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0

As you already mentioned you're using W8.1 Some things you might have a look at: SecureBoot AHCI General Problems / Usage for (Linux)/Ubuntu with newer hardware-> UEFI Troubleshooting


0

First, try to run update-grub If that does not work - try: gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub should show something like: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 You can change GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 to however long you want grub to showup. Then, save the file and run update-grub again


3

The problem here is that by default Arch boots up with kernel modesetting for the display (and console), using the open source nouveau driver. It seems that the driver included in this kernel doesn't support your graphics chipset, and rather than fallback, it simply gives you no console display. To disable kernel modesetting you can edit the boot options in ...


0

You might try adding -term xterm to the "setterm" line in your .profile So, for example, setterm -blength 0 goes to: setterm -term xterm -blength 0


0

The issue I'm having is that I can get to the first screen and I tried all of the options but after the OS is loaded it goes to a black screen.. And the desktop never shows. I let it sit there all day and I still got nothing.. The tools I used to put Kali on a USB drive is called Rufus 1.4.1 I'm using an HP laptop running Windows 8 that was updated to ...


0

If you can access the U-Boot command line console, you can enter printenv to see U-Boot's environment variables. Some of these variables define the commands that are run at boot time - beginning with bootcmd. Based on the output you've provided, it appears U-Boot is trying different load commands for different filesystems - for example, ext2load vs ...


3

I'm assuming you are using a Debian/Ubuntu based system as they do not automatically remove older kernels, whereas Fedora and family do. List all your installed kernels with: dpkg -l | grep linux-image You'll get a list of all packages. Decide which ones you want to keep and remove the others: sudo apt-get autoremove linux-image-a.b.c linux-image-x.y.z ...


1

Maybe I can help you. Instead of pressing the enter-key on "install elementary" press the e-key to edit the code. When the code comes up you will see a line of code that has the words "quiet splash" written. On the end of that line write: nomodeset xforcevesa , and then press the f10-key.


0

Yes, you have a 32bit processor form the error. Two things come to mind when looking at this: Are you sure you downloaded a 32-bit ISO? run an md5sum on the image and on /dev/srX (where X is a number that represents your CD drive) or on your /dev/sdXY (where X is the letter that represents your USB stick and Y represents the partition). If they don't ...


0

Be careful, in your grub.conf, the root option should be your actual root partition, not the /boot/efi. So ensure the grub.conf contains the line root (hd0,8) as it was originally. As your BIOS let you choose CentOS, it means the /boot/efi partition was correctly mounted when you upgraded grub. So now, the only missing step is to tell your BIOS to boot ...


2

I realize this is an old question, but I've been looking for the same answer myself and thought I would post at least some variety of answer for others that may be asking the same question. failsafe.conf is a file that describes a particular job for the 'upstart' system initialization package in Ubuntu. Each .conf file in /etc/init explicitly defines an ...


0

U-Boot is doing exactly what it should (silencing the output) with the following command: #define CONFIG_EXTRA_ENV_SETTINGS \ "silent=1\0" \ seems like this happens only on my system.


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ssh exited with error status 255 usually points out authentication or connectivity issues. Try running your autossh without -f option so you can see its output: autossh -M 0 -N -o \"ServerAliveInterval 60\" -o \"ServerAliveCountMax 3\" -R 11111:localhost:22222 -i /home/username/.ssh/id_rsa -p 3333 user@server_ip Out of autossh manual: Note that there ...


-1

chainload-syslinux can help you - it has some examples


0

It might be the case that the init script is running under a different user context than when you try it manually. If the init script is running with different userid, then check if the private key file can be read correctly. There are known configuration issues on key files and their permissions. The user who is executing the ssh command needs access to ...


0

The first one is EINVAL (a standard POSIX C error) inverted. If you are curious it's from line 4218 in [src]/drivers/usb/core/hub.c (v. 3.19): 4217 if (udev->state != USB_STATE_DEFAULT) 4218 return -EINVAL; The other one is from the hub_port_init() function in the same file. These kinds of error messages aren't really intended to provide ...


