New answers tagged

1

Not sure if this is still something of interest but for the sake of future googlers like myself: There are two separate root directories in play when booting/installing from grub. There is the grub root and the linux root (I'm not sure if this is the technical term). The grub root can be set within the grub.cfg, and determines which files are readily ...


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I'm not sure about Debian, but Ubuntu has a bug with that right now. The current workaround is to add "x-systemd.automount" in the options section of the fstab line. See bug 1515446.


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Seems like you should do grub2-mkconfig in the chroot instead of doing it outside. grub2-mkconfig uses grub-probe to detect real devices associated with mount points, while airootfs (archiso's rootfs) is loaded into the ram and doesn't have a canonical path. So before installing grub and generating config, do this first: arch-chroot /mnt /bin/bash


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I cannot give you a straight answer because you haven't given me a straight question but I will lay out some of the steps you should try out. First and foremost, this is the most important step. DO NOT USE ROOT. Get out of root and use your own user. A lot of Linux distros don't allow you to run X while in root, for good reasons, and you shouldn't. Second, ...


1

Alright, being able to start the service manually sounds good. You also have to enable the service with systemctl enable radio? From the systemctl status radio it looks like the service is not enabled and thus doesn't start.


3

Two initial considerations are You should use a USB3 device and port if possible as USB2 may be too slow Make sure that the ISO that you used includes support for your graphics card or integrated graphics. If you would like to try killing X and going to command prompt you could use Ctrl+Alt+F1 or Ctrl+Alt+F2 to switch to a command prompt and restart the ...


1

I have the same problem on both my servers running F23 server edition. I updated to kernel 4.3.4-300 and rebooted but this resulted in the servers being completely freezed. I had to reboot using an old kernel 4.2.6-301. Could not see the booting messages when hitting ESC button. Looked like plymouth was stalled also. I then installed kernel 4.3.5-300 (from ...


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Problem kind of solved, good enough: I deleted the line: none /proc/xen xenfs defaults 0 0 in /etc/fstab And I changed the Xen setup in grub.cfg to simply 'exit' so it would exit into the EFI boot menu.


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Change the Boot Order in Your Computer's BIOS boot option 1 = hard disk


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I've installed successfully both ways and it doesn't pose an issue as I do not dual boot; I use other alternatives for running win on a machine. I did notice the UEFI swap partition size is significantly smaller than legacy install... I don't know why that is...


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Copy the postgresql unit file: cp /usr/lib/systemd/system/postgresql.service \ /etc/systemd/system/postgresql-userxy.service Then edit postgresql-userxy.service and add User= and WorkingDirectory= to the [Service] section. After that enable the service: systemctl daemon-reload systemctl enable postgresql-userxy.service


1

summary: ext2 is a bad choice for /boot, since (unless I'm missing something or am very unlucky) it appears to prevent "normal" update of GRUB2. details: Today I was updating a 2010-vintage laptop that runs a Debian distro (LMDE2) shipped with win7, which I dualbooted with an unmanaged Linux /boot partition and a managed (LVM2-on-LUKS) partition: $ sudo ...


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I had a similar problem some time ago when upgrading the packages in my Kali 2.0 system, and ended up working around it by installing LightDM. You won't have a gorgeous login interface, but it should work.


2

After searching and trying for a long, long time, I finally found a solution which is acceptable for me. The situation is rather complex, so I try to describe it as structured as possible. Configuration Hardware configuration: DH87RL board i7-4771 CPU GeForce GTX 970 Software configuration: Ubuntu 15.10 Driver selection You can either go with the open ...


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If your embedded device uses U-boot, the kernel image might be written on a particular partition on a NAND flash. See this! If this is the case i think you can locate the binary by looking at your U-boot source code if you have access to it. You can also check the environment variable for clues. This will vary greatly depending on your system so I can't ...


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In computers that conform to the IBM PC boot BIOS sequence: The MBR (absolute sector 0) from disk is loaded by BIOS at memory 0000:7C00. That code is executed. Form IBM to W7 The code used by IBM PC to boot could be seen here: First version of MBR from IBM® Personal Computer™ DOS 2.00 That code has many versions that are also presented in the ...


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I added "noauto,x-systemd.automount" to my mount options in fstab like suggested by "DavidCWGA" here: https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux/issues/824 Working for me now!


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This might be too case-specific. I resolved it by manually upgrading my window manager, sddm. sudo apt-get install sddm It now works for me.


