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32

Here are some suggestions on how to understand the "spirit" of Unix, in addition to the fine recommendations that have been done in the previous posts: "The Unix Programming Environment" by Kernighan and Pike: an old book, but it shows the essence of the Unix environment. It will also help you become an effective shell user. "Unix for the Impatient" is a ...


12

The Unix Time-sharing System (10 pages) -- the original UNIX article by UNIX authors Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie, published back in 1974 Design of the Unix operating system -- the classic! Lion's Commentary on UNIX Kernel source code and the corresponding source code itself


9

The Linux Programming Interface by Michael Kerrisk Note that the author is the current maintainer of the Linux man pages. And that it's not out yet so I can't actually say how good it is, but I've read the blog posts about it and it sounds like a good book. (and he is the maintainer of the man pages, and those are mostly well written and he ought to know ...


8

The artist Lisa Haney has provided an explanation on her blog. [Click through because the back cover has more...] Some of the more colourful include: 6 Bash and Perl & Shell 9 The Linux penguin forcing the Windows gorilla to walk the plank 11 Evi Nemeth makes gesture


7

Books/sites/manuals that I am using frequently: The Linux Kernel: This book is published online as a part of TLDP (The Linux Documentation Project). It is not up-to-date and not an internal manual, but provides useful information and introductory materials about principles and mechanisms of the kernel. Understanding Linux Kernel: IMHO, it is the best book ...


6

You can read some of the various online linux-for-newbies resources, and they might be some help. Going through the documentation for your distribution is worthwhile — both Ubuntu and Fedora have teams producing professional-quality documentation, at https://help.ubuntu.com/ and http://docs.fedoraproject.org/ respectively. If you're a book learner, there's ...


5

Using UNIX by Example, P.C Poole & N. Poole ? http://books.google.co.uk/books?ei=dhs4TZrROcnpgQfq4bTGCA&ct=result&id=LK9QAAAAMAAJ&dq=grep+student+name&q=grades#search_anchor and on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Using-Unix-Example-P-Poole/dp/0201185350


5

Specific things you might want to look into is: Shell scripting Being able to use bash is a must for anyone thats going to get intimate on the command line Services You will have to understand the services your webserver will be running. If your running PHP and MYSQL. You'll want to read about LAMP. As Falmarri says, solving individual problems when ...


4

Here you can find a database of the best books to learn Linux: http://www.tldp.org/guides.html I'm currently reading Introduction to Linux - A Hands on Guide by Machtelt Garrels And I like it, the way it's written make it easy to understand.


4

I have a general rule of thumb when buying any tech book, avoid the ones that weigh more than a phonebook (remember those? ;)). Avoid any book for dummies, unless you think you are a dummy, avoid any listed as a "Bible". The big fat books are a marketing ploy with tons of white space, large font, and excessive examples. I'm sorry I can't answer your ...


3

Absolutely. I find it useful for learning key concepts in Unix that may not be that obvious when you're first starting out. shells man pages pipes sed/awk Perl/Python When first starting out with Unix most of these are pretty foreign and a book like this is invaluable. I've had mine since the 2nd edition and it's pretty worn out at this point. The 3rd ...


3

A good general starting point for Linux administration is this book: Linux Administration Handbook (2nd Edition) It is about a lot of the basics and also has a chapter about web. Besides the points already mentioned, this things might come handy: perl/python or another scripting language for automating tasks sed and awk are always useful (IBM has some ...


3

The Art of Unix Programming - Eric S. Raymond For me this book is the secret "Highway Code to Using Linux". It's potentially the perfect answer. The book's title might cause a newby Linux user to disregard it (especially if they are not interested in programming 'it', per se). But, it has been an amazing read that reveals many things that other books, ...


3

I second the Stevens recommendation. The only real alternative is Advanced UNIX Programming by M.J. Rochkind: http://basepath.com/aup/ ORA's POSIX Programmer's Guide (http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780937175736) may be useful, but I haven't read it myself.


