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-1

Use systemctl set-default multi-user.target and reboot the VM. The VM will get into CLI mode.


1

It works exactly the same, except that systemd's init binary does not use inittab or the rcS scripts; instead it uses different logic to decide how to start a daemon. The kernel part of it, however, is still the same. If you want more than that, you'll have to be more specific...


0

You probably have this issue: https://www.happyassassin.net/2016/07/07/psa-failure-to-boot-after-kernel-update-on-skylake-systems/ It is related to a kernel update on Skylake cpu In case the link dies here are some workarounds: Boot an older kernel. Boot with the kernel parameter dis_ucode_ldr. Downgrade the microcode_ctl package to version 2.1-11 or ...


1

I am not familiar with sfdisk, but you could accomplish the same thing, partition table AND MBR back up using dd. This was in my notes and I am not the author... Backing up the MBR The MBR is stored in the the first 512 bytes of the disk. It consist of 3 parts: The first 446 bytes contain the boot loader. The next 64 bytes contain the partition table (4 ...


1

According to an article in RHEL knowlegde base, /var/log/boot.log was populated from v5.0 to 5.2 only. Later versions stopped doing that (for a reason unknown to my common sense...). The article contains an rc-bootlog.txt patch to apply to /etc/rc.d/rc with command patch -bp0 <rc-bootlog.txt I applied that patch and boot.log now contains the expected ...


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Just from reading the source, this should be the place in the linux loader and this the place in the relocater (independent from the loader). I hope that helps :)


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Found it. In a similar case, the author complained that: I have to wait for about 20 seconds until my network comes up. It appeared that: This delay is caused by Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) Indeed, one of the differences was that the /etc/network/interfaces of Debian host contained bridge_stp on, while on Ubuntu, there was no bridge_stp ...


0

Programs run from the initramfs are perfectly ordinary programs. They run like any other Linux process. Switching from real mode (the boot-time legacy mode of 32-bit x86 processors) to protected mode (the normal working mode of 32-bit x86 processors since the 286 generation) happens very early in the Linux kernel boot process. Even drivers have not started ...


0

When I start the version of uboot that I am using, it automatically displays a "virtual kernel memory layout". Memory: 859068k/859068k available, 25668k reserved, 0K highmem Virtual kernel memory layout: vector : 0xffff0000 - 0xffff1000 ( 4 kB) fixmap : 0xfff00000 - 0xfffe0000 ( 896 kB) DMA : 0xf9e00000 - 0xffe00000 ( 96 MB) ...


0

Just wasted around 6 hours creating a USB boot device for Linux Mint, backing up all my data from 2 partitions, and attempting various rescue attempts after getting the dreaded sbin/init not found message... This happened after a minor update - system would not reboot. It seems the whole sbin folder had mysteriously been deleted and could not be recovered. ...


1

Bios loads mediums in some strict order that is present in its settings. Therefore, if you have disk A and B plugged in, then MBR of the disk that will be loaded first is used. You can always change this option in BIOS settings. More generally, BIOS is aware that there are multiple media it can boot into, but it doesn't check them all(is unaware of their ...


0

If it's BIOS rather than UEFI... Install os-prober if it is not already. Then run update-grub. It should automatically detect the windows install and put it in grub.cfg so you can boot it. If UEFI, I'm not sure why it should be different, but docs seem to imply it's relevant somehow.


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The initramfs filesystem is, to all intents and purposes, just another filesystem that's loaded at /, and programs that run in it are run from user space under the running kernel. This means they have the same limitations as any other program. You might find the data you want via /dev/mem but you probably shouldn't rely on specific iPXE implementations; ...


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SOLVED: I ran Memtest86+ (memtest.org) which revealed problems in my RAM. I isolated the problems to one of my 4GB sticks, which I removed and found that everything now works fine (although I still use the "nomodeset" boot parameter). I hadn't tried this earlier because mdsched.exe (Windows memory diagnostic) said the RAM was all fine. The giveaway that ...


0

Have an Asus Laptop here so it's a little different but I too have multiple EFI on the same system and have to press F2 on boot in order to access the EFI/BIOS and choose the relevant drive partition from which to boot. To avoid doing that you can just change the drive order. If the Grub2 boot loader doesn't work it is very trial and error but this page ...


1

[I think this might be my first post on StackExchange] My first suspicion is that the SSD drive in your C740 is not working properly, and that replacing it and recovering the appropriate ChromeOS image might bring it back to life. Secondly, you won't be able to boot up with an alternate OS until the appropriate boot flags are changed (which you cannot do ...


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Nevermind, I found the answer. Inserting a Ctrl-Alt-Backspace restarted X and fixed my issue. Thanks anyways though.


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As stated by Celada, /etc/network/if-up.d scripts are run for each interface. To avoid rule duplication simply add: [ "$IFACE" == "eth0" ] || exit 0 at the top of your script. This will cause the script to exit immediately if the interface is not the desired one.


