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6

Don't allow USB access. Truth is that if someone has physical access to the machine, there's not a lot you can do. In this narrow case your best bet is to disable booting to USB and lock the BIOS (or whatever EFI setup utility is being used) with a password. It's a bit like putting a pad lock on a garage door, there are ways around it, but it's an easy ...


4

There is really only one answer to this: full disk encryption. The way full disk encryption is usually done with Linux, your /boot partition is not encrypted and contains the kernel and initramfs — just enough functionality to start a minimal environment that prompts you for the passphrase to decrypt the root filesystem and get access to everything else. ...


3

It seems impossible to copy base packages from boot media to RAM to build an alternative APT repository for installation with current Debian Installer. But you might be able to eject the media after boot and continue installation using "netboot" image which would download everything from the internet, not out of boot media. You can remove it permanently ...


2

The /boot directory in the root is simply the place where your boot partition gets mounted, which means the files in that partition appear in /boot. These days about the only reason to have a /boot partition is if you want to encrypt your root partition. In the late '90s it was often needed to work around BIOS limitations on hard disk size: the BIOS could ...


2

On arch linux, there is an AUR package dropbear_initrd_encrypt that does what you want out of the box. Works pretty well for wired interfaces. I had to hack it up slightly for wireless.


1

This is kind of crude, but why not just blacklist the atkbd driver. echo blacklist atkbd > /etc/modprobe.d/no-atkbd.conf You'll probably need to rebuild your initrd to make sure it gets blacklisted very early on in the boot process.


1

There are two ways to pass arguments to kernel: 1. Compile them inside. 2. Use bootloader So first check if your arguments are not compiled into kernel. Second setenv command you've found in not a bash command but boot loader command. It depends on how particular device made, but usually there is a partition in some internal storage (flash memory of your ...


1

You can use a uEnv.txt file in your boot partition to specify arguments for the boot. This is an example for Xilinx zynq-7000 devices from the yocto meta-zybo layer: kernel_image=uImage devicetree_image=zybo-zynq7.dtb bootargs=console=ttyPS0,115200 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rw rootwait earlyprintk uenvcmd=echo Copying Linux from SD to RAM... && fatload ...


1

The GRUB banner is printed before configuration files are read, so the only way to get rid of them is patching the source or the binaries. There is prior art in this field, though, if you really mean it. Syslinux behaves the same in this respect. The boot loader banner is often used as a "progress bar": different parts of it are printed by different stages ...


1

Edit your /boot/grub2/grub.cfg configuration file. This is the file which contains the configurations for GRUB BootLoader. Add a Menu entry in grub menu to boot from your OS reside in P3. /etc/grub.d/custom_entry the menu entry will look something like this (Update with your disk number, partition number, linux image path, initrd path) (Follow the already ...


1

use a live-cd (ubuntu/fedora) and acess your Linux partitions, copy the files/data from there to your windows partitions. First priority is to save the Data. copy to an external disk/usb pendrive, then Later fix the grub issue with grub restore/rescue process.


1

Try installing Fedora first and then Debian. Debian usually plays well with others, as long as it the last kid picked.



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