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9

The handover from the bootloader to the kernel necessarily involves some architecture-specific considerations such as memory addresses and register use. Consequently, the place to look is in the architecture-specific directories (arch/*). Furthermore, handover from the bootloader involves a precise register usage protocol which is likely to be implemented in ...


6

In case you don't understand this, you have essentially destroyed your copies of /bin/sh and /bin/bash.  Boot from some other medium (e.g., an optical disc, another partition, or a USB device) and restore them from a backup (or distribution media) or the Internet.


4

I figured it out. My bootloader wasn't configured properly. Sounds obvious, right? Modifying fstab doesn't quite qualify as configuring the bootloader. I had to change a line in /boot/syslinux/syslinux.cgf to refer to correct boot partition. That said, there was no need to boot off of the second disk in the first place. I could have avoided this problem by ...


3

First of all, systemd is not a traditional unix init. Systemd is so much more, so it's a bit unfair to compare the two. To answer the question, what appears to be necessary are some binaries and the following configuration files: /usr/lib/systemd/system/default.target /usr/lib/systemd/system/basic.target /usr/lib/systemd/system/sysinit.target ...


3

Try looking at start_kernel() in /init/main.c. This is the function that is called by the boot-loader after it has setup some basic facilities such as memory paging. For more context: wikipedia Linux startup process.


3

If you don't use systemd, it could be Debian bug 754987 in udev, since it involves a 30-second delay. The consequence of this bug in my dmesg log file: [ 19.809738] input: HP WMI hotkeys as /devices/virtual/input/input14 [ 25.107974] WARNING! power/level is deprecated; use power/control instead [ 50.739902] Adding 19800076k swap on /dev/sda5. ...


2

It only matters if you're going to use the ancient GRUB, ext4 is only supported by GRUB2. ext2 is simple, robust and well-supported, which makes it a good choice for /boot.


1

When it comes to non-OS X partitions, bless only does two things: Make sure the partition is marked as bootable. The Fedora installer should have already taken care of this. If so, bless will not do anything for you. Adjust the Mac's NVRAM settings to make the chosen volume the default boot volume. Apple being Apple, the mechanism to do this is likely to ...


1

Your kernel doesn't include the drivers needed to access the root filesystem (e.g. the ahci sata module and possibly also the ext4 module). You either need to provide an initrd/initramfs that loads the appropriate modules or you need to compile a kernel that includes the necessary drivers statically (not as modules). Since your rootfs doesn't include tools ...


1

You have missed two steps before the make install, which installs the required drivers. Before make install do make modules and make modules_install in that order. This installs drivers based on your .config files. The error can also happen due to improper configuration in the .config file and hence some missing drivers. So here is a hackish way to do the ...



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