd-analyze to get a better overview about what delays your boot. Your command showed that most of the time is eaten up by userspace processes. Therefore I recommend investigating this further. Take a look at systemd-analyze blame and systemd-analyze plot The first one will give you a per process list ...


0

Kept at it and figured it out, relatively straight forward from here, but not just a matter of setting up /etc/fstab, here is the rest: not necessary but a good idea to clean things up apt-get autoclean set up /etc/fstab - check with mount to ensure you are on the right filesystem type echo "/dev/sda1 / ext4 defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1" > ...


0

You should not add but replace the --users with the --unrestricted: sudo vim /etc/grub.d/10_linux +127 echo "menuentry '$(echo "$title" | grub_quote)' ${CLASS} --unrestricted '' \$menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-$version-$type-$boot_device_id' {" | sed "s/^/$submenu_indentation/" else echo "menuentry '$(echo "$os" | grub_quote)' ${CLASS} ...


0

I am also facing similar problem with Renesar Rz/A1H. My bootargs are console=ttySC3,115200 console=tty0 ignore_loglevel root=/dev/mtdblock0 earlyprintk when I try to boot, ill get the error message "Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs on unknown-block(31,0)"



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