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5

GRUB doesn't know that you've removed /boot. During the boot process GRUB loads long before the kernel and always has to figure out what's going on without the convenience of things like mounted filesystems. When you install GRUB it's told where (as in the BIOS or EFI partition) to find it's config file. It isn't until long after GRUB has handed off to ...


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Certain cases of disk encryption require you to enter a passphrase during boot to unlock the root partition, else the system can't continue booting, because it can't get its data from disk. Only the boot partition won't be encrypted (or is unlocked by GRUB), so the kernel and the initramfs can still be loaded. But that alone makes a very poor experience, ...


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INSTALLING UBUNTU ALONGSIDE WINDOWS 10 Installing Linux is easy, requires no BIOS reconfig/secure boot nonsense. I've tested tested with both 14.04 LTS and 15.10. First build an Ubuntu install disk on a USB thumb drive (either 15.10 or 14.04 LTS). Boot into windows, use Disk Management utility to shrink Windows partition, reboot and boot from USB by ...


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Since it's now clear you're running software raid ("fake raid", where the firmware/BIOS also has a software RAID implementation to make booting Windows off of it easier—in this case, Intel Matrix Storage), you're probably seeing some bug in Arch's initramfs w/r/t partitioning md arrays. True hardware raid is almost entirely transparent to the OS; e.g., you ...


2

After searching and trying for a long, long time, I finally found a solution which is acceptable for me. The situation is rather complex, so I try to describe it as structured as possible. Configuration Hardware configuration: DH87RL board i7-4771 CPU GeForce GTX 970 Software configuration: Ubuntu 15.10 Driver selection You can either go with the open ...


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If you can live with adding a a separate board, the WittyPi give you the means to start and stop the Raspberry Pi at scheduled times. I found it to use 1.7 to 2.4 mA @ 5VDC while in sleep mode with power connected. The internal battery holds the RTC if the power is disconnected. http://www.uugear.com/witty-pi-realtime-clock-power-management-for-raspberry-pi/ ...


1

Copy the postgresql unit file: cp /usr/lib/systemd/system/postgresql.service \ /etc/systemd/system/postgresql-userxy.service Then edit postgresql-userxy.service and add User= and WorkingDirectory= to the [Service] section. After that enable the service: systemctl daemon-reload systemctl enable postgresql-userxy.service


1

The question is answered by myself now! The problem was that the crypttab entry for the second container was invalid. Even though I double-checked, I missed the error, and the update-initramfs didn't complain either. What do I take away from this? Always triple- or quadruple-check such critical things, as it can often save you a lot of hassle (and others ...


1

So here's how I solved this. Had to run /lib/systemd/systemd-udevd to regain my /dev/fd (even though the system is openrc, not systemd) Downgraded to openrc-0.18.4 (was running 0.20 which I emerged yesterday) emerge -uDav @world reboot Seems like openrc-0.20 disagrees with me :)


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I would boot into single user mode (init=/bin/bash) and run revdep-rebuild, dispatch-conf and make sure your openrc configuration file is sane.


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Another option is to delete jobs directly from AT spool directory where jobs are stored (this command deletes jobs of user YOURUSER only): find /var/spool/atjobs -user YOUR_USER -type f -exec rm {} \;


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You can get back fedora. I encountered this issue on my laptop computer each time when the grub2-efi package updated/reinstalled (including system upgraded to next release). It will caused grub2 boot into some kinds of rescue mode like yours. The grub2-efi package from Fedora seems can't install correctly on my laptop (ASUS TX300, Fedora x86_64, version 18 ...


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You need to specify the absolute path to the kernel file. An absolute path starts at the root directory and starts with a /. If /boot is on the root partition, that means kernel /boot/vmlinuz If /boot is on a separate partition, that means kernel /vmlinuz The same goes for initrd.img. In addition, you may need a root statement, to point Grub to the ...


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I'm answering my own question in case anyone else is trying to figure this one out. I discovered my two errors: a) the path wasn't right - I should've used kernel /boot/vmlinuz b) the kernel & initrd names were not right. The following is now working: title Debian uuid 5329c69c-c525-4e0e-8026-3418a0db8fb2 kernel /boot/vmlinuz-3.16.0-4-586 ...


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Looking over your kernel config, it looks like you enabled everything a modern system would need to boot without an initrd but you're using an older computer; I noticed in your lshw output you have an ISA bridge and a Pentium M 1.4 CPU. My guess is you're missing a PATA option like CONFIG_PATA_MPIIX or ATA_GENERIC or PATA_LEGACY, but instead of playing the ...


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summary: ext2 is a bad choice for /boot, since (unless I'm missing something or am very unlucky) it appears to prevent "normal" update of GRUB2. details: Today I was updating a 2010-vintage laptop that runs a Debian distro (LMDE2) shipped with win7, which I dualbooted with an unmanaged Linux /boot partition and a managed (LVM2-on-LUKS) partition: $ sudo ...


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If your embedded device uses U-boot, the kernel image might be written on a particular partition on a NAND flash. See this! If this is the case i think you can locate the binary by looking at your U-boot source code if you have access to it. You can also check the environment variable for clues. This will vary greatly depending on your system so I can't ...



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