Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Beside the meaning of the ESP(EFI System Partition), is really just any partition formatted with one of the UEFI spec-defined variants of FAT and given a specific GPT partition type to help the firmware find it. This way, all EFI executables will be stored at one place, and "chainload" the Operating System specific loader or other EFI executables The steps ...


3

The problem here is that by default Arch boots up with kernel modesetting for the display (and console), using the open source nouveau driver. It seems that the driver included in this kernel doesn't support your graphics chipset, and rather than fallback, it simply gives you no console display. To disable kernel modesetting you can edit the boot options in ...


3

I'm assuming you are using a Debian/Ubuntu based system as they do not automatically remove older kernels, whereas Fedora and family do. List all your installed kernels with: dpkg -l | grep linux-image You'll get a list of all packages. Decide which ones you want to keep and remove the others: sudo apt-get autoremove linux-image-a.b.c linux-image-x.y.z ...


3

I got the answer. At this line: linux /vmlinuz-3.13.0-32-generic root=/dev/mapper/ubuntu-vg-root ro append single and it becomes to linux /vmlinuz-3.13.0-32-generic root=/dev/mapper/ubuntu-vg-root ro single Then press Ctrl + x. You will goes into single user mode. To make this permanent, you need to edit /etc/default/grub and change this line: ...


2

You should be able to restore permissions from a root shell, if you manage to start one. You should be able to get a root shell by logging in as root on the console. At this point, depending on your configuration, you may or may not be able to gain root access from an ordinary account with su or sudo, and you probably won't be able to log in under any ...


2

The dependency graph in systemd is only kept in memory. There is no (binary) on-disk cache of loaded units or their properties whatsoever. But it seems that this have bad influence on performance. The unit files are completely re-read and the dependency graph is completely recalculated every time you issue systemctl daemon-reload or call an equivalent ...


2

Could you add the mount command to /etc/fstab instead of doing it with a script? As for the second part, rc.local is run by root by default, so if you aren't taking steps to run as nass you will be mounting the NFS share as /root/sg. If you want it to run as a different user from rc.local you would have to do something like su nass -c ...


1

jkt123's will work for most distributions I guess. However for Arch Linux it didn't work, at least not with the packages I have available. The indices you can set with grub-set-default only correspond to the main menu entries. The kernel options are however in a submenu. So either you move the kernel entry out of the submenu into the main menu or you put ...


1

As mentioned in the comments, you can set the default kernel to boot into using the grub-set-default X command, where X is the number of the kernel you want to boot into. In some distributions you can also set this number by editing the /etc/default/grub file and setting GRUB_DEFAULT=X, and then running update-grub. The number is the index to an array of ...


1

The root directory is just what it says: your root directory, i.e /. If you are running grub-install while booted from some other medium and have your normal root directory mounted somewhere other than /, then you want to specify this argument to point it to your root directory.


1

I'm not too much of an expert about GRUB, but as far as I know, the root directory for GRUB it's the directory where you can install a working GRUB when you have started your system in recovery mode: grub-install –-root-directory=/test/kernelimage /dev/sda Here the root directory contains an image of the Linux kernel to boot, and must also contain a ...


1

“vmlinuz” as a format name does mean “gzipped vmlinux file which got stripped of all its symbols”. However, as a file name, vmlinuz is often used for any kernel image which is in a compressed format that a bootloader supports, such as the zimage format or the bzimage format. The name vmlinuz is popular on x86 distributions, regardless of the actual format of ...


1

If you install Grub to a partition, nothing is modified outside that partition. In particular, the MBR (if the disk has classical DOS partitions) is not modified. If you do that, Linux can only be booted if the bootloader in the BIOS or UEFI knows where to look for it. The reason to install Grub on a partition is when you already have another bootloader in ...


1

One way to do this is to use cron. On Debian-based systems (and probably others, but I'm not sure which) you can use the @reboot directive to run a command each time the system reboots. Run crontab -e and add this line: @reboot /path/to/your/script.sh That, however, will not guarantee that the script will run after xfce4 since it will be executed when the ...


1

If you're trying to install a new operating system; elementaryOS's Grub shouldn't be showing up. You should be booting right to the GRUB/Bootloader/EFI Stub on the USB Device. You should insert the USB and run it from your BIOS/EFI Boot Menu. If its loading elementaryOS then your computer isn't seeing the boot record on the USB. If it loads the USB but ...


1

Via Wikipedia: ESP (EFI System Partition) contains the boot loader programs for all installed operating systems (which are contained in other partitions on the same or other storage device), device driver files for devices present in a computer that are used by the firmware at boot time, system utility programs that are intended to be run before ...


1

As you already mentioned you're using W8.1 Some things you might have a look at: SecureBoot AHCI General Problems / Usage for (Linux)/Ubuntu with newer hardware-> UEFI Troubleshooting


1

Maybe I can help you. Instead of pressing the enter-key on "install elementary" press the e-key to edit the code. When the code comes up you will see a line of code that has the words "quiet splash" written. On the end of that line write: nomodeset xforcevesa , and then press the f10-key.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible