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7

My question is, which file in /proc gets read by the kernel during the boot up process? This was a question on my LPIC 101 test... Sounds like a trick question. The files in /proc aren't real files on disk (this is why they have a size of 0) and the nodes don't exist until the kernel mounts a procfs file system there and populates it. Procfs and sysfs ...


5

mount is a command, i.e. a program, i.e. userspace code. mount is a system call, i.e. kernel code. The mount command calls the mount system call to do the bulk of its job. In addition, it performs auxiliary tasks such as parsing its command line, consulting /etc/fstab, etc.


4

Usually /etc/rc.local is the valid option, but it also depends on the amount of work that is involved in "syncing some stuff" and how important it is that users cannot login before this action has completed. If you want to make sure that the syncing has completed before users login, you can consider one of two "nologin" options. Write a script that sets ...


4

In general linux has very good support for network devices. If the device will work with your version of linux it will allow setup of nfs root with the appropriate initrd. so the problem with root over nfs is that you have to make an initrd that will accommodate it. NFS root without initrd may still work, but will not work with usb ethernet adapters as they ...


3

For the case you describe, calling your sync script from /etc/rc.local is a valid solution. It's the one I would probably go with as well, though there are undoubtedly other solutions that other people would come up with. It's executed after all the "built-in" rc startup scripts, but before the login prompt is presented at the console. Do keep in mind, ...


3

Forget about /etc/inittab and run levels. As the systemd doco says, in the systemd world the concept of run levels is "obsolete". systemd itself works in terms of targets, not run levels. Also obsolete is your /etc/inittab file. The upgrade from Debian 7 to Debian 8 switches the init system from System 5 init+rc to systemd. It leaves /etc/inittab lying ...


2

It looks like it is called after the system is ready to accepting logins from users. This is how I understand the "at the end of each multiuser runlevel". No, /etc/rc.local get execute when system boot. ( When user login using ssh it will set environment and run scripts from /etc/profile ~/.bashrc, Read this page for more information. ) I was ...


1

The solution is fairly easy, just replace auto to allow-hotplug. So I ended up with this: allow-hotplug lo iface lo inet loopback allow-hotplug wlan0 iface wlan0 inet static address 192.168.150.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 allow-hotplug eth1 iface eth1 inet manual up ifconfig $IFACE ...


1

I would personally go with @John's solution, but you can also set the startup sequence so that at the very beginning (near the S01 symlinks) it runs this command: echo "Please try to log in later" > /etc/nologin And then put in /etc/rc.local: /root/yourscript.sh rm -f /etc/nologin The presence of the /etc/nologin file prevents non-root users to ...


1

It's not a performance problem, it's a troubleshooting and fixing things problem. /boot is the bootstrap location - in there is a few files that start off everything else in your system. And sometimes you need to poke in there to fix a problem (such as grub config or similar). If you have to do this, it's useful to have a lowest common denominators sort of ...


1

Please read 4.3.3 at http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq4.html#MkInsMedia -- you're using the wrong image file and device.


1

Use install57.fs (the iso file won't work) and follow these instructions: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/180340.


1

I believe you are looking for I believe you are looking for Iso booting with grub2 or the equivalent for your bootloader. Gummiboot seems to support it as well for instance. Be warned however that the partition on which the iso is placed has to be wisely chosen, since you may not be able to use that same partition in your new installation. The ubuntu ...


1

# tune2fs -l $(df -P /boot | awk 'NR==2 {print $1}') | grep Last Last mounted on: /boot Last mount time: Mon Mar 30 10:40:08 2015 Last write time: Mon Mar 30 10:40:08 2015 Last checked: Mon Mar 30 10:40:01 2015 Each time you mount your partition read-write, the last mount time is updated (at least for ext2/ext3/ext4 ...


1

jkt123's will work for most distributions I guess. However for Arch Linux it didn't work, at least not with the packages I have available. The indices you can set with grub-set-default only correspond to the main menu entries. The kernel options are however in a submenu. So either you move the kernel entry out of the submenu into the main menu or you put ...


1

If you're trying to install a new operating system; elementaryOS's Grub shouldn't be showing up. You should be booting right to the GRUB/Bootloader/EFI Stub on the USB Device. You should insert the USB and run it from your BIOS/EFI Boot Menu. If its loading elementaryOS then your computer isn't seeing the boot record on the USB. If it loads the USB but ...


1

I have been trying a dual boot with window 7 and centos 7 for 2 days and I did it. Just follow simple steps Install window 7 Then centos 7 When you restart the pc you will not see any boot option for windows 7 in grub. Boot into centos switch to su use command cfdisk Then check for flags where boot is written notify that partition Then open grub file in ...



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