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32

I would assume most distros accept individual private donations (they may also accept free hosting). However, that is probably not the bulk of their financing in most cases. Note that some of the major distros may have some paid staff, and possibly also office space, the cost of which likely exceeds that of hosting the repos1. This should not be taken to ...


24

Usually each Linux distro has a few central servers were they put directly all the packages. But there exists mirrors arround the world that have copies of these packages. These mirrors comunicate directly with the central servers looking for updates periodically. Normally there is a delay in the release of an update between this central servers and the ...


15

You can throttle the network bandwidth on the interface using the command called tc Man page available at http://linux.die.net/man/8/tc A useful script is found at http://atmail.com/kb/2009/throttling-bandwidth/ Or for more simple, use wondershaper: http://jwalanta.blogspot.com/2009/04/easy-bandwidth-shaping-in-linux.html


15

Have a look at trickle a userspace bandwidth shaper. Just start your shell with trickle and specify the speed, e.g.: trickle -d 100 zsh which tries to limit the download speed to 100KB/s for all programs launched inside this shell. As trickle uses LD_PRELOAD this won't work with static linked programs but this isn't a problem for most programs.


14

One option that I just discovered is to use trickle. trickle is a portable lightweight userspace bandwidth shaper. It can run in collaborative mode (together with trickled) or in stand alone mode. trickle works by taking advantage of the unix loader preloading. Essentially it provides, to the application, a new version of the functionality ...


11

You can use iptables to mark a packet (--pid-owner ...), then use tc to shape the traffic. Also "--sid-owner" can be used to include threads and children of that process. http://www.frozentux.net/iptables-tutorial/iptables-tutorial.html#OWNERMATCH Match --pid-owner Kernel 2.3, 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 Example iptables -A OUTPUT -m owner --pid-owner 78 ...


8

tc (traffic control), from the iproute2 suite. See the Linux Advanced Routing & Traffic Control HOWTO – notably, the queuing section – and netem for help.


8

If you can write to a pipe (or stdout), you can install the pv (pipe viewer) command. It was originally written to display the progress of data transferred through a pipe. tar cvf - /files/to/backup | pv -L 512k > /your/file/on/sshfs -L RATE, --rate-limit RATE Limit the transfer to a maximum of RATE bytes per second. A suffix ...


8

There are several tools that can do this. Bmon One that should be in most repositories for various distros is bmon.      It can be run in a condensed view too.             If you're looking for something else I'd suggest taking a look at this Linuxaria article titled: Monitor ...


7

Have a look at ntop.org.


7

I'm going to have to be cheap and copy my answer from this question. ntop is probably the best solution for doing this. It is designed to run long term and capture exactly what youre looking for. It can show you which clients are receiving/sending the most traffic, where theyre recieving/sending to, what protocols and ports are being used etc. It then uses ...


7

I'd double check this but this article lists this as one of drawbacks to using Trickle. The lack of the feature to dynamically change the limits. excerpt from article - Control your bandwidth with Trickle My biggest concern with Trickle is that it can't dynamically adjust set speeds. So, if you set the upload rates at 20kbps for Firefox, but later ...


6

If you already have an Apache setup somewhere, you can use mod_bw, which also works on proxied connections (i.e. Apache just forwards everything to the proper server, but slows the responses down.)


6

First, the easy way: rsync has a --bwlimit parameter. That's a constant rate, but you can use that to easily throttle it down. Now, if you want the adaptive rate, there is the linux traffic control framework, which is actually fairly complicated. There are several references I'm aware of: Linux Advanced Routing & Traffic Control Traffic Control HOWTO ...


6

You know you already have that with ifconfig right? Ifconfig keeps counters about your incomming and outgoing bandwidth on each interface by default. Usually you can't reset counters except rebooting (with a few exceptions) From console you can easily leave a cron running each three days and saving results to a file for later check. Something like this: ...


5

NetHogs is the best tool I have found so far that fulfills my need, but sadly needs to be run as root. (via)


5

Limiting network resources based on some criterias is the subject of QoS. There are several different ways to control user traffic on Linux systems. There is a good How-to about advanced routing techniques and traffic control on Linux by Bert Hubert.


5

ntop can give you exactly what you're asking for. It collects data about all the traffic flowing through your network (and can collect data from other networks if they have a device configured to send netfow data to your system). It will show you every host on the network, with how much bandwidth they've used. It will let you drill down into each host and ...


5

I believe it depends on how fast you ping the server: If it's one ping per second (or even slightly faster), they will most likely not care. If it's much faster, they may consider it a DDOS attack by ping flood. It's especially the case if you don't wait for the previous answer before sending the next ping. It reminds me of the kids who brought Yahoo!, ...


5

pv, which is available as a NetBSD package, lets you limit the rate of a pipe. <large_file pv -L 1k | netcat …


5

I believe what you're trying to accomplish is probably best (and AFAIK only) possible combining multiple commands as you're currently doing. With some clever shell scripting and piped data, you could get the output you're looking for. You seem to be up against some tenants of 'The UNIX Philosophy:' Make each program do one thing well. To do a new ...


5

NFS is a file system, as per its name. User processes that open/read/seek/write/close files on an NFS-mounted directory don't know that it's an NFS file system because the kernel makes NFS look like any other file system. So, a user process that reads an NFS-mounted file will generate a read(2) system call that ends up causing some kernel code to run. All ...


4

Dummynet does what you want and more, you can even control the latency, random packet loss and lots more.


4

http://lartc.org/wondershaper/ It is in Ubuntu / Debian repositories, probably others too. It limits not just a single shell, but the whole machine. Never tried it myself though


4

instead of writing it all new, you could use tools like cacti. With it you can analyze your network.


4

Most of the time big company like Intel IBM AMD ... If you look at Ubuntu that's the canonical company that handle the bandwidth. For source forge lots of universities offers bandwidth and once again big company like phone operators (free in France for example). Centos gives a list of bandwidth sponsor on this page http://www.centos.org/download/mirrors/ ...


4

With regard to Debian, companies using Debian donate servers and bandwidth. I think the Project also uses monetary donations to purchase hardware, particularly specialist hardware. You can find discussions of this on the Debian mailing lists. However, I've never heard of Debian paying for bandwidth. Presumably they can find enough ISPs to let them use ...


3

ttcp is a simple, possibly too simple, speed test utility. pchar is another one people cite a lot, I've had bad luck with it, personally. Here's how I'd use ttcp. You need two machines, each with ttcp (http://playground.sun.com/pub/tcp-impl/ttcp/ttcp.c) compiled on them. HostA % ./ttcp -r -s -p 9401 ... HostB % ./ttcp -s -p 9401 < /boot/vmlinuz ...


3

You might be interested in TeSpeed. It is described as: If you are looking for tool that is able to test internet connection speed fron Linux terminal, you have found it! :) TeSpeed uses speedtest.net servers to check upload and download rate and it puts that information on charts. http://tespeed.sourceforge.net/


3

I'm just repeating the answers listed on this (deleted?) stackoverflow question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/426272/how-to-test-internet-connection-speed-from-command-line k2z: wget --output-document=/dev/null http://speedtest.wdc01.softlayer.com/downloads/test500.zip or git clone https://github.com/sivel/speedtest-cli cd speedtest-cli ...



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