5

To understand what every file is responsible for you should understand how MPU starts up. As I understood from your qestion you use NXP (Freescale) i.MX microprocessor family. It includes small ROM loader, which will make basic system setup (interfaces to memory, clock tree etc.), search for media to boot from (based on burned OTP bits or GPIO), find ...


3

zImage is the actual binary image of the compiled kernel. It's what the boot loader will load and attempt to execute (I believe on embedded linux it's written to the boot sector directly somehow; consult your embedded linux distro manual for instructions) rootfs is the so-called INITial RamDisk (also known as initrd) image that contains everything that the ...


0

You have a number of problems: The noauto flag is telling mount to ignore this line for -a mounts. You would be able to manually attempt the mount with mount /mnt/shares/NASDisk3. If you want to have this mounted at boot time then remove the noauto flag. Your umount syntax is wrong; it should be umount -t cifs. Otherwise you are trying to tell the ...


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I don't really know of a standard way of booting from an SD card, how easy it is or isn't depends mostly on what Android device you are using: For example if you have a Nexus device you can just download MultiROM from the Play store and you're good to go. It's never normally that simple; I currently am trying to get my Mediatek MT6575 based device to boot ...


0

Eject your Bootable Flash drive and insert GParted CD, check which of the devices/partitions have got the boot flag on, if it's other than your native HDD(which it used to/should be), revert & save it(don't let the flash be bootable) and try rebooting. Your HDD has already got the grub, it could just be pointing through the flash as while updating you ...


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ef00 is the correct code for UEFI boot partition. The side does not have to be 300MB, I would say at least 100MB. I generally use 512MB for no real reason other than it is large enough that I don't need to care and I like the number. But it only has to be as large and the kernels and confis you store in it (with some room to spare). Mine currently uses 36MB ...


2

All this simply because somebody didn't fully implement the UEFI specification. All you have to do is boot a live system and: sudo mount -U <UUID of your ESP> /mnt sudo mkdir /mnt/EFI/BOOT sudo cp -v /mnt/boot/<your-vendor>/grubx64.efi /mnt/EFI/BOOT/ and then shutdown, remove the live system and reboot. More info about the path used can be ...


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I was able to get it running by compiling my SATA controller (libata) into my kernel, which was originally being compiled as a module (and which was why it would run fine with an initial ram disk).


1

update-grub only updates de grub configurations; you need usually to run grub-install after it. The system is not booting, because grub is thus still pointing to the old kernel and not to the new one. If you have grub in your MBR, it should have been then: sudo update-grub sudo grub-install /dev/sda I thus advise to boot the system/VM from a live system ...


0

I found out, how to configure pxelinux for my needs. tftp was already running and working, i made a "tail -f /var/log/messages" to discover that chain.c32 was not working (it was loading, but nothing happened): 2016-06-29T16:15 uaewg-srv xinetd[1536]: START: tftp from=::ffff:172.99.199.9 2016-06-29T16:15 uaewg-srv in.tftpd[2939]: RRQ from ::ffff:172.99.199....


0

I've had exactly the same issue today. Digging through boot-repair tool logs I've found this error: gui-actions-purge.sh: line 441: ${APTTYP[$USRPART]} ${INSTALLTYP[$USRPART]} ${YESTYP[$USRPART]} linux${$KERNELTOREINST}-generic linux-headers-generic: bad substitution The logs are stored in the \var\log\boot-sav\log\YYYY-MM-DD__HHhMMboot-repairXX\boot-...


1

You wrote: result of execution of ls -l $(type -p su) -rwxr-xr-x root root 157400 2016-04-21 19:11 su There's your problem. su is missing the setuid root bit. The permissions should look like this: -rwsr-xr-x 1 root root 40040 Nov 12 2015 /bin/su There are three possibilities for this situation. The su executable on the server is not setuid (...


1

Typically this happens if the NFS share isn't exported properly. By default, the root user is mapped to nobody. This means that when you try and run su (which is suid root) then you will try to access files on the NFS server as user nobody... and this won't let you read /etc/shadow and similar. You didn't say what your NFS server is, but if it's the ...


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In case anyone stumbles across this post and is using Centos 7 / GRUB2 (like I am), the variable name appears to have changed to GRUB_DISABLE_UUID (not GRUB_DISABLE_LINUX_UUID). You can check yours at /usr/share/grub/grub-mkconfig_lib. Mine has this: if [ "x$GRUB_DISABLE_UUID" != "xtrue" ] After a grub2-mkconfig, the UUIDs were replaced with /dev/sda1, ...


0

I found a solution to systems error kernel not loading Use live cd to gain access to your existing installation. Once in reinstall Linux kernel : pacman -S Linux Then delete the fstab file from etc/fstab : rm /etc/fstab Now reinstall systemd: pacman -S systemd When reinstalling systemd it will automatically generate a new fstab file Now reinstall ...


0

If the root= parameter is correct and the issue is just that the necessary device isn't available (for example because the initramfs failed to assemble an md RAID), then it's enough to make the device available manually, for example: mdadm --assemble ... Then check that the device is there and if everything looks good, hit ctrl + d or type exit to quit ...



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