0

At first I thought it's a bug in grub2. Some BIOS seem to test if at least one partition is marked as bootable. After a long research I noticed that, because there was no way to boot from hdd or usb-stick at all. That means even if magic bytes at the end of mbr are correct and boot-code in mbr is valid, BIOS will ignore that device and skip it in ...


0

If you have network shares configured in your /etc/fstab they might prevent the system from booting if they cannot be mounted.


0

Generally, I have found the PXE boot option only exists on a system BIOS boot selection menu. Once you get into grub it is basically too late. On Dell machines, it looks to be possible to program this action remotely (and programatically) depending on the hardware you have installed. Especially using the Dell iDRAC. This capability might be possible on ...


0

I don't know if it could help but I just created the file /etc/sysconfig/network with NETWORKING=yes HOSTNAME=myhostname.mydomain NETWORKING_IPV6=yes And it seems that now my scripts in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-* seem to work.


2

I would recommend using bootchart to see what is causing the delay and then once you know that you can make changes to boot as fast as possible. Below is my boot chart, from powered off to on in mere seconds. This is with a full Ubuntu 14.04 install. But you must first figure out what is causing the delay before we can help you to make it faster. Here is ...


1

If you have the root@(none) prompt, then you're pretty close to recovery: you have a root shell. The hardest part of recovery is usually figuring out what is wrong, but if you have backups of the correct files, that should be easy. The first thing you should do is mount a couple of filesystems. Depending on exactly what you need to do, they may or may not ...


2

instead of choosing automatic recovery, select an emergency shell, then try: $ e2fsck -fy /dev/sda1 $ e2fsck -fy /dev/sda3 $ e2fsck -fy /dev/sda7 This will check the filesystems, option -f forces the checking to continue even if the filesystem seems clean and option -y forces a 'yes' answer to any interactive questions. If you are happy to sit and watch ...


0

adding nomodeset to grub is the way to go


0

Text mode to Graphical Mode: I have recently faced a problem with my kali linux, The problem is that i can't get into graphical mode, When ever i reboot my kali its starts in terminal mode(tty3) and asked root password when i typed password it still shows me text. i tried many things to get into graphical mode. Typing Startx to enter into graphical mode ...


0

For newer versions of ubuntu, for example, 14.04, I found a combination of @dragly and this blogposts' answers very helpful. To paraphrase: (On server) Install Dropbear sudo apt-get install dropbear (On server) Copy and assign permissions for root public/private key login sudo cp /etc/initramfs-tools/root/.ssh/id_rsa ~/. sudo chown user:user ...


0

You don't appear to be setting the hostname after rewriting /etc/hostname. This should do the trick, added after the two sed lines: hostname "$new" If you're using DHCP and this hasn't resolved the problem, take a look at I changed my hostname, why is my bash PS1 prompt unchanged to see if that's at all relevant to your situation. "Rebecca" uses systemd, ...


0

I had the same problem while installing openSUSE 13.2 on my old 32bit MSI Laptop. After GRUB screen the installer loaded the kernel and started some services until it stucks at 'AppArmor: AppArmor sha1 policy hashing enabled'. I thought the problem was actually AppArmor and disabled it on boot with bootparameter 'apparmor=0' ...


2

Before there was such a thing as an initrd, you had to pass the device name of the partition you wanted to use as your root fs on the kernel command line. The kernel had special one off code to parse this name and recognize a handful of common strings, and translate them to their well known dev_t number. That is to say, that internally the kernel knows ...


3

Why not only use what's on the disk ? You can. You do not have to use an initrd (or an initramfs, the newer and more widespread version since kernel 2.6.13). The reason that they are used is that distro kernels are generic and must support a wide range of hardware out of the box. Some of the drivers for different hardware, crucial to mounting a root ...


1

chaos perfectly summarized it. I'd just add that an initial ramdisk (or initrd) is optional. There are certain circumstances it is required, for instance when /usr lies on a separate filesystem, which used to be advertised as a good practice. Also, systemd, which is found on many Linux distributions, requires /usr to be available at boot. Otherwise you have ...


1

The task of the initrd is to make the real root device available and switch into it. The real root device can be (for example) a partition on a hard drive, a nfs share in the network, a filesystem at an USB-stick, a pseudo-filesystem or something else. Nearly every initrd has a routine called mountroot. That's the function that searches for the correct root ...



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