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1

The solution is fairly easy, just replace auto to allow-hotplug. So I ended up with this: allow-hotplug lo iface lo inet loopback allow-hotplug wlan0 iface wlan0 inet static address 192.168.150.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 allow-hotplug eth1 iface eth1 inet manual up ifconfig $IFACE ...


0

I finally found the best method for me to start Kali without reinstalling Grub to my HDD. For this i used unetbootin and SuperGrub(Download here) First install unetbootin: sudo apt-get install unetbootin Then rename the supergrub .iso to .img (using .iso gave me booterrors) and start unetbootin. In unetbootin select the floppy method and load the ...


0

EDIT: Note that I'm talking only about PID 1 because I can't english and thought that you want to check up on your primary init process. Change that to the unit you're interested in. I'm sure systemd will spit PID out for you somehow. Or if not, ps ax |grep [commandname] will do it. You'll likely need to adjust the time difference between uptime and process ...


0

Depending on how early in the boot you want this to run, you may want to use cron @reboot. (You may need to play with environmental variables.) Then wrap it in a detached terminal. tmux new -d '/path/to/python /full/path/program/proxy.py' # or # screen -d -m '/path/to/python /full/path/program/proxy.py' Effectively these are backgrounded to synthetic ...


0

The first thing that sticks out in my mind is your sudo command. From my understanding of sudo, it by default takes in one program. When you make a pipe you're saying take the output of this program and put it in another. In other words, you've only ran sudo on xzcat. So you should do: xzcat ...


0

check new kernel location in /boot/grub/grub.conf file. upgraded kernel params will show upper side of old kernel. Another thing is check default value. It should be 0 for new kernel.


3

Forget about /etc/inittab and run levels. As the systemd doco says, in the systemd world the concept of run levels is "obsolete". systemd itself works in terms of targets, not run levels. Also obsolete is your /etc/inittab file. The upgrade from Debian 7 to Debian 8 switches the init system from System 5 init+rc to systemd. It leaves /etc/inittab lying ...


0

I solved this by installing grub manually from another linux. After installing Debian on the USB drive, mount it to /mnt and then use the command sudo grub-install /dev/sdb --force --boot-directory=/mnt assuming that the device of the USB drive name is /dev/sdb (DON'T SUFFIX THIS WITH NUMBERS SUCH AS sdb1). You can know the device name using fdisk -l (run ...


-1

After installation add you user to the plugdev group to use Solaar as non-root user: # gpasswd -a $USER plugdev


5

mount is a command, i.e. a program, i.e. userspace code. mount is a system call, i.e. kernel code. The mount command calls the mount system call to do the bulk of its job. In addition, it performs auxiliary tasks such as parsing its command line, consulting /etc/fstab, etc.


0

I've need just manual boot to ubuntu and then just sudo update-grub


0

I found the answer to my question. All of my problems were caused by the fact that I was trying to automate the launching of a GUI. Thanks to this link I was able to get this to work using x server and .xinitrc. Thanks to the guys over in Raspberrypi for pointing me in the right direction.


0

Debian Jessie now uses systemd and the concept of runlevel should be modified into target units. For starting Jessie in text mode without removing Gnome or LXDE it's then sufficient to modify this symlink as follow : sudo ln -sf /lib/systemd/system/multi-user.target /lib/systemd/system/default.target This action is practiaclly the same of setting a text ...


4

Usually /etc/rc.local is the valid option, but it also depends on the amount of work that is involved in "syncing some stuff" and how important it is that users cannot login before this action has completed. If you want to make sure that the syncing has completed before users login, you can consider one of two "nologin" options. Write a script that sets ...


1

I would personally go with @John's solution, but you can also set the startup sequence so that at the very beginning (near the S01 symlinks) it runs this command: echo "Please try to log in later" > /etc/nologin And then put in /etc/rc.local: /root/yourscript.sh rm -f /etc/nologin The presence of the /etc/nologin file prevents non-root users to ...