2

Linux Device Drivers is another good resource. It would give you another way to get into the inner workings. From the preface: This is, on the surface, a book about writing device drivers for the Linux system. That is a worthy goal, of course; the flow of new hardware products is not likely to slow down anytime soon, and somebody is going to ...


2

Perhaps Running Linux would be a good book for you to begin with before you read your system administration book. I think it covers a little bit of everything. Admittedly I have not read it. Also the chapter on Gnome and KDE is certainly out of date. Though anything that a webdeveloper should need won't really be. FYI, I have never read this book, I was an ...


2

I'll bite on the first three, front row and center. 1) Web Spider (probably a rogue one that doesn't respect robots.txt, got caught stealing server resources and so has been locked out) 2) Daemon (any background server process) 3) Finger Daemon (an early rudimentary identification server that allowed you to query it to find out about people on the system) ...


2

Without delving into details of applications running on the system which is where normally performance tuning would start you can start looking at system performance through: https://access.redhat.com/knowledge/docs/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Performance_Tuning_Guide/index.html http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/REDP4285.html ...


1

If you're happy working through online tutorials I would reccomend looking at the Linode documentation library. You don't need to have a Linode server to make use of their articles and they cover a wide range of subjects. http://library.linode.com/ If you're craving some structure to your learning process then I suggest you use the RHCSA exam objectives to ...


1

I would suggest combination of Unix Power Tools and Learning the bash Shell First book will teach you how to work efficiently, elegantly, and creatively with the Unix tool suite and second book will teach you shell scripting in bash which is the most common shell used by Linux distributions.


1

Unless you are particularly interested in *nix kernel implementations of the TCP/IP stack I would recomend that you take a look at lwIP implementation. The implementation is small enough to grasp without that much problem, and it pretty well documented. Take a look at the Rx flowchart and the wikia web site.


1

There's a significant difference between TCP/IP, the protocol specification and various implementations. If you want the authoritative source, there's nothing better than the RFC. If you want details about Linux's TCP/IP implementation try TCP/IP & Linux Protocol Implementation, or read the source code. If you want general information about the TCP/IP ...


1

For shell I strongly recommend Portable Shell Programming and Portable Shell Scripting. The first gets you started quickly; it's concise with excellent examples. The second delves much more deeply into the intricacies of the shell; why things work the way they do. Although both are focused on POSIX shell they'll give you a solid grounding for any shell ...


1

Novell (aka SuSE) Linux: NCLA (Linux Administrator) - based on LPIC 1 NCLP (Linux Professional) - based on SLES11 NCLE (Linux Engineer) - based on OpenEnterprise Server RedHat Linux: RHCSA RHCE more... The question is - what do you want to achieve? I would rather employ someone with some LPIC3-exams than someone boasting about NCLA or RHCSA. IMHO ...


1

There's no book on this subject that I know of, you get experience troubleshooting by doing it. You become better at troubleshooting as you understand how all the different components of a system work together. In the example you gave of a website not loading, I've seen the following following cause that to happen (list is not exclusive): DNS not ...


1

For an excellent introduction to, and explanation of, the foundations of Unix (and therefore Linux) read The Unix Programming Environment. Written in 1984 by Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike, it covers the basic philosophy of Unix and introduces many of the small, "one thing well"–type programmes that are still present (and invaluable) in contemporary ...


1

Running Linux Should be a good book for novices. I think it covers a little bit of everything. The chapter on Gnome and KDE is certainly out of date. But still, this book should be a good general guide to Linux. FYI, I have never read this book, I was an advanced user before I found this book. I learned by DIY.


1

The Linux Documentation Project (TLDP) is a useful resource; some of the information is old, but lots of it is still very applicable. Especially useful is the Introduction to Linux - A Hands on Guide from the TLDP guides.


1

The svn book (as others have mentioned) is probably the most comprehensive text. If you want a quick introduction to the concepts then the second chapter of the TortoiseSVN documentation "Basic Version-Control Concepts" is quite good.


1

I agree with all the others and I have to say that Stevens' APUE (I have the second edition) is a classic. I would also like to add that Eric Raymond's The Art of UNIX Programming ranks right up there with Stevens on my list.



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