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32

Here are some suggestions on how to understand the "spirit" of Unix, in addition to the fine recommendations that have been done in the previous posts: "The Unix Programming Environment" by Kernighan and Pike: an old book, but it shows the essence of the Unix environment. It will also help you become an effective shell user. "Unix for the Impatient" is a ...


19

You definitely want to read Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment by Stevens. Don't let the Advanced title scare you away, its very readable.


16

I've always liked this subversion book, which contains a great intro and easy to follow examples. It also has a quickstart guide in the appendix. It's the only documentation I've ever used while I was a subversion user.


16

W. Richard Stevens: Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment


13

The Unix Time-sharing System (10 pages) -- the original UNIX article by UNIX authors Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie, published back in 1974 Design of the Unix operating system -- the classic! Lion's Commentary on UNIX Kernel source code and the corresponding source code itself


11

The Linux Programming Interface by Michael Kerrisk Note that the author is the current maintainer of the Linux man pages. And that it's not out yet so I can't actually say how good it is, but I've read the blog posts about it and it sounds like a good book. (and he is the maintainer of the man pages, and those are mostly well written and he ought to know ...


9

The artist Lisa Haney has provided an explanation on her blog. [Click through because the back cover has more...] Some of the more colourful include: 6 Bash and Perl & Shell 9 The Linux penguin forcing the Windows gorilla to walk the plank 11 Evi Nemeth makes gesture


8

Linux Systems Programming you can refer this also link


7

Books/sites/manuals that I am using frequently: The Linux Kernel: This book is published online as a part of TLDP (The Linux Documentation Project). It is not up-to-date and not an internal manual, but provides useful information and introductory materials about principles and mechanisms of the kernel. Understanding Linux Kernel: IMHO, it is the best book ...


6

O'REILLY Linux Kernel in a Nutshell and O'REILLY Linux Device Drivers


5

Linux Systems Programming or any other book by Robert Love (these are all O'Reilly books): http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596009588


5

Here you can find a database of the best books to learn Linux: http://www.tldp.org/guides.html I'm currently reading Introduction to Linux - A Hands on Guide by Machtelt Garrels And I like it, the way it's written make it easy to understand.


5

Using UNIX by Example, P.C Poole & N. Poole ? http://books.google.co.uk/books?ei=dhs4TZrROcnpgQfq4bTGCA&ct=result&id=LK9QAAAAMAAJ&dq=grep+student+name&q=grades#search_anchor and on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Using-Unix-Example-P-Poole/dp/0201185350


5

I have a general rule of thumb when buying any tech book, avoid the ones that weigh more than a phonebook (remember those? ;)). Avoid any book for dummies, unless you think you are a dummy, avoid any listed as a "Bible". The big fat books are a marketing ploy with tons of white space, large font, and excessive examples. I'm sorry I can't answer your ...


5

cat-v has a Plan 9 doc archive that contains a number of papers, manual pages for various editions and other interesting miscellanea.


5

Introduction to Operating Systems abstractions using Plan9 from Bell Labs might be of your interest.


5

Absolutely. I find it useful for learning key concepts in Unix that may not be that obvious when you're first starting out. shells man pages pipes sed/awk Perl/Python When first starting out with Unix most of these are pretty foreign and a book like this is invaluable. I've had mine since the 2nd edition and it's pretty worn out at this point. The 3rd ...


5

There is "The Design and Implementation of FreeBSD" 2004 Edition: http://smile.amazon.com/Design-Implementation-FreeBSD-Operating-System/dp/0201702452/ 2014 Edition (will be released in September): http://smile.amazon.com/Design-Implementation-FreeBSD-Operating-Edition/dp/0321968972/ The classic 1996 edition is also available for free on the FreeBSD ...


4

IPv6, a cloud looming over the horizon. At the time, IPv6 was a scary beast whose widespread adoption was thought to be in the near future. Now, IPv6 is a scary beast whose widespread adoption is thought to be in the near future. While this may look like a penguin from afar, I believe this is Duke, the mascot of Java. Windows Vista, not part of the scenery ...


4

What about the Ubuntu Manual?


4

There is a page on the Mono site dedicated to books. I hope you will find something useful there.


3

You should opt for LDDv3, as it is one of the fundamental books on the same topic. After you grab this book, go and look for Understanding the Linux Kernel. These two book suffice to fulfill your thirst for kernel (driver) development.


3

Linux Kernel Development by Robert Love covers linux-2.6.34


3

I'd recommend Bruce Molay's "Understanding Unix/Linux Programming" (http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_molay_UNIXProg_1/). I had him as an instructor at Harvard, and he was fantastic.


3

I second the Stevens recommendation. The only real alternative is Advanced UNIX Programming by M.J. Rochkind: http://basepath.com/aup/ ORA's POSIX Programmer's Guide (http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780937175736) may be useful, but I haven't read it myself.


2

Linux Device Drivers is another good resource. It would give you another way to get into the inner workings. From the preface: This is, on the surface, a book about writing device drivers for the Linux system. That is a worthy goal, of course; the flow of new hardware products is not likely to slow down anytime soon, and somebody is going to ...


2

Well, for BSD Unices, there's The Design and Implementation of the 4.4BSD Operating System, parts of which are now apparently available for free at http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en/books/design-44bsd/


2

Official Ubuntu Documentation


2

I'll bite on the first three, front row and center. 1) Web Spider (probably a rogue one that doesn't respect robots.txt, got caught stealing server resources and so has been locked out) 2) Daemon (any background server process) 3) Finger Daemon (an early rudimentary identification server that allowed you to query it to find out about people on the system) ...



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