2

It looks like it is called after the system is ready to accepting logins from users. This is how I understand the "at the end of each multiuser runlevel". No, /etc/rc.local get execute when system boot. ( When user login using ssh it will set environment and run scripts from /etc/profile ~/.bashrc, Read this page for more information. ) I was ...


3

For the case you describe, calling your sync script from /etc/rc.local is a valid solution. It's the one I would probably go with as well, though there are undoubtedly other solutions that other people would come up with. It's executed after all the "built-in" rc startup scripts, but before the login prompt is presented at the console. Do keep in mind, ...


0

Have you tried booting with a kernel argument? At GRUB, press 'e' to edit the grub entry, and add to end of the block of text: nomodeset and then continue to boot. The string nomodeset turns off the kernel mode setting function that sometimes causes problems for some graphic cards. http://www.x.org/wiki/ModeSetting/


0

Possibly not a CPU bottleneck but slow flash media access time? Found this thread below on the TI forums talking about flash throughput being limited to 0.6 MB/sec. OMAP-L138 EVM SPI Flash read performance and boot time For a test (as Janus suggested), see if you can compress a kernel image and/or the initramfs with gzip -0 if possible. Or might be simpler ...


0

To me, if, as you say, grub can't detect your LVM /boot filesystem and grub-mkconfig usually makes a mistake on generating grub.cfg, that seems reason enough to avoid this configuration and switch to something that grub supports better. When you say "just give a proper address to the intended boot partition", I don't know what you mean by "address" or what ...


1

I have been trying a dual boot with window 7 and centos 7 for 2 days and I did it. Just follow simple steps Install window 7 Then centos 7 When you restart the pc you will not see any boot option for windows 7 in grub. Boot into centos switch to su use command cfdisk Then check for flags where boot is written notify that partition Then open grub file in ...


1

It's not a performance problem, it's a troubleshooting and fixing things problem. /boot is the bootstrap location - in there is a few files that start off everything else in your system. And sometimes you need to poke in there to fix a problem (such as grub config or similar). If you have to do this, it's useful to have a lowest common denominators sort of ...


0

Here are things that I've tried to install Elementary OS Freya on a UEFI PC/laptop. I tried to find the UEFI setting in the BIOS mode after I've done installing the eOS, but I can't find any setting on this asus. - failed. I created partitions for /boot and / separately and try to installed the eOS again, but yet it's still failed. The last try, I realized ...


1

Please read 4.3.3 at http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq4.html#MkInsMedia -- you're using the wrong image file and device.


1

Use install57.fs (the iso file won't work) and follow these instructions: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/180340.


1

I believe you are looking for I believe you are looking for Iso booting with grub2 or the equivalent for your bootloader. Gummiboot seems to support it as well for instance. Be warned however that the partition on which the iso is placed has to be wisely chosen, since you may not be able to use that same partition in your new installation. The ubuntu ...


7

My question is, which file in /proc gets read by the kernel during the boot up process? This was a question on my LPIC 101 test... Sounds like a trick question. The files in /proc aren't real files on disk (this is why they have a size of 0) and the nodes don't exist until the kernel mounts a procfs file system there and populates it. Procfs and sysfs ...


4

In general linux has very good support for network devices. If the device will work with your version of linux it will allow setup of nfs root with the appropriate initrd. so the problem with root over nfs is that you have to make an initrd that will accommodate it. NFS root without initrd may still work, but will not work with usb ethernet adapters as they ...


1

# tune2fs -l $(df -P /boot | awk 'NR==2 {print $1}') | grep Last Last mounted on: /boot Last mount time: Mon Mar 30 10:40:08 2015 Last write time: Mon Mar 30 10:40:08 2015 Last checked: Mon Mar 30 10:40:01 2015 Each time you mount your partition read-write, the last mount time is updated (at least for ext2/ext3/ext4 ...



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