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Run through these basics, it's unclear what you mean by 'gui'. When you boot, you see grub, I assume. You hit enter, and the boot process starts. When you say 'splash screen', do you mean what you see right after you start the boot from grub process? Does the disk chatter for a while? Guess 1 This is unlikely, but because it's what most people with this ...


2

From https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/3/html/Reference_Guide/s1-grub-whatis.html US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/3/html/Reference_Guide/s1-grub-whatis.html GRUB loads itself into memory in the following stages: The Stage 1 or primary boot loader is read into memory by the BIOS from the MBR[1]. The primary ...


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The question is answered by myself now! The problem was that the crypttab entry for the second container was invalid. Even though I double-checked, I missed the error, and the update-initramfs didn't complain either. What do I take away from this? Always triple- or quadruple-check such critical things, as it can often save you a lot of hassle (and others ...


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The way that things are implemented today extlinux.conf needs to be on the same partition as the kernel / devicetree / initrd.


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On ESXi increasing the VM video memory from 5MB to 8MB resolved the issue for me.


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Try holding “Ctrl” at GRUB splash/menu screen and then select previously working kernel. If that won’t help then boot into a rescue mode and do following: yum remove kernel-VERSION yum update kernel reboot


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Please show the partitioning scheme. Use "gpart show". You'll probably see a partition of type freebsd-ufs. The third column (small number) shows which slice it is. You have the device name above. For example, if you see "ada0" and "2", connect those two into "ada0p2".


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So one of the ways to fix this is to make use of a few additional environment variables. If we look in include/configs/ti_armv7_common.h we have: /* * We setup defaults based on constraints from the Linux kernel, which should * also be safe elsewhere. We have the default load at 32MB into DDR (for * the kernel), FDT above 128MB (the maximum location ...


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1) Insert your CD linux-mint , reboot your computer and set it to boot from CD in the BIOS and boot into a live session. You can also use a LiveUSB if you have created one in the past. Install Boot-Repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair Run Boot-Repair ...


3

Certain cases of disk encryption require you to enter a passphrase during boot to unlock the root partition, else the system can't continue booting, because it can't get its data from disk. Only the boot partition won't be encrypted (or is unlocked by GRUB), so the kernel and the initramfs can still be loaded. But that alone makes a very poor experience, ...


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The software that is running to produce that bar is called Plymouth, and it only appears if you have rhgb in your kernel arguments. It basically takes the output of the startup sequence and presents it according to the chosen theme. In this case, it is using the text theme, probably because it can't start the graphical theme.


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The normal way in Linux is to change the very last number of the fstab line from 0 to 2. From the man page for fstab(5): The sixth field (fs_passno). This field is used by the fsck(8) program to determine the order in which filesystem checks are done at reboot time. The root filesystem should be specified with a ...


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I mean you don't really give enough info for a real answer. Try mounting the / partition on your live USB to see if theres any data actually there, and if it does truly look like it really installed, try using a grub repair tool to see if your problems there. If that doesn't work try reinstalling the whole system I guess. Other than that I'm not sure if ...


3

INSTALLING UBUNTU ALONGSIDE WINDOWS 10 Installing Linux is easy, requires no BIOS reconfig/secure boot nonsense. I've tested tested with both 14.04 LTS and 15.10. First build an Ubuntu install disk on a USB thumb drive (either 15.10 or 14.04 LTS). Boot into windows, use Disk Management utility to shrink Windows partition, reboot and boot from USB by ...


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There is probably a problem with your video driver. I resolved it by following (modified) instructions at http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2072420: Press Alt-F2 to switch to a new console sudo apt-get purge xserver-xorg-video-intel then reboot sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-video-intel nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf, remove any present code (if ...


1

So here's how I solved this. Had to run /lib/systemd/systemd-udevd to regain my /dev/fd (even though the system is openrc, not systemd) Downgraded to openrc-0.18.4 (was running 0.20 which I emerged yesterday) emerge -uDav @world reboot Seems like openrc-0.20 disagrees with me :)


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I would boot into single user mode (init=/bin/bash) and run revdep-rebuild, dispatch-conf and make sure your openrc configuration file is sane.


1

Another option is to delete jobs directly from AT spool directory where jobs are stored (this command deletes jobs of user YOURUSER only): find /var/spool/atjobs -user YOUR_USER -type f -exec rm {} \;


0

I'm not an expert, but I have observed that, if you don't turn off the fast boot feature of windows 10 before installing linux, these types of complications occur.



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