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5

As @Leiaz very correctly pointed out in the comments, /sbin in Arch (and by extension, Manjaro) is now a symlink to /usr/bin. This means that unless /usr is mounted, /usr/sbin/init will not exist. You therefore need to make sure that /usr is mounted by the initial ramdisk. That's what the Arch wiki quote in your OP means: If you keep /usr as a separate ...


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


3

As the kernel documentation states, /dev/nfs is not a real device but only a hint to the kernel to use NFS as rootfs. You'll also have to tell the kernel where to find this root through the nfsroot parameter or a properly set up DHCP daemon. For the latter one to work you'll also have to either configure your kernel to auto-configure its network ...


2

I would guess that this has much to do with the way bootloader and kernel are glued. Section 5.1.3 (Bootstrap Loader) in Hallinan's Embedded Linux Primer has the following to say on this : Some bootstrap loaders perform checksum veriļ¬cation of the kernel image, and most decompress and relocate the kernel image. The difference between a bootloader and a ...


2

I've just had to deal with this on a laptop running Debian Testing (Jessie/Sid). Possibly relevant: swap partition on an LVM volume (non-encrypted) at /dev/vg1/swap. To make the system resume after hibernation, I had to edit /etc/default/grub and change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="resume=/dev/mapper/vg1-swap" and then run ...


2

From Mint, you can change root to your Manjaro installation, in order to regenerate initramfs. Mount your Manjaro root under the directory of your choice ( ~/foo). Mount your /usr partition at ~/foo/usr, also mount boot if it is separate. Mount proc sys dev : # mount -t proc proc ~/foo/proc/ # mount --rbind /sys ~/foo/sys/ # mount --rbind /dev ~/foo/dev/ ...


2

Try changing the values that are in etc/default/grub to look like these: GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" Then run sudo update-grub.


1

So, the reason was that I had compiled the kernel like so: make oldconfig make -j6 sudo make install I was wondering why my previous (official ubuntu repo) initrd was 28m in size while the new one was 8m. I had not installed the modules! Doing sudo make INSTALL_MOD_STRIP=1 modules_install sudo make install fixed it. Now the HD crypto is initialized ...


1

I don't think there's a way of bypassing GRUB2 (or any other Linux bootloader) via EasyBCD. Most probably EasyBCD is not a universal bootloader and it works by chain loading into GRUB2. Your best bet is to try and make GRUB2 timeout on the Ubuntu entry immediately as Jonyburd's answer is suggesting. I believe you should look into why it failed.


1

You can make a partition bootable with out making an other changes. Also you may try re-installing grub on the hard disk, which should not hurt the partitions either.


1

This kind of functionality is far too advanced for GRUB. GRUB can't even talk over the network except for TFTP. The SSH server that you saw runs under Linux. It is started early during the boot process, after the kernel has booted but before mounting the root filesystem. Linux runs programs from the initramfs (or initrd on older systems) before mounting the ...



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